storage shed question

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by al, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. al

    al Guest

    All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.

    Thanks...
     
    al, Jul 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. al

    Guest

    On 26 Jul 2006 09:20:24 -0700, "al" <> wrote:

    >All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    >the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    >doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    >a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >
    >Thanks...

    The eave side becomes a waterfall when it is raining.
     
    , Jul 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. al

    Guest

    wrote:
    > On 26 Jul 2006 09:20:24 -0700, "al" <> wrote:
    >
    > >All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > >the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > >doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > >a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    > >
    > >Thanks...

    > The eave side becomes a waterfall when it is raining.


    Also, though its a small shed, the gable end is 'non-load-bearing', so
    putting the door there is simpler.

    Dave
     
    , Jul 26, 2006
    #3
  4. al

    Andrew Duane Guest

    Hmmm, I've had 3 sheds, and none of them had doors on the gable ends.
    All had doors on the eave sides. Perhaps it's just a size issue,
    putting a door in an 8' wall?

    al wrote:
    > All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >
    > Thanks...
     
    Andrew Duane, Jul 26, 2006
    #4
  5. al

    Chris Lewis Guest

    According to <>:
    >
    > wrote:
    > > On 26 Jul 2006 09:20:24 -0700, "al" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > > >the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > > >doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > > >a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    > > >
    > > >Thanks...

    > > The eave side becomes a waterfall when it is raining.

    >
    > Also, though its a small shed, the gable end is 'non-load-bearing', so
    > putting the door there is simpler.
    >
    > Dave
    >



    --
    Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
    It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
     
    Chris Lewis, Jul 26, 2006
    #5
  6. al

    Ether Jones Guest

    al wrote:
    > All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >
    > Thanks...


    I bought a 10' x 18' gambrel-roof shed 4 years ago.

    It came standard with a gable-end double door. I ordered it with an
    optional second double-door, on the eave side (18' side).

    The gable-end door is higher so I don't hit my head. The eave-side
    door isn't as high, and I have to be careful when entering & exiting.

    As far as water is concerning, neither door leaks.

    Having 2 doors makes it more convenient to access the shed when the
    riding mower is parked inside and blocking one of the doors.
     
    Ether Jones, Jul 26, 2006
    #6
  7. al

    PanHandler Guest

    "al" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.


    Mine is on the eave side, but I'll probably add one on the gable end to the
    left for better access.

    Here's my 8X12, with added shed roof, bench and sink.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joearnold/?saved=1
     
    PanHandler, Jul 26, 2006
    #7
  8. al

    PanHandler Guest

    PanHandler, Jul 26, 2006
    #8
  9. al

    Goedjn Guest

    On 26 Jul 2006 09:20:24 -0700, "al" <> wrote:

    >All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    >the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    >doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    >a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >
    >Thanks...


    Doorways on the gable end don't dump as much snow/water/ice
    on the heads of people going in and out.
     
    Goedjn, Jul 26, 2006
    #9
  10. al

    Guest

    al wrote:
    > All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >
    > Thanks...


    Great Topic, I just had a 10x12 Storage Shed built on my driveway with
    a gambrel roof, and the door on the gable end. And a workbench and eave
    storage.

    I have a small window and a skylight, but no overhead light, or power.

    That's my question, how many folks just run an extension cord into the
    shed from an exterior outlet for tools, light, etc. And how many had it
    properly wired by an electrical pro?

    Is there any obvious option that I am overlooking regarding electricity?
     
    , Jul 26, 2006
    #10
  11. Personally I favor the extension cord plan, you don't have to have it
    inspected, or taxed as it is a temporary structure. In my green house
    we wired it properly, but the hook-up is a 10 ga extension cord running
    to a gfi box mounted high on the wall of the house. The same goes for
    the water, it is plumbed on the inside but the hook-up is a hose. It
    permanently temporary.
     
    Eric in North TX, Jul 26, 2006
    #11
  12. al

    Kate Guest

    wrote:
    > al wrote:
    >
    >>All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    >>the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    >>doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    >>a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
    >>
    >>Thanks...

    >
    >
    > Great Topic, I just had a 10x12 Storage Shed built on my driveway with
    > a gambrel roof, and the door on the gable end. And a workbench and eave
    > storage.
    >
    > I have a small window and a skylight, but no overhead light, or power.
    >
    > That's my question, how many folks just run an extension cord into the
    > shed from an exterior outlet for tools, light, etc. And how many had it
    > properly wired by an electrical pro?
    >
    > Is there any obvious option that I am overlooking regarding electricity?
    >

    I ran an extension cord into the shed from an exterior outlet, that is
    covered by a lid.

    In the shed, I installed an outlet electrical strip, (no sure of what it
    is really called), and from it I have a radio plugged in, a security
    monitor, and extra slots for a heater, etc.

    Works great.

    Kate
     
    Kate, Jul 27, 2006
    #12
  13. al

    HerHusband Guest

    > All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does
    > the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side
    > doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting
    > a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.


    I built our shed many years ago. It's 8'x12' with the door centered on the
    12' side, under the roof eave. There are a couple of advantages I've noted
    over the years.

    1. Having the door centered on the long side of the building makes it
    easier to store items on the left and right side as you walk in. You don't
    have to go to the back of a 12' shed to get what you need. Much easier
    access.

    2. Having the door under the eave lets you stand in the doorway while it's
    raining, and helps keep water out of the shed if the door is open during a
    rainstorm.

    I think the main reason most "kit" sheds have doors on the gable end is so
    the roof can be lower. The shed has to be taller than the door to install a
    door on the eave side.

    As for power, I ran conduit underground from our house to our shed, and ran
    a 30 amp circuit to a subpanel in the shed. For now, I just have a couple
    of lights and some outlets. It's a nice feature when I have to go out to
    the shed at night, or need to plug in the charger for my lawnmower battery.

    Anthony
     
    HerHusband, Jul 28, 2006
    #13
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