Sealing radiator leak?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Steve, Dec 2, 2003.

  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    We have a new radiator in our new kitchen, but its leaking where a valve
    screws into it. Can I use PTFE tape on the threads. or is there something
    more suitable?
    Thanks.
     
    Steve, Dec 2, 2003
    #1
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  2. Steve

    Andy Hall Guest

    On Tue, 2 Dec 2003 23:51:47 -0000, "Steve" <>
    wrote:

    >We have a new radiator in our new kitchen, but its leaking where a valve
    >screws into it. Can I use PTFE tape on the threads. or is there something
    >more suitable?
    >Thanks.
    >


    That's fine/

    Make sure that you wrap 6-10 turns of tape onto the thread and in the
    correct direction. This should be so that the free end of the tape
    "points" anticlockwise as you look at the radiator. Then as you
    screw in the fitting, the tape will tend to tighten.

    Don't forget to add inhibitor when you refill the system.....






    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
     
    Andy Hall, Dec 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. Steve

    PoP Guest

    On Tue, 2 Dec 2003 23:51:47 -0000, "Steve" <>
    wrote:

    >We have a new radiator in our new kitchen, but its leaking where a valve
    >screws into it. Can I use PTFE tape on the threads. or is there something
    >more suitable?


    Are you sure the valve has been fully tightened onto the radiator?
    Might be worth putting a spanner on it to see if it can be tightened
    slightly (remember to use another spanner on the other side of the
    joint to counteract the tightening pressure - you wouldn't want to
    yank the valve off the pipework!).

    PoP
     
    PoP, Dec 3, 2003
    #3
  4. Steve

    Colin M Guest

    The threaded section where the valve attaches to the radiator uses the
    conical face of the mating surfaces to seal, not the thread. Adding PTFE to
    the thread won't help much.

    Best to open it up and smear a bit of Boss White on the face of the joint
    and retighten.

    Colin M
     
    Colin M, Dec 3, 2003
    #4
  5. Steve

    Andy Hall Guest

    On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 10:14:08 +0000 (UTC), "Colin M"
    <> wrote:

    >The threaded section where the valve attaches to the radiator uses the
    >conical face of the mating surfaces to seal, not the thread. Adding PTFE to
    >the thread won't help much.
    >
    >Best to open it up and smear a bit of Boss White on the face of the joint
    >and retighten.
    >
    >Colin M
    >

    I think that you are confusing two things here, Colin.

    The threaded connection, which is the problem the OP describes, if
    leaking, would benefit from being re-done with PTFE tape.

    The conical joint between the tail and the valve *should* seal on a
    metal to metal contact if it is clean . Sometimes they don't and no
    matter how much they are tightened there can be a tiny seepage. In
    this case, some sealant such as Boss White or a specific PTFE liquid
    sealant usually does the trick.


    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
     
    Andy Hall, Dec 3, 2003
    #5
  6. Steve

    Colin M Guest

    On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 11:21:15 +0000, Andy Hall <>
    assembled some random characters on their keyboard which said:

    >I think that you are confusing two things here, Colin.
    >
    >The threaded connection, which is the problem the OP describes, if
    >leaking, would benefit from being re-done with PTFE tape.
    >
    >The conical joint between the tail and the valve *should* seal on a
    >metal to metal contact if it is clean . Sometimes they don't and no
    >matter how much they are tightened there can be a tiny seepage. In
    >this case, some sealant such as Boss White or a specific PTFE liquid
    >sealant usually does the trick.
    >
    >
    >.andy


    Andy

    I assumed because the OP wrote "radiator ... it's leaking where a
    valve screws into it" that he meant the valve to rad coupling which
    relies on the mating surfaces rather than the pipe to valve which
    relies on an olive. The only joint I found PTFE tape helps seal is the
    threaded section into the rad itself.

