Shredding/chipping leylandii

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Tim Downie, Feb 23, 2007.

  1. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    with, probably about 3 skip loads.

    Next problem is how to dispose of them.

    Options include:

    o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.

    o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.

    o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    the hedge would probably choke his machine.

    o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    of it.

    Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    (http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?

    Tim
     
    Tim Downie, Feb 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. Tim Downie

    Adrian Guest

    HI Tim

    On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 12:26:04 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    <> wrote:

    >Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    >with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    >
    >Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    >
    >Options include:
    >
    >o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.
    >
    >o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.
    >
    >o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    >plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    >that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    >the hedge would probably choke his machine.
    >
    >o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    >I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    >thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    >of it.
    >
    >Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    >(http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    >job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?
    >
    >Tim
    >


    Quickest and tidyiest is a _proper_ shredder -
    We had 12 x 40ft pines removed just after Christmas -
    proper Tree Surgeons came with a unimog-mounted, hydraulically driver
    shredder which ate everything from 4" diameter down.

    made one heck of a noise - and a large pile of chippings...

    Back at the last house I did the 'bonfire' route - possible a bit
    unecological - but very satisfying !

    Regards
    Adrian
     
    Adrian, Feb 23, 2007
    #2
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  3. Tim Downie

    Guest

    On Feb 23, 12:26 pm, "Tim Downie" <>
    wrote:
    > o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    > plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    > that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    > the hedge would probably choke his machine.


    You spoke to the wrong person. We had South Bucks Tree Surgeons who
    came with a huge trailer based shredder that dumped the chippings into
    another trailer. Think of a combine harvester throwing the corn out of
    the spout. They also had an "angle grinder on a wheelbarrow" stump
    grinder to lower the level of the remains so we could cover them with
    soil.

    MBQ
     
    , Feb 23, 2007
    #3
  4. Tim Downie

    Guest

    Adrian <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 12:26:04 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    > >with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    > >
    > >Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    > >
    > >Options include:
    > >
    > >o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.
    > >
    > >o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.
    > >
    > >o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    > >plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    > >that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    > >the hedge would probably choke his machine.
    > >
    > >o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    > >I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    > >thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    > >of it.
    > >
    > >Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    > >(http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    > >job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?
    > >

    > Quickest and tidyiest is a _proper_ shredder -
    > We had 12 x 40ft pines removed just after Christmas -
    > proper Tree Surgeons came with a unimog-mounted, hydraulically driver
    > shredder which ate everything from 4" diameter down.
    >

    What a waste of good heating fuel! OK, so it's a bit more labour
    using the smaller bits but when we fell trees we make firewood down to
    2" diameter or even less.

    Having used everything down to that size you can shred the rest with a
    'lighter' shredder.

    > made one heck of a noise - and a large pile of chippings...
    >
    > Back at the last house I did the 'bonfire' route - possible a bit
    > unecological - but very satisfying !
    >
    > Regards
    > Adrian


    --
    Chris Green
     
    , Feb 23, 2007
    #4
  5. Tim Downie

    Adrian Guest

    HI Chris

    On 23 Feb 2007 13:12:46 GMT, wrote:

    >Adrian <> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 12:26:04 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    >> >with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    >> >
    >> >Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    >> >
    >> >Options include:
    >> >
    >> >o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.
    >> >
    >> >o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.
    >> >
    >> >o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    >> >plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    >> >that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    >> >the hedge would probably choke his machine.
    >> >
    >> >o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    >> >I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    >> >thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    >> >of it.
    >> >
    >> >Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    >> >(http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    >> >job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?
    >> >

    >> Quickest and tidyiest is a _proper_ shredder -
    >> We had 12 x 40ft pines removed just after Christmas -
    >> proper Tree Surgeons came with a unimog-mounted, hydraulically driver
    >> shredder which ate everything from 4" diameter down.
    >>

    >What a waste of good heating fuel! OK, so it's a bit more labour
    >using the smaller bits but when we fell trees we make firewood down to
    >2" diameter or even less.
    >
    >Having used everything down to that size you can shred the rest with a
    >'lighter' shredder.


    True - but in our case we still have a ginormous pile of 3ft logs
    waiting to be converted into fire-sized logs.

    Have made friends with a nice man up the road who owns a
    petrol-powered log-splitter <g>

    Back in Suffolk I took out a couple of hundred yards of mature (even
    geriatric !) leylandii - and decided that (as firewood) they were more
    trouble than they were worth. Even after several years drying they
    were still full of sticky sap that got everywhere, and they didn't
    burn all that well either in our stove.....

