Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running along basement floor

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by Mikepier, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. Mikepier

    Mikepier Guest

    Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    pipe along the floor close to the wall apparantly corroded to a point
    that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    union, so it will probably have to get cut out.

    My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.
     
    Mikepier, Feb 8, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Mikepier

    Mikepier Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 8:42 am, "Stormin Mormon"
    <cayoung61***> wrote:
    > I'm not sure if white PVC would take the temperatures, but it's a thought..
    > Cut the old steel several inches from each elbow, and put the PVC in with
    > Fermco connectors.
    >
    > The ideal answer is to cut the steel in the center. Wrench it out with
    > monster size pipe wrenches, and a couple of gorillas to supply torque.
    > Replace with two shorter pipes and a union. However, the world is seldom
    > ideal.
    >
    > Christopher A. Young
    > Learn more about Jesus
    >  www.lds.org
    > .
    >
    > "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    You know, PVC did cross my mind. If that's the case, then I would just
    need to sawzall out a section of the bad pipe, and replace with a PVC
    pipe with 2 Fernco or no-hub couplings at each end.
    But I think the temp is too high for PVC.
    I wonder if I can just cut out the bad section and replace with a
    steel pipe with 2 clamps on each end.
     
    Mikepier, Feb 8, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mikepier

    harry Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 11:29 am, Mikepier <> wrote:
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    You can buy a plastic lined clamp device for semi permanent repairs
    to this sort of thing.
    Similar to this.
    http://www.cascadeclamps.co.uk/pipe-repair-clamps.htm

    Do NOT try to dismantle/unscrew, the whole thing will be pretty
    corroded, it will likely break elsewhere.
     
    harry, Feb 8, 2012
    #3
  4. Mikepier

    harry Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 11:29 am, Mikepier <> wrote:
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    You can buy a plastic lined clamp device for semi permanent repairs
    to this sort of thing.
    Similar to this.
    http://www.cascadeclamps.co.uk/pipe-repair-clamps.htm

    Do NOT try to dismantle/unscrew, the whole thing will be pretty
    corroded, it will likely break elsewhere.
     
    harry, Feb 8, 2012
    #4
  5. Mikepier

    harry Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 11:29 am, Mikepier <> wrote:
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    There are ABS and HDPE pipe sytems for low pressure steam.
    PVC is unsuitable.
     
    harry, Feb 8, 2012
    #5
  6. Mikepier

    Home Guy Guest

    "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    Just put a can of Bar's Stop Leak in. It works wonders.
     
    Home Guy, Feb 8, 2012
    #6
  7. Mikepier

    Guest

    On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 08:42:53 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
    <cayoung61***> wrote:

    >I'm not sure if white PVC would take the temperatures, but it's a thought.
    >Cut the old steel several inches from each elbow, and put the PVC in with
    >Fermco connectors.
    >
    >The ideal answer is to cut the steel in the center. Wrench it out with
    >monster size pipe wrenches, and a couple of gorillas to supply torque.
    >Replace with two shorter pipes and a union. However, the world is seldom
    >ideal.
    >
    >Christopher A. Young
    >Learn more about Jesus
    > www.lds.org
    >.


    The big problem I see, is if that pipe is corroded enough to leak,
    puting the gorilla on the wrench to remove the pipe from the Elbow is
    quite likely to disturb more weak pipe, requiring replacement father
    up - where again the required gorilla on the pipe wrench would do the
    same to the next pipe. In my experience getting involved with
    repairing old galvanized (or black) iron pipe seldom has a happy
    ending.
    >
    >"Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    >noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    >pipe along the floor close to the wall apparantly corroded to a point
    >that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    >I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    >is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    >union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    >My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    >the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    >2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.
    >
     
    , Feb 8, 2012
    #7
  8. Mikepier

    Guest

    On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 06:11:14 -0800 (PST), Mikepier
    <> wrote:

    >On Feb 8, 8:42 am, "Stormin Mormon"
    ><cayoung61***> wrote:
    >> I'm not sure if white PVC would take the temperatures, but it's a thought.
    >> Cut the old steel several inches from each elbow, and put the PVC in with
    >> Fermco connectors.
    >>
    >> The ideal answer is to cut the steel in the center. Wrench it out with
    >> monster size pipe wrenches, and a couple of gorillas to supply torque.
    >> Replace with two shorter pipes and a union. However, the world is seldom
    >> ideal.
    >>
    >> Christopher A. Young
    >> Learn more about Jesus
    >>  www.lds.org
    >> .
    >>
    >> "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >> Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    >> noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    >> pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    >> that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    >> I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    >> is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    >> union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >>
    >> My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    >> the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    >> 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.

