Repairing Holes in Roofing Felt (tiled roof)

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Stephen Jones, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. I have recently had a new tv aerial fitted and the guy climbed up the
    roof by slipping out some roof tiles. However I have now looked in the
    roof attic to find that the roofing felt has been puntured where he
    climbed, presumably by the tips of his feet. Is there anyway of
    repairing this from inside the roof ?
    Thanks


    Steve Jones
     
    Stephen Jones, Feb 2, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Stephen Jones

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <>,
    Stephen Jones <> wrote:
    > I have recently had a new tv aerial fitted and the guy climbed up the
    > roof by slipping out some roof tiles. However I have now looked in the
    > roof attic to find that the roofing felt has been puntured where he
    > climbed, presumably by the tips of his feet. Is there anyway of
    > repairing this from inside the roof ?


    I'd take the aerial 'fitter' to a small claims court and get the whole
    roof repaired properly.

    It used to be said the only two qualifications most aerial riggers had
    were the ability to drive a van and climb a ladder. Perhaps they've left
    out the roof ladder now.

    --
    *If love is blind, why is lingerie so popular?

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 2, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 02/02/2004 Stephen Jones a wrote :
    > have recently had a new tv aerial fitted and the guy climbed up the
    > roof by slipping out some roof tiles. However I have now looked in the
    > roof attic to find that the roofing felt has been puntured where he
    > climbed, presumably by the tips of his feet. Is there anyway of
    > repairing this from inside the roof ?


    It all sounds a bit unlikely that an arial fitter would be able to do
    this simply by climbing on the roof. He would need to make a determined
    effort to lift the tiles, in order to puncture the felt.However if you
    are certain he has, then get him to pay for the repairs.

    There is no effective way to make a proper job, without taking the
    tiles off first, but you may be able to stick it with the likes of duct
    tape or similar.

    --

    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.org
     
    Harry Bloomfield, Feb 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Stephen Jones

    Capitol Guest

    Get another piece of felt, and stick it in position( from inside) over the
    splits with bituminous lap cement. You'll have to support it for a couple of
    days whilst the solvents dry out, but it will then work for the next 10
    years at least.
    Regards
    Capitol
     
    Capitol, Feb 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Harry Bloomfield retched Repairing Holes in Roofing Felt (tiled roof)
    onto my recliner:

    >On 02/02/2004 Stephen Jones a wrote :
    >> have recently had a new tv aerial fitted and the guy climbed up the
    >> roof by slipping out some roof tiles. However I have now looked in the
    >> roof attic to find that the roofing felt has been puntured where he
    >> climbed, presumably by the tips of his feet. Is there anyway of
    >> repairing this from inside the roof ?

    >
    >It all sounds a bit unlikely that an arial fitter would be able to do
    >this simply by climbing on the roof. He would need to make a determined
    >effort to lift the tiles, in order to puncture the felt.However if you
    >are certain he has, then get him to pay for the repairs.
    >
    >There is no effective way to make a proper job, without taking the
    >tiles off first, but you may be able to stick it with the likes of duct
    >tape or similar.
    >


    Duct tape indeed, COWBOY!


    --

    Phil K.

    http://philkyle2003.reachme.at/
     
    ng_abuse-subscribe, Feb 2, 2004
    #5
  6. Stephen Jones wrote:

    > I have recently had a new tv aerial fitted and the guy climbed up the
    > roof by slipping out some roof tiles. However I have now looked in the
    > roof attic to find that the roofing felt has been puntured where he
    > climbed, presumably by the tips of his feet. Is there anyway of
    > repairing this from inside the roof ?
    > Thanks
    >



    Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    slates/tiles off...


    >
    > Steve Jones
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Feb 2, 2004
    #6
  7. Stephen Jones

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <>,
    The Natural Philosopher <> wrote:
    > Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    > slates/tiles off...


    Whilst that may be one factor, it also stops any driven rain reaching the
    rafters. And given it's a relatively new idea, how did they stop tiles
    blowing off in the old days?

    --
    *Verbs HAS to agree with their subjects *

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 2, 2004
    #7
  8. Dave Plowman wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > The Natural Philosopher <> wrote:
    >
    >>Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    >>slates/tiles off...
    >>

    >
    > Whilst that may be one factor, it also stops any driven rain reaching the
    > rafters. And given it's a relatively new idea, how did they stop tiles
    > blowing off in the old days?
    >
    >



    They used more nails. And they blew off :)
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Feb 2, 2004
    #8
  9. Stephen Jones

    Mark Guest

    Dave Plowman typed:

    > In article <>,
    > The Natural Philosopher <> wrote:
    >> Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    >> slates/tiles off...

    >
    >And given it's a relatively new idea, how did they stop
    > tiles blowing off in the old days?


