Sledge design

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by The Medway Handyman, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    road.

    Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs, small
    surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,

    Built her the sledge from some scrap timber. Runners are 6 x 1 with
    aluminium strips.

    Wasn't as fast as I thought it would be, mind you, despite eating like a
    horse she doesn't weigh much.

    The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow runners or are
    you better off having wider ones to ride on top of the snow?

    Any Eskimos on the group?


    --
    Dave - The Medway Handyman
    www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
     
    The Medway Handyman, Dec 1, 2010
    #1
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  2. The Medway Handyman

    ARWadsworth Guest

    ARWadsworth, Dec 1, 2010
    #2
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  3. The Medway Handyman

    Huge Guest

    On 2010-12-01, The Medway Handyman <> wrote:
    > Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    > road.
    >
    > Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    > things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs, small
    > surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,
    >
    > Built her the sledge from some scrap timber. Runners are 6 x 1 with
    > aluminium strips.


    I have a suspicion for some reason that aluminium may not be suitable; does
    it bind to ice, or similar?


    --
    Today is Setting Orange, the 43rd day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3176
    "Always mount a scratch monkey."
     
    Huge, Dec 1, 2010
    #3
  4. The Medway Handyman

    Jim K Guest

    On Dec 1, 2:23 pm, "The Medway Handyman" <davidno-spam-
    > wrote:
    > Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    > road.
    >
    > Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    > things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs, small
    > surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,
    >
    > Built her the sledge from some scrap timber. Runners are 6 x 1 with
    > aluminium strips.
    >
    > Wasn't as fast as I thought it would be, mind you, despite eating like a
    > horse she doesn't weigh much.
    >
    > The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow runners or are
    > you better off having wider ones to ride on top of the snow?
    >
    > Any Eskimos on the group?
    >
    > --
    > Dave - The Medway Handymanwww.medwayhandyman.co.uk


    have you had a search back on here? sure this came up last winter?

    Jim K
     
    Jim K, Dec 1, 2010
    #4
  5. The Medway Handyman

    Bob Martin Guest

    in 1005316 20101201 142337 "The Medway Handyman" <> wrote:
    >Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    >road.
    >
    >Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    >things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs, small
    >surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,



    Nothing beats an inflated truck or tractor inner-tube.
     
    Bob Martin, Dec 1, 2010
    #5
  6. The Medway Handyman

    Adrian C Guest

    On 01/12/2010 15:01, Jim K wrote:

    > have you had a search back on here? sure this came up last winter?
    >


    Yeah, but this year the regular 'air conditioning' thread failed to take
    flight - and this is to make up for that.

    Actually, I remember last snow season (Feb?) hearing a few horrible
    stories of kids killed on make-shift sleds, including one made out of a
    upturned roof removed from an old Ford Transit van.

    Be careful out there!

    --
    Adrian C
     
    Adrian C, Dec 1, 2010
    #6
  7. On Wed, 01 Dec 2010 14:31:38 +0000, Mike Clarke wrote:

    > That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's soft
    > and squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets frozen
    > hard then narrow ones would be better.


    Agreed, the snow we have is deep dry powder, only very slightly
    sticky. Even after being underneath a sledge with a 13 stone on top,
    it'll still break up into powder. Great for skiing but useless for
    building...

    As to sledges we have a plastic barrel cut in half length wise and
    Weez II plastic ones. The 1/2 barrel is more fun, faster, less stable
    but easier to steer it needs deep snow though, there was about 12" on
    our hill yesterday. The Weez II's tend to just go in straight lines
    but I can imagine on harder shallower snow they would be very good
    and the 1/2 barrel
    uncontrollable.

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Weez-Snow-Sledge-Toboggan-Two-Person-/2507347770
    99

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
     
    Dave Liquorice, Dec 1, 2010
    #7
  8. On Wed, 01 Dec 2010 15:12:58 +0000, Adrian C wrote:

    > Actually, I remember last snow season (Feb?) hearing a few horrible
    > stories of kids killed on make-shift sleds, including one made out of a
    > upturned roof removed from an old Ford Transit van.


    IIRC a Land Rover roof and the mistake was not to make sure the
    bottom of the hill had a decent run off area and did't have a wire
    fence across the bottom of it...

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
     
    Dave Liquorice, Dec 1, 2010
    #8
  9. The Medway Handyman

    Bob Minchin Guest

    Mike Clarke wrote:
    > The Medway Handyman wrote:
    >
    >> The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow runners or
    >> are you better off having wider ones to ride on top of the snow?

