Swimming Pool Fiberglass Coating?

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by Stuart Benoff, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. I have a 25 year old 33,000 gallon inground pool that is in need of
    painting, needs some tiles replaced and has some cracks between the
    coping and the tiles. Most companies want to acid wash, paint and
    replace the tile and coping but one company wants to remove the tiles
    and place a 1/8 inch fiberglass coating over the gunite, old tile line
    and the coping.

    Has anyone heard of this process and have any experiences (good or bad)
    with it?
     
    Stuart Benoff, Aug 2, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Stuart Benoff

    SQLit Guest

    "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message
    news:dco508$30dd$...
    > I have a 25 year old 33,000 gallon inground pool that is in need of
    > painting, needs some tiles replaced and has some cracks between the
    > coping and the tiles. Most companies want to acid wash, paint and
    > replace the tile and coping but one company wants to remove the tiles
    > and place a 1/8 inch fiberglass coating over the gunite, old tile line
    > and the coping.
    >
    > Has anyone heard of this process and have any experiences (good or bad)
    > with it?


    25 year old pool, time to remove and replaster/tile. Painting will not last

    No clue on how the fiberglass will hold up.
     
    SQLit, Aug 2, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Stuart Benoff

    SteveB Guest

    > Stuart Benoff writes:
    >
    >> Has anyone heard of this process and have any experiences (good or bad)
    >> with it?

    >



    For the seller, it is an excellent way to make money. For the buyer, it
    don't work.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Aug 2, 2005
    #3
  4. >
    >
    >You mean fiberglass embedded in epoxy. Lasts about seven years in
    >immersion before it gets ugly and/or delaminates. (Remember
    >chattahoochee?)
    >


    Exactly. They use a fiberglass material and attach it to the existing
    plaster (after roughing it up) using an epoxy. Then apply several coats
    of a fiberglass resin, sand it smooth and apply a final clear/gloss
    coat. They recommend removing the tiles and putting the fiberglass
    right over the coping. This way, there are no gaps to crack or for water
    to get in to. It also has a lifetime warranty against cracks and
    leaks. Don't get me wrong - I'm not for it - just exploring the
    options before diving in (pardon the pun). It's a pretty expensive
    process but I'm just starting to get prices for plastering, tiling and
    coping so I'm not sure how to compare it yet.

    Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.
     
    Stuart Benoff, Aug 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Stuart Benoff

    SteveB Guest

    "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote
    It's a pretty expensive
    > process but I'm just starting to get prices for plastering, tiling and
    > coping so I'm not sure how to compare it yet.
    >
    > Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.


    I got my 33,000 gallon in ground pool replastered two years ago. It was
    $3,000. They came one morning at 7 AM. There was a crew of about 15 guys.
    They chipped the old plaster out with air chisels, hauled it off, and were
    gone by noon. The next day, they came at 7 AM again, and started shooting.
    They left by noon, and left two guys to finish. We started adding water at
    3 PM.

    The pool was empty for less than 48 hours. It looks beautiful still.

    The best $3,000 I ever spent.

    Don't dick around with experimental things. Have it done the old fashioned
    way by a reputable pool replasterer. You will notice the difference seven
    years down the road when the fiberglass starts to deteriorate from the sun.

    And then you will have to pay more to have someone come in and wreck it out
    and do it right.

    Do it once. Do it right.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Aug 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Steve,

    At this point I'd be very happy with paying $3K although you're not including new tile and coping but I agree with doing it right the first time.&nbsp;&nbsp; How long do you expect your new plaster to last?

    Stu

    SteveB wrote:

    "Stuart Benoff" &lt;&gt; wrote It's a pretty expensive



    process but I'm just starting to get prices for plastering, tiling and coping so I'm not sure how to compare it yet. Thank you all for sharing your thoughts.