    Nails...... lots of them :p
     
    Mark, Feb 2, 2004
    #9
  10. On 02/02/2004 The Natural Philosopher a wrote :
    > Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing slates/tiles
    > off...


    That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs
    could be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was a
    layer of felt underneath.

    --

    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.org
     
    Harry Bloomfield, Feb 3, 2004
    #10
  11. Stephen Jones

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <bXATb.15982$>,
    Mark <Notarealaddress@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > >> Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    > >> slates/tiles off...

    > >
    > >And given it's a relatively new idea, how did they stop
    > > tiles blowing off in the old days?


    > Nails...... lots of them :p


    Well the artificial slates on my roof have a fixing at the front end also
    - as well as being as tight fitting as any real slate. And underfelt too.

    The old tiled roof seemed only to have the tiles fixed down every so often
    - and no felt. And it leaked like a sieve with the wind in the wrong
    direction. ;-)

    --
    *I see you've set aside this special time to humiliate yourself in public

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 3, 2004
    #11
  12. Harry Bloomfield wrote:

    > On 02/02/2004 The Natural Philosopher a wrote :
    >
    >> Don't boher. it is only there to stop pressure build up blowing
    >> slates/tiles off...

    >
    >
    > That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs
    > could be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was a
    > layer of felt underneath.
    >


    I don't think so.

    My roof with reasonable Tyvek overlap., leaked i heavy rain before
    tiloing through the odd hole.

    After tiling, even in huge winds, there is no leak. Thats whey you have
    a three tile overlap - to stop the wind and driving rain.


    The felt helps, not because it is waterproof, but because it is
    windproof - it slows the draughts down so they can't carry the water up
    the tiles. This also helps stop the negative pressure effects - where
    vaccum in a strong gust sucks the tiles off.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Feb 3, 2004
    #12
  13. The Natural Philosopher wrote on Tuesday (03/02/2004) :
    >> That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs could
    >> be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was a layer of
    >> felt underneath.
    >>

    >
    > I don't think so.
    >
    > My roof with reasonable Tyvek overlap., leaked i heavy rain before tiloing
    > through the odd hole.
    >
    > After tiling, even in huge winds, there is no leak. Thats whey you have a
    > three tile overlap - to stop the wind and driving rain.


    Our roof has a three tile overlap at any place you care to look, but we
    have no underfelt. We can see the under sides of the tiles from the
    loft. I was rather puzzled by the fact that the exposed inside tile
    hedges had been flaunched with a very crumbly mix of sand and cement,
    much of which has fallen away over the years.

    We are located in a very exposed hill top location and despite the lack
    of any under felt, I have never known water to be driven in by the
    wind, though it is very draughty up there. Each tile (at a guess) is
    flat and about 12- 14" long.

    --

    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.org
     
    Harry Bloomfield, Feb 3, 2004
    #13
  14. Stephen Jones

    Huge Guest

    Harry Bloomfield <> writes:
    >The Natural Philosopher wrote on Tuesday (03/02/2004) :
    >>> That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs could
    >>> be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was a layer of
    >>> felt underneath.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I don't think so.
    >>
    >> My roof with reasonable Tyvek overlap., leaked i heavy rain before tiloing
    >> through the odd hole.
    >>
    >> After tiling, even in huge winds, there is no leak. Thats whey you have a
    >> three tile overlap - to stop the wind and driving rain.

    >
    >Our roof has a three tile overlap at any place you care to look, but we
    >have no underfelt. We can see the under sides of the tiles from the
    >loft.


    Our 1950s semi in Barnet was like that. We never had rain in, but we did
    get 2" of snow in there, once. :eek:(

    --
    "The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
    [email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
     
    Huge, Feb 3, 2004
    #14
  15. Harry Bloomfield retched Repairing Holes in Roofing Felt (tiled roof)
    onto my recliner:

    >The Natural Philosopher wrote on Tuesday (03/02/2004) :
    >>> That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs
    >>>could be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was
    >>>layer of felt underneath.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I don't think so.
    >>
    >> My roof with reasonable Tyvek overlap., leaked i heavy rain before
    >>tiloing through the odd hole.
    >>
    >> After tiling, even in huge winds, there is no leak. Thats whey you
    >>have a three tile overlap - to stop the wind and driving rain.