    >
    >You know, PVC did cross my mind. If that's the case, then I would just
    >need to sawzall out a section of the bad pipe, and replace with a PVC
    >pipe with 2 Fernco or no-hub couplings at each end.
    >But I think the temp is too high for PVC.
    >I wonder if I can just cut out the bad section and replace with a
    >steel pipe with 2 clamps on each end.

    What pressure is this system running at? Ferncos have a rather
    finite pressure/temperature limit - but if within range would
    definitely be less likely to turn into a real CF , with each part
    needing replacement causing 2 more.
     
    , Feb 8, 2012
    #8
  9. Mikepier

    Guest

    On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 13:18:42 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
    <cayoung61***> wrote:

    > http://www.harvel.com/pipepvc-sch40-80-derating.asp
    >Says max 140F. So, the couplers and some galvanized seems to be the way to
    >go.
    >I didn't know that about PVC Temps, until I had a bit of a web search.
    >
    >I didn't look long enough to check temps of Fernco.
    > http://www.fernco.com/plumbing/flexible-couplings
    >
    >Christopher A. Young
    >Learn more about Jesus
    > www.lds.org
    >.
    >
    >"Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >But I think the temp is too high for PVC.
    >I wonder if I can just cut out the bad section and replace with a
    >steel pipe with 2 clamps on each end.
    >

    Ferncos are PVC, so they are a non-starter for this application. They
    will just balloon/deform and pop.
     
    , Feb 8, 2012
    #9
  10. Mikepier

    Evan Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 1:00 pm, harry <> wrote:
    > On Feb 8, 11:29 am, Mikepier <> wrote:
    >
    > > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.

    >
    > > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.

    >
    > You can buy a plastic lined clamp device  for semi permanent repairs
    > to this sort of thing.
    > Similar to this.http://www.cascadeclamps.co.uk/pipe-repair-clamps.htm
    >
    > Do NOT try to dismantle/unscrew, the whole thing will be pretty
    > corroded, it will likely break elsewhere.


    +1 to the clamp on leak stop device...

    A Fernco by itself is enough to seal against sewer gasses at
    close to no discernible pressure difference from the base
    atmospheric pressure... A steam boiler operates above that
    pressure inside the system... You would just end up popping
    it... The specialized leak stopping clamps have metal which
    can withstand the pressure and hold in the water or steam
    which is beyond the pressure capacity of a Fernco...

    ~~ Evan
     
    Evan, Feb 8, 2012
    #10
  11. Mikepier

    Ron Guest

    Mikepier wrote:
    > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > pipe along the floor close to the wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    I think this is a good place to post your question, but since it is about a
    steam heat system, another good place is at:
    http://www.heatinghelp.com/forum-category/93/Strictly-Steam .

    That is a steam heat forum on the http://www.heatinghelp.com website.

    If someone does come in a fix it, let us know what they say and what they
    do. I have steam heat in one property that I own, so I had to do a "crash
    course" in learning about steam heat when I bought the place. One thing I
    did was go to the http://www.heatinghelp.com and buy their book called, "We
    Got Steam Heat!", and I found it to be very helpful.
     
    Ron, Feb 8, 2012
    #11
  12. Mikepier

    Larry W Guest

    In article <>,
    Mikepier <> wrote:
    >Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    >noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    >pipe along the floor close to the wall apparantly corroded to a point
    >that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    >I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    >is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    >union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >
    >My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    >the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    >2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.


    When I had a new steam boiler installed (3300 sq ft, 3 story house) several
    years ago, the plumbers replaced the low return lines with copper. These
    are the low lines at floor level (floor that the boiler sits on!) that
    normally always have water in them rather than steam. I believe they
    used 1 inch copper, possibly 1.25" I can't measure it right now as I no
    longer live at that house. It works fine. Your building may have a bigger
    system and maby not be able to use the smaller pipe.