    I got my 33,000 gallon in ground pool replastered two years ago. It was $3,000. They came one morning at 7 AM. There was a crew of about 15 guys. They chipped the old plaster out with air chisels, hauled it off, and were gone by noon. The next day, they came at 7 AM again, and started shooting. They left by noon, and left two guys to finish. We started adding water at 3 PM. The pool was empty for less than 48 hours. It looks beautiful still. The best $3,000 I ever spent. Don't dick around with experimental things. Have it done the old fashioned way by a reputable pool replasterer. You will notice the difference seven years down the road when the fiberglass starts to deteriorate from the sun. And then you will have to pay more to have someone come in and wreck it out and do it right. Do it once. Do it right. Steve
     
    Stuart Benoff, Aug 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Stuart Benoff

    SteveB Guest

    "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message
    news:dcqr1r$3gno$...
    > Steve,
    >
    > At this point I'd be very happy with paying $3K although you're not
    > including new tile and coping but I agree with doing it right the first
    > time. How long do you expect your new plaster to last?
    >
    > Stu
    >


    We had a company that has been in business for 30 years do it. He said it
    lasts about twenty years depending on the way you keep up with the chemicals
    in the pool, algae control, etc.

    The pool was originally built in '85, so that job lasted 18 years. I think
    they use a little better "stuff" now, and with the petroleum product
    additives, it lasts longer than whatever they had available 25 years ago.

    As with anything, check out the companies, and get competitive bids. We had
    one guy over that has been in business for a long time. He had a very bad
    reputation, but there is so much business out there that he still does a lot
    of business. I was just lucky to have a friend who does service work for
    the local hotels who put us on to this guy. One guy even put his price on
    the back of a business card that had the phone number on the front changed
    with a pen.

    Yer spending a lot of money, and you want it to last. Do the footwork, and
    you won't be sorry.

    BTW, now is the time to have all the tile and coping work done. Maybe even
    cool decking. I got a killer deal on the pool deck. Again, a referral from
    a friend. After two years, we called the guy the other day because we had
    some spots coming off. He came and fixed it THE SAME DAY and didn't want
    any money. I gave him $50 anyway.

    Good luck. In a short time, it's like you have a new pool.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Aug 3, 2005
    #7
  8. I'm starting to get prices for this work and now I really wish I could get the price you mention.&nbsp; A rep from Anthony came out last week and they want $20,000 to re-plaster, re-tile and put in new coping.&nbsp;&nbsp; Of course, if I agree to do it this fall it's only 18K.&nbsp;&nbsp; My pool is 880 square feet - so it's on the larger side for backyard pools.

    I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty the pool.&nbsp;&nbsp; I'm thinking of renting a pump and doing that myself.&nbsp; Does anyone know if there is anything to watch out for when emptying a pool?

    Thanks!


    Pagan wrote:

    "Stuart Benoff" &lt;&gt; wrote in message news:dcqr1r$3gno$...



    Steve, At this point I'd be very happy with paying $3K although you're not



    including new tile and coping but I agree with doing it right the first time. How long do you expect your new plaster to last?



    I have a pool slightly smaller than SteveB, 40 years old, and it cost something less than $3,000 for plaster, roughly $1,000 for tiles, and $1,2000 for coping. I don't remember, exactly, because I also had the whole pool replumbed, with new skimmer and all new equipment. Anyway, my neighbor had the fiberglass thing done years ago, and just a few months later they had it replastered. The fiberglass coating over plaster/concrete thing is nothing new, and it's as big a rip-off now as it's always been. Avoid it at all costs. Painting isn't much better, in most cases. Although some folks have painted their pools and had good results, most end up having to either remove the paint, or the plaster, within a few months to a few years, as this stuff isn't designed to last more than 7 years or so. New plaster is your best bet, along with some new tile if you can. The coping can probably be repaired if it's not too bad off. You might want to take a close look at your plumbing. If it's copper, or it needs repair which requires cutting up the pool, now is the time to do it. Pagan
     
    Stuart Benoff, Aug 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Stuart Benoff

    SQLit Guest

    "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message news:ddq6h7$jvc$...
    I'm starting to get prices for this work and now I really wish I could get the price you mention. A rep from Anthony came out last week and they want $20,000 to re-plaster, re-tile and put in new coping. Of course, if I agree to do it this fall it's only 18K. My pool is 880 square feet - so it's on the larger side for backyard pools.

