Replace Electronic Air Cleaner with Pleated Filter?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by himilecyclist@yahoo.com, Jun 25, 2005.

  1. Guest

    My 30-year-old Honeywell electronic air cleaner stopped working. The
    repair man highly suggested that I remove the cells and replace them
    with pleated air filters (4"). I did this, but am wondering if it was
    a good move or not. The repairman insisted that the pleated media
    filter would do a much better job than the electronic unit did,
    especially good for keeping dust out of the central A/C.

    Should I feel good about the change? Will the new filter catch the
    ultra-fine particulate matter that an electronic cleaner claims to?

    Thanks!
    , Jun 25, 2005
    #1
  2. Tony Hwang Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >>My 30-year-old Honeywell electronic air cleaner stopped working. The
    >>repair man highly suggested that I remove the cells and replace them
    >>with pleated air filters (4"). I did this, but am wondering if it was
    >>a good move or not. The repairman insisted that the pleated media
    >>filter would do a much better job than the electronic unit did,
    >>especially good for keeping dust out of the central A/C.

    >
    >
    > Define better. Assuming the pleated filter does not produce too much
    > air resistance and reduce the air flow too much, it should do a very good
    > job of normal air cleaning, maybe better than your old one in some ways.
    >
    >
    >>Should I feel good about the change? Will the new filter catch the
    >>ultra-fine particulate matter that an electronic cleaner claims to?

    >
    >
    > Depends. However I have to ask. Does it matter to you? Really. There
    > are many products on the market that arguably better than others but often
    > cost more or are less reliable or have some other disadvantage. You need to
    > weigh the advantages against the disadvantages. Do you really have a
    > problem caused by those ultra fine particles? It brings to mind the
    > commercials about the "lurking" germs in the bathroom air. According to all
    > the independent information I have found, yes there are germs in the air in
    > the bath, but no more than in the kitchen. They are not a problem, except
    > in the extreme case.
    >
    >
    >>Thanks!

    >
    >

    Hi,
    One thing air, flow rate will be less with filter.
    Tony
    Tony Hwang, Jun 25, 2005
    #2
  3. toller Guest

    I replace mine with pleated filters 6 years ago because I got sick of
    cleaning the electronic ones.

    They do a good job. Can't tell if if they are as good because the stuff
    they pass is too small to see.
    toller, Jun 25, 2005
    #3
  4. SQLit Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My 30-year-old Honeywell electronic air cleaner stopped working. The
    > repair man highly suggested that I remove the cells and replace them
    > with pleated air filters (4"). I did this, but am wondering if it was
    > a good move or not. The repairman insisted that the pleated media
    > filter would do a much better job than the electronic unit did,
    > especially good for keeping dust out of the central A/C.
    >
    > Should I feel good about the change? Will the new filter catch the
    > ultra-fine particulate matter that an electronic cleaner claims to?
    >
    > Thanks!


    Try WW Grainger for pleated filter information. They put a good amount of
    information about the filters they sell. I use their extended service for
    the lower static pressure. Best check with your manufactures of the filter
    and the a/c see what levels of static your system can handle. My a/c pretty
    much craps out when 0.70 of static pressure is reached. Some filter
    companies tell you to change the filter at 1.0.

    Depending on the media pleated filters are far superior to electronics. Have
    you ever seen a clean room with a electronic filter? They use Hepa pleated
    filters.
    SQLit, Jun 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Terry Guest

    "Greg O" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do HVAC service for a living. I have yet to see someone service an
    > electronic air filter often as they needed to. Once the electronic
    > elements get dirty the filter does nothing. When in use, cooling or
    > heating season, electronic filters need cleaning at least once a month to
    > do the job. A pleated filter in place of the electronic elements is a very
    > good idea.
    > When I notice that a customer has an electronic filter I ask them how
    > often they clean it. Most are surprised that once or twice a year is not
    > enough!
    > Greg