    Take care !

    Adrian
    West Cork - Ireland
     
    Adrian, Feb 23, 2007
    #5
  6. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    "Adrian" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Quickest and tidyiest is a _proper_ shredder -


    I suspect I just need to do a bit more phoning around.

    > We had 12 x 40ft pines removed just after Christmas -
    > proper Tree Surgeons came with a unimog-mounted, hydraulically driver
    > shredder which ate everything from 4" diameter down.


    I want one! ;-)

    Any ball park figures on how much I should expect to pay to hire such a
    beast (& operator)?

    Cheers!

    Tim
     
    Tim Downie, Feb 23, 2007
    #6
  7. Tim Downie

    Huge Guest

    On 2007-02-23, Tim Downie <> wrote:
    > Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    > with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    >
    > Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    >
    > Options include:
    >
    > o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.
    >
    > o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.
    >
    > o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    > plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    > that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    > the hedge would probably choke his machine.
    >
    > o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    > I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    > thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    > of it.
    >
    > Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    > (http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    > job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?


    No. I have a 2kW shredder and it's a useless pain. It blocks up
    all the time and won't shred anything thicker than your thumb. Oh,
    and the safety features are a PITA, too. You can't get anything with
    side branches into the feed chute and it's a right pain to take apart
    when it blocks up.

    If you can't burn it, I'd get a man with a big shredder in. When we
    had our oak tree cut down (too close to the house), they shredded
    everything less than about 6" diameter. We kept the shreddings and
    used them as mulch.




    --
    Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those
    who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this
    or that problem will never be solved by science.
    [email me at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
     
    Huge, Feb 23, 2007
    #7
  8. Tim Downie

    Guest

    Adrian <> wrote:
    >
    > Back in Suffolk I took out a couple of hundred yards of mature (even
    > geriatric !) leylandii - and decided that (as firewood) they were more
    > trouble than they were worth. Even after several years drying they
    > were still full of sticky sap that got everywhere, and they didn't
    > burn all that well either in our stove.....
    >

    That's what we're burning and it's pretty good actually. It needs
    seasoning well (preferably 12 months) but in that it's very little
    different from most wood. It's much better than pine and seems rather
    better than aspen. I'm surpised you had difficulty burning it after
    'several years', not our experience at all.

    --
    Chris Green
     
    , Feb 23, 2007
    #8
  9. Tim Downie

    AJH Guest

    On 23 Feb 2007 13:12:46 GMT, wrote:

    >What a waste of good heating fuel! OK, so it's a bit more labour
    >using the smaller bits but when we fell trees we make firewood down to
    >2" diameter or even less.
    >
    >Having used everything down to that size you can shred the rest with a
    >'lighter' shredder.


    Yes in the absence of a chipper snedding the branches out and cutting
    the logs down to ~30mm diameter for fuel minimises bulk. The remaining
    lop and top can then be diced in the back of a small vehicle or even
    diced on the ground and then forked into a dumpy sack.

    We reckon on about 15:1 reduction in volume by chipping and 3:1 by
    dicing.

    AJH
     
    AJH, Feb 23, 2007
    #9
  10. Tim Downie

    AJH Guest

    On 23 Feb 2007 13:26:24 GMT, wrote:

    >Adrian <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Back in Suffolk I took out a couple of hundred yards of mature (even
    >> geriatric !) leylandii - and decided that (as firewood) they were more
    >> trouble than they were worth. Even after several years drying they
    >> were still full of sticky sap that got everywhere, and they didn't
    >> burn all that well either in our stove.....
    >>

    >That's what we're burning and it's pretty good actually. It needs
    >seasoning well (preferably 12 months) but in that it's very little
    >different from most wood. It's much better than pine and seems rather
    >better than aspen. I'm surpised you had difficulty burning it after
    >'several years', not our experience at all.


    I agree, leylandii is not a bad fuel if dried and kept dry, softwoods
    being less dense seem to re absorb moisture if left uncovered.

    AJH
     
    AJH, Feb 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Tim Downie

    AJH Guest

    On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 13:21:56 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    <> wrote:

    >Any ball park figures on how much I should expect to pay to hire such a
    >beast (& operator)?


    About GBP200/day +VAT from a small operator in NW Surrey and that
    would include removal of 1 transit sized load of chip (say 2.5m^3).