    I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty the pool. I'm thinking of renting a pump and doing that myself. Does anyone know if there is anything to watch out for when emptying a pool?


    $1100 to empty the pool, if your local (PHX) I will do it for $900.00.

    I drained my pool into the lawn. Got some extra backwash hose and started from the far end of my 1/2 acre lot. My valving allowed for a back wash (sort of) with out going through the filter.
    This lowered the level to just below the skimmer. Then I put some cleaner hose on the skimmer and lowered it with the pool pump to about 3 feet from the top. I bought a submersible 120v pump and left that run over night. Next day there was very little water left. My pool was only 25k gallons. Took best part of 2 1/2 days to empty the pool. I removed the drain cover when the water was shallow enough and put the pump in there.

    With the volume of water you have you better check with the authorities before you consider the street. If your not on a septic system you can use the clean out for the sewer. It will go a bit slower the sewer even though it is 4 inch will reach a saturation point and then slow down a bit.
     
    SQLit, Aug 15, 2005
    #9
  10. Stuart Benoff

    SteveB Guest

    I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty the
    pool.

    If your pool has a backwash device, you just flip the handle, and all the
    water goes down the sewer as fast as the pump will pump it. If you need to
    pump it out, you can rent a pump for about $100 a day.

    $1100 to empty a pool is an insult to human intelligence.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Aug 15, 2005
    #10
  11. Sorry ... I got this wrong. They want $1100 to refill the pool with
    water after the new plaster is applied. I guess they're going to truck
    it in somehow. I'm going to follow up with them about how long the new
    plaster can go without water to see if this is really necessary.

    Stu

    SteveB wrote:

    > I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty the
    >pool.
    >
    >If your pool has a backwash device, you just flip the handle, and all the
    >water goes down the sewer as fast as the pump will pump it. If you need to
    >pump it out, you can rent a pump for about $100 a day.
    >
    >$1100 to empty a pool is an insult to human intelligence.
    >
    >Steve
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Stuart Benoff, Aug 16, 2005
    #11
  12. Stuart Benoff

    SteveB Guest

    "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message
    news:ddt02l$fq6s$...
    > Sorry ... I got this wrong. They want $1100 to refill the pool with
    > water after the new plaster is applied. I guess they're going to truck it
    > in somehow. I'm going to follow up with them about how long the new
    > plaster can go without water to see if this is really necessary.
    >
    > Stu


    We started filling mine at three in the afternoon after it had been
    plastered only six hours earlier. They were still working around the pool
    and edges as the water was rising. I was concerned because the plaster was
    still soft.

    It can't go any time without water, or it will crack. There is a process
    the cement goes through. I noticed that there looked like hundreds, nay,
    thousands of blisters on the bottom of the pool as it was filling. I called
    the guy, and he said it was normal, that the concrete was hardening and
    squeezing out some of the components.

    Do whatever your installer says to do. They know what they are doing, and
    if they are a contractor, and they blow it, they have to make it right.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Aug 16, 2005
    #12
  13. Stuart Benoff

    Guest

    Stuart Benoff wrote:
    > I have a 25 year old 33,000 gallon inground pool that is in need of
    > painting, needs some tiles replaced and has some cracks between the
    > coping and the tiles. Most companies want to acid wash, paint and
    > replace the tile and coping but one company wants to remove the tiles
    > and place a 1/8 inch fiberglass coating over the gunite, old tile line
    > and the coping.
    >
    > Has anyone heard of this process and have any experiences (good or bad)
    > with it?