    >
    > That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's soft and
    > squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets frozen hard then
    > narrow ones would be better.
    >

    How about a multigrade design. V section runners should present a narrow
    strip on harder snow and ice and the wider part should help it from
    digging into soft snow too much. Might have to play with the angles -
    say about 120 degrees included to start with. Adjustable would be really
    posh.
    No sign of snow here in Southampton
    Bob
     
    Bob Minchin, Dec 1, 2010
    #9
  10. Adrian C wrote:
    > On 01/12/2010 15:01, Jim K wrote:
    >
    >> have you had a search back on here? sure this came up last winter?
    >>

    >
    > Yeah, but this year the regular 'air conditioning' thread failed to
    > take flight - and this is to make up for that.
    >
    > Actually, I remember last snow season (Feb?) hearing a few horrible
    > stories of kids killed on make-shift sleds, including one made out of
    > a upturned roof removed from an old Ford Transit van.


    Did you ever see the episode of Le Salvager where he built a boat from a
    Transit GRP roof?


    --
    Dave - The Medway Handyman
    www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
     
    The Medway Handyman, Dec 1, 2010
    #10
  11. The Medway Handyman

    Lawrence Guest

    "Huge" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2010-12-01, The Medway Handyman <>
    > wrote:
    >> Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    >> road.
    >>
    >> Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    >> things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs,
    >> small
    >> surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,
    >>
    >> Built her the sledge from some scrap timber. Runners are 6 x 1 with
    >> aluminium strips.

    >
    > I have a suspicion for some reason that aluminium may not be suitable;
    > does
    > it bind to ice, or similar?

    Agreed. Aluminium is wrong. Its specific heat capacity is too small. Mild
    steel is fine but, of course, will need rubbing down before each use.

    Lawrence
     
    Lawrence, Dec 1, 2010
    #11
  12. The Medway Handyman

    ARWadsworth Guest

    Adrian C <> wrote:
    > On 01/12/2010 15:01, Jim K wrote:
    >
    >> have you had a search back on here? sure this came up last winter?
    >>

    >
    > Yeah, but this year the regular 'air conditioning' thread failed to
    > take flight - and this is to make up for that.
    >
    > Actually, I remember last snow season (Feb?) hearing a few horrible
    > stories of kids killed on make-shift sleds, including one made out of
    > a upturned roof removed from an old Ford Transit van.
    >
    > Be careful out there!


    It was in Rotherham last Feburary. One girl died.

    Don't more people die every year by going into ice covered water to try to
    save their dogs than in sledging accidents?
    --
    Adam
     
    ARWadsworth, Dec 2, 2010
    #12
  13. Bob Minchin wrote:
    > Mike Clarke wrote:
    >> The Medway Handyman wrote:
    >>
    >>> The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow
    >>> runners or are you better off having wider ones to ride on top of
    >>> the snow?

    >>
    >> That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's
    >> soft and squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets
    >> frozen hard then narrow ones would be better.
    >>

    > How about a multigrade design. V section runners should present a
    > narrow strip on harder snow and ice and the wider part should help it
    > from digging into soft snow too much. Might have to play with the
    > angles - say about 120 degrees included to start with. Adjustable
    > would be really posh.


    Vee section sounds great! Getting the curve at the front would be
    interesting....

    > No sign of snow here in Southampton


    How about now?

    :)


    --
    Dave - The Medway Handyman
    www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
     
    The Medway Handyman, Dec 2, 2010
    #13
  14. The Medway Handyman

    PeterC Guest

    On Wed, 01 Dec 2010 14:31:38 +0000, Mike Clarke wrote:

    > The Medway Handyman wrote:
    >
    >> The plastic sledges seem faster.  Is the idea to have narrow runners or
    >> are you better off having wider ones to ride on top of the snow?

    >
    > That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's soft and
    > squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets frozen hard then
    > narrow ones would be better.


    Last one we had was the only one locally that would run on an inch of fluffy
    snow.
    It was a sheet of varnished ply (can't remember th dimensions as it was
    about 50 years ago) with thin ply nailed under the front end and held up in
    a curve with string. A small length of pointy batten in the middle of the
    back end would have made it easier to steer (like a skeg) but not on such
    shallow snow.
    It went rather fast and took some controlling to stop it turning and acting
    as a shovel.
    --
    Peter.
    The gods will stay away
    whilst religions hold sway
     
    PeterC, Dec 2, 2010
    #14
  15. The Medway Handyman

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Dec 1, 2:31 pm, Mike Clarke <> wrote:

    > That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's soft and
    > squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets frozen hard then
    > narrow ones would be better.


    Agreed. If you've got a one day flurry of soft snow in a big park
    (i.e. not all trampled) then a cheap moulded plastic sledge beats
    grandad's beautifully hand-crafted wooden one with narrow runners.
     
    Andy Dingley, Dec 2, 2010
    #15
  16. The Medway Handyman

    Dave Guest

    On 01/12/2010 16:56, Bob Minchin wrote:

    > No sign of snow here in Southampton



    Not on topic, but how do you find road signs that tell you how to get
    out of the city? Daughter lives just down the coast in Portsmouth and we
    paid a visit there some years ago and I couldn't find my way out. It
    reminded me about visiting Glasgow many years ago, I had the same
    problem there, so I picked a road and drove along it until I found some
    road signs to take me back to New Cumnock.