    AJH
     
    AJH, Feb 23, 2007
    #11
  12. Tim Downie

    Steve Firth Guest

    On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 13:19:32 +0000, Adrian wrote:

    > Back in Suffolk I took out a couple of hundred yards of mature (even
    > geriatric !) leylandii - and decided that (as firewood) they were more
    > trouble than they were worth. Even after several years drying they
    > were still full of sticky sap that got everywhere, and they didn't
    > burn all that well either in our stove.....


    Leylandii didn't burn well? Your stove needed to be replaced.

    Leylandii, apply match, stand well back.
     
    Steve Firth, Feb 23, 2007
    #12
  13. Tim Downie

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 23 Feb, 12:26, "Tim Downie" <>
    wrote:

    > o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.


    Cost one of my neighbours his E-type Jag

    _Don't_ burn Leylandii unless you know what you're doing, i.e. you've
    burned it before and you have adequate space to do it in (several
    times more than you think). Leylandii is chock-full of resins and
    burns somewhere between ferociously and explosively. _Many_ people get
    seriously surprised by how out of control a Leylandii bonfire can get.
     
    Andy Dingley, Feb 23, 2007
    #13
  14. On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 12:26:04 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    <> wrote:

    |!Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    |!with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    |!
    |!Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    |!
    |!Options include:
    |!
    |!o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.
    |!
    |!o Skips. Pros - easy. Cons - expensive.
    |!
    |!o Hire a chipper (& operator) and disposal of chips in garden. Pros -
    |!plenty of space to use the chippings. Cons - man came out today and did
    |!that sucking through the teeth bit and said that the bushieness & density of
    |!the hedge would probably choke his machine.
    |!
    |!o Buy a garden shredder and shred what we can. Pros - relatively cheap and
    |!I end up with a shredder at the end of it. Cons - won't handle the
    |!thicker/bushier stuff and I might end up with a *broken* shredder at the end
    |!of it.
    |!
    |!Any other suggestions? Would something like this
    |!(http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/partNumber/7218400.htm) be up to the
    |!job (assuming we avoid stuffing anything too thick down its throat)?

    Our local tip (Domestic Refuse Site), FREE, has a place for green waste,
    The would take a Leylandii no problem. Every so often the bring in a
    *huge* shredder and haul everything away to compost
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk>
    20,000 free e-books at Project Gutenberg! http://www.gutenberg.org
    For Yorkshire Dialect go to www.hyphenologist.co.uk/songs/
    http://www.gutenberg.org/author/John_Hartley
    http://www.gutenberg.org/author/F_W_Moorman
     
    Dave Fawthrop, Feb 23, 2007
    #14
  15. Tim Downie

    dennis@home Guest

    "Andy Dingley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 23 Feb, 12:26, "Tim Downie" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.

    >
    > Cost one of my neighbours his E-type Jag
    >
    > _Don't_ burn Leylandii unless you know what you're doing, i.e. you've
    > burned it before and you have adequate space to do it in (several
    > times more than you think). Leylandii is chock-full of resins and
    > burns somewhere between ferociously and explosively. _Many_ people get
    > seriously surprised by how out of control a Leylandii bonfire can get.
    >


    I have had the whole of a galvanised steel fire bin glowing red-white
    burning conifer bits.
    They burn so well that you get a blast of red hot flame several feet in the
    air and no smoke if you do it properly.
     
    dennis@home, Feb 23, 2007
    #15
  16. Tim Downie

    Adrian Guest

    HI Tim

    On Fri, 23 Feb 2007 13:21:56 -0000, "Tim Downie"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Adrian" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >> Quickest and tidyiest is a _proper_ shredder -

    >
    >I suspect I just need to do a bit more phoning around.
    >
    >> We had 12 x 40ft pines removed just after Christmas -
    >> proper Tree Surgeons came with a unimog-mounted, hydraulically driver
    >> shredder which ate everything from 4" diameter down.

    >
    >I want one! ;-)


    Don't we all <g>
    The unimog was a nice piece of kit also......
    .....but too many toys here already !

    >
    >Any ball park figures on how much I should expect to pay to hire such a
    >beast (& operator)?


    The whole job cost us 800 euro - that was three men plus the 'mog and
    chipper - and they worked a good 'full day'.....

    If it was only one or two of the trees I might have had a go myself -
    but they were a bit on the big side (three of them were about 15"
    diameter) - and the telephone line was dangerously close to where the
    trees had to fall - so I chickened out !