    Yes, I have the fiberglass coating on my pool that was applied to the
    old plaster finish. The pool is in Arizona and both my neighbor and I
    had the pools resurfaced with fiberglass in 1989 (shasta pools did the
    fiberglass). My pool is now ready to be resurfaced again, and his is
    holding up better, so the fiberglass held out for ~15 years, roughly
    the same duration of plaster in the same era her in hardwater
    Arizona... The fiberglass is a very maintenance free surface, far
    superior to plaster in my opinion, because algae doesn't seem to be
    able to attach to it. It is very easy to clean, I treat it just like a
    giant bathtub when service draining and cleaning... It cost rought
    ~3000 to resurface a 15K gallon pool in fiberglass back in 1989...
     
    , Aug 17, 2005
    #13
  14. Stuart Benoff

    glassguy Guest

    Stuart Benoff wrote:
    > I'm starting to get prices for this work and now I really wish I could get the price you mention. A rep from Anthony came out last week and they want $20,000 to re-plaster, re-tile and put in new coping. Of course, if I agree to do it this fall it's only 18K. My pool is 880 square feet - so it's on the larger side for backyard pools.
    >
    > I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty the pool. I'm thinking of renting a pump and doing that myself. Does anyone know if there is anything to watch out for when emptying a pool?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >
    > Pagan wrote:
    > "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message
    > news:dcqr1r$3gno$...
    >
    >
    > Steve,
    >
    > At this point I'd be very happy with paying $3K although you're not
    >
    >
    > including new tile and coping but I agree with doing it right the first
    > time. How long do you expect your new plaster to last?
    >
    >
    >
    > I have a pool slightly smaller than SteveB, 40 years old, and it cost
    > something less than $3,000 for plaster, roughly $1,000 for tiles, and
    > $1,2000 for coping. I don't remember, exactly, because I also had the whole
    > pool replumbed, with new skimmer and all new equipment. Anyway, my neighbor
    > had the fiberglass thing done years ago, and just a few months later they
    > had it replastered. The fiberglass coating over plaster/concrete thing is
    > nothing new, and it's as big a rip-off now as it's always been. Avoid it at
    > all costs.
    >
    > Painting isn't much better, in most cases. Although some folks have painted
    > their pools and had good results, most end up having to either remove the
    > paint, or the plaster, within a few months to a few years, as this stuff
    > isn't designed to last more than 7 years or so.
    >
    > New plaster is your best bet, along with some new tile if you can. The
    > coping can probably be repaired if it's not too bad off.
    >
    > You might want to take a close look at your plumbing. If it's copper, or it
    > needs repair which requires cutting up the pool, now is the time to do it.
    >
    > Pagan


    Regarding the choice of a fiberglass coating and "it's as big a rip-off
    now as it's always been", is a statement I must take issue with.
    Fiberglass resurfacing, done properly with the proper resins and
    gelcoat will last up to 25 years, although it may need some cosmetic
    help after 15 or so years.

    There is no plaster, used for resurfacing, that will last even 10
    years. That's why the guarantee for replastering is never greater than
    4 years, and is usually 2 years, or even less. Plaster is a great
    solution for new pools because it will last a long time, but putting
    plaster on an old pool is an entirely different story. That's why the
    replaster guarantee is so short.

    I take issue with the statement that "as this stuff (paint)isn't
    designed to last more than 7 years or so." No POOL paint is designed or
    expected to last "7 years or so". Two or three years is the maximum,
    then it goes downhill rapidly. Unless, of course, you refer to lead
    based paint which could last 7 years, but that's no longer available in
    this country.

    Finally, I take issue with "The coping can probably be repaired if it's
    not too bad off." Coping cannot be repaired in any way, shape, or form;
    it can only be replaced.

    My response is based on 14 years of executive management in swimming
    pool restoration.
     
    glassguy, Aug 24, 2005
    #14
  15. Stuart Benoff

    glassguy Guest

    Beware of any fiberglass company that agrees to cover concrete coping
    with fiberglass. It indicates they don't know what they're doing, or
    they don't plan on being in business for long.