    --
    There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

    Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
     
    Larry W, Feb 9, 2012
    #12
  13. Mikepier

    Mikepier Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    Well I ended up fixing it tonight. Got a family member to help me.We
    replaced it with 2" copper with Di-electric nipples at each end.
    A little pricey, but was a lot simpler than replacing with black steel
    pipe.

    Thanks for everyones input.
     
    Mikepier, Feb 9, 2012
    #13
  14. Mikepier

    Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 5:38 pm, Evan <> wrote:
    > On Feb 8, 1:00 pm, harry <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Feb 8, 11:29 am, Mikepier <> wrote:

    >
    > > > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > > > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > > > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > > > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > > > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > > > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > > > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.

    >
    > > > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > > > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > > > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser..

    >
    > > You can buy a plastic lined clamp device  for semi permanent repairs
    > > to this sort of thing.
    > > Similar to this.http://www.cascadeclamps.co.uk/pipe-repair-clamps.htm

    >
    > > Do NOT try to dismantle/unscrew, the whole thing will be pretty
    > > corroded, it will likely break elsewhere.

    >
    > +1 to the clamp on leak stop device...



    -1 to any clamp on leak stop device. He has 10 ft of old
    iron pipe that is corroded through and leaking. Putting
    a bandaid on the one spot isn't a real repair. I'd do it
    in an emergency to buy some time until the right repari
    can be made, but never suggest it as a correct repair.


    >
    > A Fernco by itself is enough to seal against sewer gasses at
    > close to no discernible pressure difference from the base
    > atmospheric pressure...  A steam boiler operates above that
    > pressure inside the system...  You would just end up popping
    > it...  The specialized leak stopping clamps have metal which
    > can withstand the pressure and hold in the water or steam
    > which is beyond the pressure capacity of a Fernco...
    >
    > ~~ Evan- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
     
    , Feb 9, 2012
    #14
  15. Mikepier

    Guest

    On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 06:11:14 -0800 (PST), Mikepier
    <> wrote:

    >On Feb 8, 8:42 am, "Stormin Mormon"
    ><cayoung61***> wrote:
    >> I'm not sure if white PVC would take the temperatures, but it's a thought.
    >> Cut the old steel several inches from each elbow, and put the PVC in with
    >> Fermco connectors.
    >>
    >> The ideal answer is to cut the steel in the center. Wrench it out with
    >> monster size pipe wrenches, and a couple of gorillas to supply torque.
    >> Replace with two shorter pipes and a union. However, the world is seldom
    >> ideal.
    >>
    >> Christopher A. Young
    >> Learn more about Jesus
    >>  www.lds.org
    >> .
    >>
    >> "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >> Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    >> noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    >> pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    >> that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    >> I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    >> is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    >> union, so it will probably have to get cut out.
    >>
    >> My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    >> the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    >> 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.

    >
    >You know, PVC did cross my mind. If that's the case, then I would just
    >need to sawzall out a section of the bad pipe, and replace with a PVC
    >pipe with 2 Fernco or no-hub couplings at each end.
    >But I think the temp is too high for PVC.
    >I wonder if I can just cut out the bad section and replace with a
    >steel pipe with 2 clamps on each end.


    I wouldn't use PVC for a steam pipe.
    Why do you need to call someone.
    Just cut it somewhere with a sawsall. Unscrew the two pieces. Buy two
    pieces of pipe plus a union to make the exact same length (the unions
    add a few inches). Just take the old pieces to a hardware of plumbing
    store and fit pieces together with the union to match the length. A 9
    foot piece and a 9 inch piece would probably be about right. (or any
    combination). Put the union in the easiest place to turn it.

    Of course you have to drain the boiler or shut off valves, etc.

    Using copper to steel will cause a dielectric issue, causing both metals
    to corrode and decay faster. That steel pipe was probably there a long
    time, stick with the same material. Since it's on the floor, spray
    paint it, or brush on some rustoleum red primer to protect it if you
    want.

    If the pipes dont want to come out of the elbows, smack the elbows with
    a 5 lb sledge a few times. (not hard enough to crack them if they are
    cast iron type).
     