    However - I shall be logging up the remains - when it stops raining
    for long enough. Even the locals are saying it's been a particularly
    wet Autumn - Winter......

    Ah well

    Adrian
    >
    >Cheers!
    >
    >Tim
    >
     
    Adrian, Feb 23, 2007
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    "Tim Downie" <> writes:
    > Having grubbed out my hedge, I now have a huge pile of branches to deal
    > with, probably about 3 skip loads.
    >
    > Next problem is how to dispose of them.
    >
    > Options include:
    >
    > o Big bonfire. Pros- cheap. Cons - no good site handy for a bonfire.


    A friend of mine did that. It was followed by a very large
    insurance claim to get all the neighbours' cars resprayed,
    on which the fall-out had landed.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
     
    Andrew Gabriel, Feb 23, 2007
    #17
  18. Tim Downie

    Adrian Guest

    Hi Chris
    On 23 Feb 2007 13:26:24 GMT, wrote:

    >Adrian <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Back in Suffolk I took out a couple of hundred yards of mature (even
    >> geriatric !) leylandii - and decided that (as firewood) they were more
    >> trouble than they were worth. Even after several years drying they
    >> were still full of sticky sap that got everywhere, and they didn't
    >> burn all that well either in our stove.....
    >>

    >That's what we're burning and it's pretty good actually. It needs
    >seasoning well (preferably 12 months) but in that it's very little
    >different from most wood. It's much better than pine and seems rather
    >better than aspen. I'm surpised you had difficulty burning it after
    >'several years', not our experience at all.


    Oh - very strange.
    We also had a supply of silver birch (from the local council / heath
    management people) - and, compared to that, ISTR that I found the
    leylandii a waste of time..... even after a couple of years
    seasoning..

    Only got a little woodburner in the new house out here - so it's 'for
    fun' rather than whole-house heating as back in the UK. We're in the
    process of installing a ground-water heat-pump as well....

    Regards
    Adrian
     
    Adrian, Feb 23, 2007
    #18
  19. Tim Downie

    Steve Firth Guest

    On 23 Feb 2007 13:24:07 GMT, Huge wrote:

    > No. I have a 2kW shredder and it's a useless pain. It blocks up
    > all the time and won't shred anything thicker than your thumb. Oh,
    > and the safety features are a PITA, too. You can't get anything with
    > side branches into the feed chute and it's a right pain to take apart
    > when it blocks up.


    Hmm, I've got a 2.5kW shredder and it's fine. It's also easy to take apart,
    just one big thumbscrew to undo and it hinges open at the cutting plate.
    The knives are double sided and secured using allen bolts and it wolfs down
    branches up to 1" dia. The blades are mounted on a heavy flywheel so it
    doesn't tend to jam unless one is daft.

    However the big models have powered feeders and can handle huge bits of
    wood and can be stacked with branches then you walk away and load some
    more. That's a huge time saving over any noddy household device. Since I've
    got to thin out upwards of a tonne of wood a year I've been looking at
    buying one for the PTO on my tractor but they cost big bucks. At present I
    use a billhook and muscle power to reduce branches to brash and logs usable
    in the log burner.
     
    Steve Firth, Feb 23, 2007
    #19
  20. Tim Downie

    Huge Guest

    On 2007-02-23, Steve Firth <%steve%@malloc.co.uk> wrote:
    > On 23 Feb 2007 13:24:07 GMT, Huge wrote:
    >
    >> No. I have a 2kW shredder and it's a useless pain. It blocks up
    >> all the time and won't shred anything thicker than your thumb. Oh,
    >> and the safety features are a PITA, too. You can't get anything with
    >> side branches into the feed chute and it's a right pain to take apart
    >> when it blocks up.

    >
    > Hmm, I've got a 2.5kW shredder and it's fine. It's also easy to take apart,
    > just one big thumbscrew to undo and it hinges open at the cutting plate.


    Mine's the same, except the screw's about 60mm long, so needs unscrewing
    about 30 or 40 turns. I'd cut it shorter, except in goes into the control
    box to act as the interlock to stop it starting when you've the cover open.

    What I should do is take the feed chute off and throw it away and cheat
    the interlock so I can cut the thumbscrew down to a sensible length.

    When I find the round tuit, anyway.


    --
    Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those
    who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this
    or that problem will never be solved by science.
    [email me at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
     
    Huge, Feb 23, 2007
    #20
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