TCT or diamond core drill?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Fred, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. Fred

    Fred Guest

    Hello again,

    I would like to add a fan to the downstairs cloakroom. I need to drill
    a hole in the wall. Is it easier to cut an oblong out and use
    rectangular ducting or should I use a core drill and take a 110cm
    circle for round ducting?

    I see that the catalogues list TCT core drills and diamond core
    drills. Is one better than the other? Do I need a special drill to
    spin them?

    Do you think that 10cm fans are any good? Should I upgrade to 15cm?

    Thanks.
    Fred, Mar 25, 2008
    #1
  2. Fred

    Ed Sirett Guest

    On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 18:17:49 +0000, Fred wrote:

    > Hello again,
    >
    > I would like to add a fan to the downstairs cloakroom. I need to drill a
    > hole in the wall. Is it easier to cut an oblong out and use rectangular
    > ducting or should I use a core drill and take a 110cm circle for round
    > ducting?
    >
    > I see that the catalogues list TCT core drills and diamond core drills.
    > Is one better than the other? Do I need a special drill to spin them?
    >
    > Do you think that 10cm fans are any good? Should I upgrade to 15cm?
    >
    > Thanks.


    Try googling the archives. We had this thread a few weeks ago.

    Diamond much better than TCT, both need drill with safety clutch, both
    much more expensive than by hand.

    10cm is good for a bathroom certainly for a small cloakroom. Possibly not
    good enough for a kitchen.


    --
    Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
    The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
    Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
    Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html
    Choosing a Boiler FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/BoilerChoice.html
    Ed Sirett, Mar 25, 2008
    #2
  3. Fred

    John Rumm Guest

    Fred wrote:

    > I would like to add a fan to the downstairs cloakroom. I need to drill
    > a hole in the wall. Is it easier to cut an oblong out and use
    > rectangular ducting or should I use a core drill and take a 110cm
    > circle for round ducting?


    The mount on the wall extractors usually expect to be sited directly
    over a round hole. If you are ducting then you have more options.

    > I see that the catalogues list TCT core drills and diamond core
    > drills. Is one better than the other? Do I need a special drill to
    > spin them?


    Diamond is better, but as a one off, TCT will probably cope unless you
    have very hard bricks etc.

    You need a powerful drill to spin them. I have managed to drill a 107mm
    core with my 780W SDS on a number of occasions, but you have to take it
    nice and gently and try to keep dead straight to avoid snagging the bit.
    Usually the clutch on a SDS is set to let go a little too soon for cores
    above 70mm or so. Dedicated core drills usually have a bit more power,
    and a more aggressive setting on the clutch. (powerful drills without a
    clutch are a recipe for various injuries when the core snags)

    > Do you think that 10cm fans are any good? Should I upgrade to 15cm?


    They can be quite effective in the smaller rooms.

    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Mar 26, 2008
    #3
  4. Fred

    Fred Guest

    On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 02:06:12 +0000, John Rumm
    <> wrote:

    >Diamond is better, but as a one off, TCT will probably cope unless you
    >have very hard bricks etc.
    >
    >You need a powerful drill to spin them. I have managed to drill a 107mm
    >core with my 780W SDS on a number of occasions, but you have to take it
    >nice and gently and try to keep dead straight to avoid snagging the bit.
    >Usually the clutch on a SDS is set to let go a little too soon for cores
    >above 70mm or so. Dedicated core drills usually have a bit more power,
    >and a more aggressive setting on the clutch. (powerful drills without a
    >clutch are a recipe for various injuries when the core snags)


    Sorry if this is a daft question: how do I know if my drill has a
    clutch? Does the fact that I don't know mean that it doesn't? Do all
    sds drills have clutches? What about "traditional" drills?
    Fred, Mar 30, 2008
    #4
  5. Fred

    Fred Guest

    On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 19:29:55 +0000 (UTC), Ed Sirett
    <> wrote:

    >Try googling the archives. We had this thread a few weeks ago.


    Thanks. I found the recent TCT core thread and have read that. I think
    it was the TCT set being discussed that I had seen and thought about
    using.

    How do I search the archives? I didn't even know there were any.
    Fred, Mar 30, 2008
    #5
  6. Fred

    John Rumm Guest

    Fred wrote:
    > On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 19:29:55 +0000 (UTC), Ed Sirett
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Try googling the archives. We had this thread a few weeks ago.

    >
    > Thanks. I found the recent TCT core thread and have read that. I think
    > it was the TCT set being discussed that I had seen and thought about
    > using.
    >
    > How do I search the archives? I didn't even know there were any.


    groups.google.com archives pretty much all the text based usenet feeds.
    You can either use the advanced search facility to search a particular
    group, or include "group:uk.d-i-y" in your search string.

    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Mar 31, 2008
    #6
  7. Fred

    John Rumm Guest

    Fred wrote:

    >> You need a powerful drill to spin them. I have managed to drill a 107mm
    >> core with my 780W SDS on a number of occasions, but you have to take it
    >> nice and gently and try to keep dead straight to avoid snagging the bit.
    >> Usually the clutch on a SDS is set to let go a little too soon for cores
    >> above 70mm or so. Dedicated core drills usually have a bit more power,
    >> and a more aggressive setting on the clutch. (powerful drills without a
    >> clutch are a recipe for various injuries when the core snags)

    >
    > Sorry if this is a daft question: how do I know if my drill has a
    > clutch? Does the fact that I don't know mean that it doesn't? Do all
    > sds drills have clutches? What about "traditional" drills?


    Actually a good question - and there is no simple answer to it.

    The "quality" SDS machines will have a clutch, as will anything that
    mentions in its advertising blurb that it has one. However don't assume
    all SDS machines do. Some of the budget ones are renowned for not having
    one (google back a few years for accidents with NuTool ones that had a
    habit of slipping out of chisel only mode into chisel + rotation mode!).

    Anything advertised as a "core drill" will also certainly have one.

    Most traditional drills and hammer drills won't have one.



    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Mar 31, 2008
    #7
  8. Fred

    Fred Guest

    On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 04:21:34 +0100, John Rumm
    <> wrote:

    >groups.google.com archives pretty much all the text based usenet feeds.


    I was always taught that google was not the way to read news ;)

    Does it obey X-no-archive headers? If so, it may miss a lot of the
    posts but if it ignores it, that's naughty!
    Fred, Mar 31, 2008
    #8
  9. Fred

    Fred Guest

    On Tue, 01 Apr 2008 03:04:04 +0100, John Rumm
    <> wrote:

    >It does respect the no archive header - so indeed there are gaps
    >(although it keeps them for a few days). Often enough of the non
    >archived posts are quoted in other replies to let you figure out the
    >gist of it.


    Thanks. That's useful to know. It must cost Google in terms of
    storage. What's in it for them? Do they carry advertisements?
    Fred, Apr 2, 2008
    #9
  10. Fred

    Fred Guest

    On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 04:26:23 +0100, John Rumm
    <> wrote:

    >The "quality" SDS machines will have a clutch, as will anything that
    >mentions in its advertising blurb that it has one. However don't assume
    >all SDS machines do. Some of the budget ones are renowned for not having
    >one (google back a few years for accidents with NuTool ones that had a
    >habit of slipping out of chisel only mode into chisel + rotation mode!).


    I notice that the Screwfix catalogue has a mixture of 2kg SDS drills
    some with clutches and some without; the same is true of the 6kg
    drills. I will have to double check whether mine has a clutch or not.

    Thanks again.
    Fred, Apr 9, 2008
    #10

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