    >
    >Our roof has a three tile overlap at any place you care to look, but we
    >have no underfelt. We can see the under sides of the tiles from the
    >loft. I was rather puzzled by the fact that the exposed inside tile
    >hedges had been flaunched with a very crumbly mix of sand and cement,
    >much of which has fallen away over the years.
    >
    >We are located in a very exposed hill top location and despite the lack
    >of any under felt, I have never known water to be driven in by the
    >wind, though it is very draughty up there. Each tile (at a guess) is
    >flat and about 12- 14" long.
    >


    **** OFF NETKKKOP!


    --

    Phil K.

    http://philkyle2003.reachme.at/
     
    I am everyone on usenet!, Feb 3, 2004
    #15
  16. Stephen Jones

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <bvp4cp$kdp$>,
    Huge <> wrote:
    > Our 1950s semi in Barnet was like that. We never had rain in, but we did
    > get 2" of snow in there, once. :eek:(


    Older houses in the NE of Scotland (where I'm from) have T&G under the
    slates to stop this happening.

    --
    *Dancing is a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire *

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 4, 2004
    #16
  17. Reverend Parson Peter Parsnip retched Repairing Holes in Roofing Felt
    (tiled roof) onto my recliner:

    >The Lord alerted my mind to the presence of this EVIL article by I am
    >everyone on usenet!, and I thusly replied:
    >
    >> Harry Bloomfield retched Repairing Holes in Roofing Felt (tiled roof)
    >> onto my recliner:
    >>
    >>>The Natural Philosopher wrote on Tuesday (03/02/2004) :
    >>>>> That may be one reason, but I think another reason was so that roofs
    >>>>>could be made lighter/cheaper, with less overlap needed if there was
    >>>>>layer of felt underneath.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think so.
    >>>>
    >>>> My roof with reasonable Tyvek overlap., leaked i heavy rain before
    >>>>tiloing through the odd hole.
    >>>>
    >>>> After tiling, even in huge winds, there is no leak. Thats whey you
    >>>>have a three tile overlap - to stop the wind and driving rain.
    >>>
    >>>Our roof has a three tile overlap at any place you care to look, but we
    >>>have no underfelt. We can see the under sides of the tiles from the
    >>>loft. I was rather puzzled by the fact that the exposed inside tile
    >>>hedges had been flaunched with a very crumbly mix of sand and cement,
    >>>much of which has fallen away over the years.
    >>>
    >>>We are located in a very exposed hill top location and despite the lack
    >>>of any under felt, I have never known water to be driven in by the
    >>>wind, though it is very draughty up there. Each tile (at a guess) is
    >>>flat and about 12- 14" long.

    >>
    >> **** OFF NETKKKOP!

    >
    >A Fine Post.
    >

    Thanks, I just carved it.


    --

    Phil K.

    http://philkyle2003.reachme.at/
     
    I am everyone on usenet!, Feb 4, 2004
    #17
  18. Stephen Jones

    John Laird Guest

    On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 01:21:20 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman
    <> wrote:

    >In article <bvp4cp$kdp$>,
    > Huge <> wrote:
    >> Our 1950s semi in Barnet was like that. We never had rain in, but we did
    >> get 2" of snow in there, once. :eek:(

    >
    >Older houses in the NE of Scotland (where I'm from) have T&G under the
    >slates to stop this happening.


    I can vouch for at least one modern house in SW Scotland in this regard. I
    believe it is generally termed "sarking".

    --
    Pardon our dust... nonsense under construction.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
    John Laird, Feb 4, 2004
    #18
  19. Stephen Jones

    S Viemeister Guest

    John Laird wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 01:21:20 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <bvp4cp$kdp$>,
    > > Huge <> wrote:
    > >> Our 1950s semi in Barnet was like that. We never had rain in, but we did
    > >> get 2" of snow in there, once. :eek:(

    > >
    > >Older houses in the NE of Scotland (where I'm from) have T&G under the
    > >slates to stop this happening.

    >
    > I can vouch for at least one modern house in SW Scotland in this regard. I
    > believe it is generally termed "sarking".
    >

    My house was built about 18 years ago - northwest Scotland - and it has
    'sarking'.
     
    S Viemeister, Feb 4, 2004
    #19
  20. Stephen Jones

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <40220c86$0$10334$>,
    Christian McArdle <> wrote:
    > I was under the impression that it was called sarking whatever it was
    > made from. i.e. wood sarking or felt sarking.


    And it's a luvverly word...

    --
    *A conscience is what hurts when all your other parts feel so good *

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 5, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. JohnJ
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    835
  2. N. Thornton
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    617
    N. Thornton
    Jan 8, 2005
  3. Marshal Anderson
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,072
    Owain
    Dec 8, 2006
  4. john

    15 lb felt vs. 30 lb felt

    john, Oct 27, 2003, in forum: Building Construction
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,088
    Misterbeets
    Nov 2, 2003
  5. Moonraker

    Repairing tiled concrete step

    Moonraker, Apr 15, 2011, in forum: UK DIY
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    127
    The Medway Handyman
    Apr 15, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page