    Colin M
    Reply to group, or if email required, replace the abuse with broxie
     
    Colin M, Dec 3, 2003
    #6
  7. Steve

    Andy Hall Guest

    On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 17:29:13 +0000 (UTC), Colin M
    <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 11:21:15 +0000, Andy Hall <>
    >assembled some random characters on their keyboard which said:
    >
    >>I think that you are confusing two things here, Colin.
    >>
    >>The threaded connection, which is the problem the OP describes, if
    >>leaking, would benefit from being re-done with PTFE tape.
    >>
    >>The conical joint between the tail and the valve *should* seal on a
    >>metal to metal contact if it is clean . Sometimes they don't and no
    >>matter how much they are tightened there can be a tiny seepage. In
    >>this case, some sealant such as Boss White or a specific PTFE liquid
    >>sealant usually does the trick.
    >>
    >>
    >>.andy

    >
    >Andy
    >
    >I assumed because the OP wrote "radiator ... it's leaking where a
    >valve screws into it" that he meant the valve to rad coupling which
    >relies on the mating surfaces rather than the pipe to valve which
    >relies on an olive. The only joint I found PTFE tape helps seal is the
    >threaded section into the rad itself.
    >
    >Colin M
    >Reply to group, or if email required, replace the abuse with broxie


    Agreed. Definitely PTFE tape is not useful for the valve to tail
    joint, and I realised that that was what you meant.




    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
     
    Andy Hall, Dec 3, 2003
    #7
  8. Steve

    NJF Guest

    > Agreed. Definitely PTFE tape is not useful for the valve to tail
    > joint, and I realised that that was what you meant.
    >
    > .andy


    Depends on the rad, one of the guys here got some cast rads that have
    parallel threads and PTFE was useless, ended up using locktite 577.

    Niel.
     
    NJF, Dec 3, 2003
    #8
  9. Steve

    NJF Guest

    > Agreed. Definitely PTFE tape is not useful for the valve to tail
    > joint, and I realised that that was what you meant.
    >
    > .andy


    Depends on the rad, one of the guys here got some cast rads that have
    parallel threads and PTFE was useless, ended up using locktite 577.

    Niel.
     
    NJF, Dec 3, 2003
    #9
  10. Steve

    Roger Mills Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:bqj8ih$22j6ov$-berlin.de...
    > We have a new radiator in our new kitchen, but its leaking where a valve
    > screws into it. Can I use PTFE tape on the threads. or is there something
    > more suitable?
    > Thanks.
    >
    >


    PTFE tape is fine - but it should already have some on it! You will have to
    drain the radiator to fit (more) tape - but you needn't drain the whole
    system - just turn off both valves on that particular rad - and then undo
    one of the unions between the 2 halves of one of the valves to drain it
    (protecting the flooring from any 'orrible black sludge you may spill in the
    process!) It helps to loosen the bleed screw too, to let some air in at the
    top as the water runs out at the bottom.

    The radiator tail (the bit which screws into the rad) just may have an
    external square on it - in which case you could try tightening it with a
    spanner rather than draining and dismantling it. [It it doesn't have a
    square - and not many do - you will have to take it apart in order to
    tighten it with an internal allen key].

    Roger
     
    Roger Mills, Dec 3, 2003
    #10
  11. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Colin M" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I assumed because the OP wrote "radiator ... it's leaking where a
    > valve screws into it" that he meant the valve to rad coupling


    Yes thats what I meant.


    >which
    > relies on the mating surfaces rather than the pipe to valve which
    > relies on an olive. The only joint I found PTFE tape helps seal is the
    > threaded section into the rad itself.


    Thanks to all for your help.
     
    Steve, Dec 3, 2003
    #11
  12. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Roger Mills" <news@spam_me_not37.fslife.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:bqlddd$rvv$...
    > PTFE tape is fine - but it should already have some on it! You will have

    to
    > drain the radiator to fit (more) tape - but you needn't drain the whole
    > system - just turn off both valves on that particular rad - and then undo
    > one of the unions between the 2 halves of one of the valves to drain it
    > (protecting the flooring from any 'orrible black sludge you may spill in

    the
    > process!) It helps to loosen the bleed screw too, to let some air in at

    the
    > top as the water runs out at the bottom.


    Cheers Roger. I think I needed a bit of advice about taking it all apart.
    Its a brand new radiator, fitted by the buiilder who did our building mods
    and fitted the new kitchen. Having got his money, we haven't seen him since,
    and the radiator is just one of several unfinished or bodged jobs we have
    found.
     
    Steve, Dec 3, 2003
    #12
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