    , Feb 9, 2012
    #15
  16. Mikepier

    RicodJour Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 8, 5:46 pm, "Ron" <> wrote:
    > Mikepier wrote:
    > > Last night I peaked in the basement of a building I manage, and
    > > noticed rusty water on the floor. It turns out that a 2" steel return
    > > pipe along the floor close to the  wall apparantly corroded to a point
    > > that its leaking. And now my boiler is cycling on and off to refill.
    > > I will probably call someone in to fix it since it looks involved. It
    > > is a 10 foot length of pipe with elbows at each end. There is no
    > > union, so it will probably have to get cut out.

    >
    > > My question is besides steel, what is another alternative to replacing
    > > the pipe? I'm pretty sure copper, but that would be expensive for a
    > > 2"-10 foot length. Again this is the return line, not the steam riser.

    >
    > I think this is a good place to post your question, but since it is abouta
    > steam heat system, another good place is at:
    >  http://www.heatinghelp.com/forum-category/93/Strictly-Steam.
    >
    > That is a steam heat forum on the  http://www.heatinghelp.com website..
    >
    > If someone does come in a fix it, let us know what they say and what they
    > do.  I have steam heat in one property that I own, so I had to do a "crash
    > course" in learning about steam heat when I bought the place.  One thing I
    > did was go to the  http://www.heatinghelp.comand buy their book called,"We
    > Got Steam Heat!", and I found it to be very helpful.


    Yep, Dan Holohan's site is the best forum on the intertubes for steam
    heat questions and information. I drove through Bethpage, NY two weeks
    ago and was shocked to see a storefront with "Heatinghelp.com" on the
    window sign. I never really thought about the place having an actual
    physical presence. Bought a T-shirt. :)

    To the OP: the section you cut out wasn't corroded, was it? It was a
    connection that gave up the ghost, right? That's what I've found
    every time I worked on a return line. Some corroded from the outside
    in.

    Working on black iron (don't use galvanized) condensate returns isn't
    bad as long as you can get to the joints and you have big enough
    wrenches and use a cheater pipe over the handle to increase the
    leverage.

    R
     
    RicodJour, Feb 9, 2012
    #16
  17. Mikepier

    Mikepier Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    > To the OP:  the section you cut out wasn't corroded, was it?  It was a
    > connection that gave up the ghost, right?  That's what I've found
    > every time I worked on a return line. Some corroded from the outside
    > in.


    It corroded in the middle of the pipe at the bottom. The pipe was
    halfway buried in concrete.
     
    Mikepier, Feb 9, 2012
    #17
  18. Mikepier

    RicodJour Guest

    Re: Repairing leak in 2" steam return line pipe running alongbasement floor

    On Feb 9, 2:10 pm, Mikepier <> wrote:
    > > To the OP:  the section you cut out wasn't corroded, was it?  It was a
    > > connection that gave up the ghost, right?  That's what I've found
    > > every time I worked on a return line. Some corroded from the outside
    > > in.

    >
    > It corroded in the middle of the pipe at the bottom. The pipe was
    > halfway buried in concrete.


    Okay. I probably missed the part where you said it was buried. When
    the return lines run along the floor
    they usually corrode at the threaded fittings unless there's something
    else going on. In my experience they rust through from the outside in
    when they're partially buried. I had one that rusted through from
    being buried in
    the sand from an old concrete foundation leaking and leaching over the
    years.

    If you ever have call to do it again go with black iron. You won't
    need any dielectric fittings and you can use a union or a left/right
    threaded coupling and nipple in lieu of the union.

    R
     
    RicodJour, Feb 10, 2012
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. kmillar

    Along and down OR down and along?

    kmillar, Feb 9, 2005, in forum: UK DIY
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    212
    kmillar
    Feb 9, 2005
  2. ironer
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    265
    Andy Wade
    Nov 14, 2006
  3. Slow leak on boiler return line

    , Nov 6, 2007, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    163
    ransley
    Nov 7, 2007
  4. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    174
    ransley
    Nov 7, 2007
  5. gmdkrumm

    4" PVC pipe in basement has leak on outside of pipe

    gmdkrumm, Dec 29, 2010, in forum: Plumbing and Drains
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    665
    gmdkrumm
    Dec 29, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page