    Coping stones move, allowing water to seep-in between the fiberglass
    and the concrete coping. This, in turn, allows water to get between the
    fiberglass and the wall of the pool. Thus, delamination begins.

    This is a major cause of the horror stories about pool resurfacing with
    fiberglass.
     
    glassguy, Aug 24, 2005
    #15
  16. Stuart Benoff

    glassguy Guest

    Pagan wrote:
    > "glassguy" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Stuart Benoff wrote:
    > > > I'm starting to get prices for this work and now I really wish I could

    > get the price you mention. A rep from Anthony came out last week and they
    > want $20,000 to re-plaster, re-tile and put in new coping. Of course, if I
    > agree to do it this fall it's only 18K. My pool is 880 square feet - so
    > it's on the larger side for backyard pools.
    > > >
    > > > I got a second price around $14,000 and this includes $1,100 to empty

    > the pool. I'm thinking of renting a pump and doing that myself. Does
    > anyone know if there is anything to watch out for when emptying a pool?
    > > >
    > > > Thanks!
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Pagan wrote:
    > > > "Stuart Benoff" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:dcqr1r$3gno$...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Steve,
    > > >
    > > > At this point I'd be very happy with paying $3K although you're not
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > including new tile and coping but I agree with doing it right the first
    > > > time. How long do you expect your new plaster to last?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I have a pool slightly smaller than SteveB, 40 years old, and it cost
    > > > something less than $3,000 for plaster, roughly $1,000 for tiles, and
    > > > $1,2000 for coping. I don't remember, exactly, because I also had the

    > whole
    > > > pool replumbed, with new skimmer and all new equipment. Anyway, my

    > neighbor
    > > > had the fiberglass thing done years ago, and just a few months later

    > they
    > > > had it replastered. The fiberglass coating over plaster/concrete thing

    > is
    > > > nothing new, and it's as big a rip-off now as it's always been. Avoid

    > it at
    > > > all costs.
    > > >
    > > > Painting isn't much better, in most cases. Although some folks have

    > painted
    > > > their pools and had good results, most end up having to either remove

    > the
    > > > paint, or the plaster, within a few months to a few years, as this stuff
    > > > isn't designed to last more than 7 years or so.
    > > >
    > > > New plaster is your best bet, along with some new tile if you can. The
    > > > coping can probably be repaired if it's not too bad off.
    > > >
    > > > You might want to take a close look at your plumbing. If it's copper,

    > or it
    > > > needs repair which requires cutting up the pool, now is the time to do

    > it.
    > > >
    > > > Pagan

    > >
    > > Regarding the choice of a fiberglass coating and "it's as big a rip-off
    > > now as it's always been", is a statement I must take issue with.
    > > Fiberglass resurfacing, done properly with the proper resins and
    > > gelcoat will last up to 25 years, although it may need some cosmetic
    > > help after 15 or so years.

    >
    > You may be right, and there may be some great looking pools out there that
    > have been fiberglassed, but I haven't seen nor heard of any, and though I'm
    > not the omnipotent demigod of all pools, it's likely I would have at least
    > heard of good fiberglass recoating in S. CA.
    >
    > Seeing as how you are in the business, as well as your statement just below,
    > how long does your company guarantee it's product?
    >
    > > There is no plaster, used for resurfacing, that will last even 10
    > > years. That's why the guarantee for replastering is never greater than
    > > 4 years, and is usually 2 years, or even less. Plaster is a great
    > > solution for new pools because it will last a long time, but putting
    > > plaster on an old pool is an entirely different story. That's why the
    > > replaster guarantee is so short.

    >
    > That doesn't make sense. The warranty on my Panasonic microwave was only
    > good for a year, but after 15 years, it's still humming along.
    >
    > I fail to see the difference between plastering a new pool and replastering
    > an older pool, in regard to how long the plaster will last. The closest
    > thing to a reason you give is that the guarantee is short, but that could
    > have more to do with the potential lack of proper care of the pool and water
    > than anything else. I find it hard to believe that my pool lasted over 40
    > years with new plaster, and still looked great, but new plaster will not
    > "last" 10 years. What happens to the plaster?
    >
    > > I take issue with the statement that "as this stuff (paint)isn't
    > > designed to last more than 7 years or so." No POOL paint is designed or
    > > expected to last "7 years or so". Two or three years is the maximum,
    > > then it goes downhill rapidly. Unless, of course, you refer to lead
    > > based paint which could last 7 years, but that's no longer available in
    > > this country.