    I agree; coincidentally, the other day, I picked, up for scrap, a used
    electronic filter unit.
    It appeared to have 'never' been cleaned!
    The slide out electronic filtering units were literally jammed with
    felt-like lint, comprised of human hair, even a few feathers and some scraps
    of tissue paper! Maybe the building it came out of had included a hair
    dressing salon?
    Anyway the air flow through it must have been virtually nil. With the
    electronic filtering action completely negated by the mass of debris.
    Curious about how these things work, I removed the mess from one part of the
    unit to view the electrostatics and had to use a knife to cut through the
    mats of lint, section by section.
    By the way it has as a 120 volt 60 hertz AC input 'transformer'. The output
    of that, is connected to the electrostatic section, at presumably, a high
    voltage. But is that electrostatic section operating at AC or DC? In other
    words does the unit 'labelled transformer' also incorporate a rectifier to
    convert AC to DC?
    Info welcomed.
    Terry, Jun 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Stretch Guest

    Terry,

    The cells use DC high voltage at 7,000 to 10,000 volts to capture dust
    and other fine particles. The higher the voltage and the closer the
    plates are, the better the filtration gets. The trouble is when the
    voltage gets too high for the plate spacing, the voltage arcs from the
    ionizing wires to the plates and you get snap, crackle and pop in your
    filter, which can be quite annoying.

    Stretch
    Stretch, Jun 25, 2005
    #6
  7. m Ransley Guest

    Electronic loose efficiency as they get dirty and at my electric rates
    125kwh can cost 12$ a month to run 24x7. They need to be kept clean.
    Media gain efficency as they get dirty but are more air restrictive
    clean and more so dirty. A pooly designed system may freeze the coil
    with the media reducing airflow if you dont have a pro check present
    coil temp and calculate air flow reduction. My system is oversized so I
    welcome reduced summer airflow as it removes more humidity. I like
    Media, April Air 2200 Medias case does not seal positively, look into
    Air Bear. Or for a fancier super cleaner April Air or Lennox has a new
    unit out that is electronic and media. Just my non professional opinion,
    experiance.
    m Ransley, Jun 25, 2005
    #7
  8. jim evans Guest

    On Fri, 24 Jun 2005 21:41:52 -0500, "Greg O" <>
    wrote:

    >I do HVAC service for a living. I have yet to see someone service an
    >electronic air filter often as they needed to. Once the electronic elements
    >get dirty the filter does nothing. When in use, cooling or heating season,
    >electronic filters need cleaning at least once a month to do the job.


    I had an electronic air cleaner in a house several years ago. It had
    an alarm and a meter that told you when it needed to be cleaned. Do
    most units not have these or are they not effective?

    jim
    jim evans, Jun 25, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    Are all these downsides to electronic filters also
    applicable to portable electronic room filters such as
    Friedrich C90a in link below?

    http://tinyurl.com/5qr9q

    IOW.... is it best to not even use such portable
    electronic air cleaners?
    , Jun 25, 2005
    #9
  10. m Ransley Guest

    If you want to learn about filters May Consmer Reports and older issues
    online are worth the price of admission. Ozone is a serious issue of
    room units in closed rooms, even open in reality in my opinion. Consumer
    Reports covered the bases in several articles. The Ionic Breeze is the
    biggest scam and crap out there.
    m Ransley, Jun 25, 2005
    #10
  11. PaPaPeng Guest

    On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 19:41:14 GMT, "Gideon" <> wrote:

    >I tried inserting a 4" pleated filter in place of the electronic cells,
    >but this restricted air flow too much. They are also relatively
    >expensive, especially if you are replacing them often.
    >
    >My unit has two slide out mess filters and I have removed each of them
    >and replaced them with disposable filters. The first filter is one of those
    >extremely inexpensive filters which has a very loose weave fiberglass
    >material.



    The reports on electronic air filters isn't encouraging, not worth the
    price and maintenance hassle. The expensive pleated filters have
    several disadvantages - restricted airflow, the expense and not much
    more efficiency in removing dust than the el cheapo. Once the dust
    layer forms on the coating it becomnes just an ordinary filter.

    My current solution is to spray the el cheapo with a light coat of
    cooking oil. Its been two months now but with the warm weather the
    furnace had been on less than half a dozen times (night temps. did
    drop to single digits a few times.) The filter element is still clean
    and the oil coat sticky. No rancidity. I'll know how well this
    works when the cold season comes around.
    PaPaPeng, Jun 26, 2005
    #11
  12. BH1

    Joined:
    May 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Paper filter won't slide in

    We have an electronic filter and our repairman suggested paper filters for us, too. I bought the size he suggested, which fits but won't slide in because there is a 1/2 inch hard plastic tube sticking up from the bottom of the space. Has anyone run into this? It doesn't come out easily.
    BH1, May 18, 2011
    #12

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