    Dave
     
    Dave, Dec 2, 2010
    #16
  17. The Medway Handyman

    Bob Minchin Guest

    The Medway Handyman wrote:
    > Bob Minchin wrote:
    >> Mike Clarke wrote:
    >>> The Medway Handyman wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow
    >>>> runners or are you better off having wider ones to ride on top of
    >>>> the snow?
    >>>
    >>> That depends on if you have the right sort of snow or not. If it's
    >>> soft and squashy then wide runners are probably best but if it gets
    >>> frozen hard then narrow ones would be better.
    >>>

    >> How about a multigrade design. V section runners should present a
    >> narrow strip on harder snow and ice and the wider part should help it
    >> from digging into soft snow too much. Might have to play with the
    >> angles - say about 120 degrees included to start with. Adjustable
    >> would be really posh.

    >
    > Vee section sounds great! Getting the curve at the front would be
    > interesting....
    >
    >> No sign of snow here in Southampton

    >
    > How about now?
    >
    > :)
    >
    >

    About 120mm this morning. I think the last time we had this much was 1985
    Bob
     
    Bob Minchin, Dec 2, 2010
    #17
  18. The Medway Handyman

    Ron Lowe Guest

    On 01/12/2010 14:23, The Medway Handyman wrote:
    > Couldn't get to my job today, on top of a steep hill on an ungritted back
    > road.
    >
    > Took my granddaughter sledging instead. Amazing to see the variety of
    > things used as sledges; rubble sacks, estate agents signs, road signs, small
    > surfboards, wheelie bin lids, trays,
    >
    > Built her the sledge from some scrap timber. Runners are 6 x 1 with
    > aluminium strips.
    >
    > Wasn't as fast as I thought it would be, mind you, despite eating like a
    > horse she doesn't weigh much.
    >
    > The plastic sledges seem faster. Is the idea to have narrow runners or are
    > you better off having wider ones to ride on top of the snow?
    >
    > Any Eskimos on the group?
    >
    >


    Old car bonnets go like stink...

    --
    Ron
     
    Ron Lowe, Dec 2, 2010
    #18
  19. The Medway Handyman

    Terry Casey Guest

    In article <id8gr9$ods$-september.org>, says...
    >
    > On 01/12/2010 16:56, Bob Minchin wrote:
    >
    > > No sign of snow here in Southampton

    >
    >
    > Not on topic, but how do you find road signs that tell you how to get
    > out of the city? Daughter lives just down the coast in Portsmouth and we
    > paid a visit there some years ago and I couldn't find my way out.


    Didn't you know where you'd come from ...?

    I'm sure I've found plenty of signs when I've been in Portsmouth and A3, A27 and London
    have a sort of 'gets-you-out-of-town' feel to them ...

    Or, for the coastal routes, which seem to suit you better, the dockyard and ferries are
    well signed. When you get to water, turn left or right as appropriate ...

    >
    > It reminded me about visiting Glasgow many years ago, I had the same
    > problem there, so I picked a road and drove along it until I found some
    > road signs to take me back to New Cumnock.
    >


    Dunno about that - it's foreign, innit?

    Now let me see ...

    Ah yes! If I reach over the back there's this Road Atlas of Great Britain thingy, should
    give a few hints ...

    Surely, in any large town, driving as far as posible in a straight line should get you
    somewhere - even if it's The Solent - that gives you a point of reference.

    It's also useful if you know where North is but I admit that isn't always easy!

    You must have had some way of finding your destination in Portsmouth and Glasgow, so why
    not do the same thing backwards? Or, in Portsmouth, ask your daughter ...?

    --

    Terry
     
    Terry Casey, Dec 2, 2010
    #19
  20. The Medway Handyman

    D.M.Chapman Guest

    In article <zlIJo.61208$2>,
    ARWadsworth <> wrote:
    >Adrian C <> wrote:
    >> On 01/12/2010 15:01, Jim K wrote:
    >>
    >>> have you had a search back on here? sure this came up last winter?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Yeah, but this year the regular 'air conditioning' thread failed to
    >> take flight - and this is to make up for that.
    >>
    >> Actually, I remember last snow season (Feb?) hearing a few horrible
    >> stories of kids killed on make-shift sleds, including one made out of
    >> a upturned roof removed from an old Ford Transit van.
    >>
    >> Be careful out there!

    >
    >It was in Rotherham last Feburary. One girl died.
    >
    >Don't more people die every year by going into ice covered water to try to
    >save their dogs than in sledging accidents?


    Talking of ice covered water... wtf:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-car-pensioner-struggles-peer-windscreen.html

    (the bit at the bottom with the canal)

    Darren
     
    D.M.Chapman, Dec 2, 2010
    #20
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