    >
    > That's the information I got from the manufacturers and pool owners.
    >
    > > Finally, I take issue with "The coping can probably be repaired if it's
    > > not too bad off." Coping cannot be repaired in any way, shape, or form;
    > > it can only be replaced.

    >
    > Strange, that you can make such a blanket statement without actually seeing
    > the coping for yourself, nor have any idea of just what kind of damage the
    > coping has. When your talking about a cash layout of $1,100 or more, which
    > is still a good chunk of money, it appears irresponsible to make such a
    > claim. The coping on my pool could have been repaired, however, I did not
    > care for the style or color anyway, so I chose to replace it. Of course,
    > had it been repaired, it wouldn't have looked perfect, and flaws would have
    > been noticable upon close examination, but few people go to a pool to stare
    > at the coping anyway, and if I'd liked the origional coping, or if I didn't
    > have the money to replace it, it would have been fixed, not replaced, and
    > I'd have another $1,100 to spend on other, more important things.
    >
    > Pagan
    >
    >

    The difference between plastering and replastering is the condition of
    the gunite or concrete. When concrete and gunite are new, plaster will
    last about 15 years before it begins to become stained, rough, and a
    haven for algae. When plaster is applied to old gunite or concrete
    which is dried out and, depending on the age of the pool (15 years vs.
    25 years), suffers from the onslaught of ground water, the bond is far
    less successful.

    Anyone who has owned a gunite or concrete pool for a long period of
    time knows that your statement: "my pool lasted over 40 years with new
    plaster, and still looked great" is both misleading and ludicrous.

    Since we're discussing the coping on an older concrete or gunite pool,
    we know that it is made of one foot wide concrete bullnose coping
    stones. There is no way to "repair" broken or crumbling concrete coping
    stones.

    Your original post in this thread Pagan sounded authoritive, but your
    knowledge of swimming pool restoration is really limited. Good luck
    with your newly restored swimming pool and enjoy the season. -Bill
     
    glassguy, Aug 26, 2005
    #16
  17. Stuart Benoff

    Guest

    Glassguy,

    Can the fiberglass surface be re-surfaced with fiberglass somehow?
    Given that the fiberglass is applied to the plaster and now the
    fiberglass is "fish scaling" (delaminating in little cresent moon
    shaped pieces the size of a quarter), what can they do? Chip out the
    fiberglass down to the plaster and re-fiberglass, or chip to the gunite
    and fiberglass. My thought was to chip to the gunite and plaster, but
    the thought of plaster again distresses me....

    MC
     
    , Aug 26, 2005
    #17
  18. Stuart Benoff

    Bob G. Guest

    On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 15:59:13 -0500, Richard J Kinch
    <> wrote:

    >Pagan writes:
    >
    >> Unless the guy has a gun in his hand, send him on his way.

    >
    >Yeah, for $1100 I'll come and empty it by hand with a bucket.


    ===============
    Now Richard,..... lol.....

    I honestly do not think you would work for so little money.... even
    using a 5 gallon bucket it would take you
    way to long to empty the pool...and your back would require about
    $3,000 dollars worth of Muscle Relaxants just to allow you to stand up

    But I do get your point.... lol

    Bob G.
     
    Bob G., Sep 22, 2005
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Dolchas
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    241
    Craven Morehead
    Jul 15, 2003
  2. No
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    724
  3. Tom
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    185
    SQLit
    Jul 21, 2004
  4. Replies:
    4
    Views:
    456
  5. jamesgangnc
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    707
Loading...

Share This Page