Repairing cracked shelf in refrigerator door

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by jgold@desktoppub.com, Oct 19, 2005.

  1. Guest

    The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    repair it?

    I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    think there was enough surface area.

    My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    would be ugly and hard to clean.

    I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    trick?

    Thanks,

    John
     
    , Oct 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Doug Kanter Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    > repair it?
    >
    > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    > think there was enough surface area.
    >
    > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    >
    > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    > trick?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > John
    >


    If you find a way, let me know. I've tried two different epoxies so far on
    the vegetable drawer. No luck.
     
    Doug Kanter, Oct 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. EXT Guest

    I have repaired plastic fridge shelves/drawers with pop rivets to hold
    stainless steel strapping across the break. This creates a "decorative" type
    of repair as it looks like it should be there. The stainless steel straps
    are about 1/2" wide and are leftovers from the straps used to anchor
    road-side signs to utility poles by strapping around the pole. The excess is
    cut off and that is what I used.

    "Doug Kanter" <> wrote in message
    news:wbs5f.2188$...
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    > > repair it?
    > >
    > > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    > > think there was enough surface area.
    > >
    > > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    > > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    > >
    > > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    > > trick?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > John
    > >

    >
    > If you find a way, let me know. I've tried two different epoxies so far on
    > the vegetable drawer. No luck.
    >
    >
     
    EXT, Oct 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Doug Kanter Guest

    Good idea, but then I'd want stainless steel EVERYTHING in the kitchen, and
    I can't afford that. :)

    "EXT" <etonks@sunstormADD-DOT-COM> wrote in message
    news:43565684$0$48904$...
    >I have repaired plastic fridge shelves/drawers with pop rivets to hold
    > stainless steel strapping across the break. This creates a "decorative"
    > type
    > of repair as it looks like it should be there. The stainless steel straps
    > are about 1/2" wide and are leftovers from the straps used to anchor
    > road-side signs to utility poles by strapping around the pole. The excess
    > is
    > cut off and that is what I used.
    >
    > "Doug Kanter" <> wrote in message
    > news:wbs5f.2188$...
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    >> > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    >> > repair it?
    >> >
    >> > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    >> > think there was enough surface area.
    >> >
    >> > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    >> > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    >> >
    >> > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    >> > trick?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> >
    >> > John
    >> >

    >>
    >> If you find a way, let me know. I've tried two different epoxies so far
    >> on
    >> the vegetable drawer. No luck.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Doug Kanter, Oct 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    wrote:
    > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    > repair it?
    >
    > I tried epoxy, but no luck


    Epoxy doesn't work well on plastic, except for hard plastics, such as
    polyester and bakelite. Also don't bother with super glue.

    Refrigerator plastic is typically PVC or ABS, both which can be
    repaired very well through solvent welding with MEK of lacquer thinner.
    I've also used automotive carburetor or throttle body spray cleaners.
    Try to let the solvent evaporate for at least 24 hours before applying
    much mechanical stress to the repair, but since a refrigerator is so
    cold, I'd extend that to a week.

    Don't rule out removing the entire panel from the refrigerator door to
    reinforce it from the inside. It may be held in place by screws tucked
    under the gasket.
     
    , Oct 19, 2005
    #5
  6. "Bondo"...seriously.
    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    > repair it?
    >
    > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    > think there was enough surface area.
    >
    > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    >
    > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    > trick?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > John
    >
     
    Craven Morehead, Oct 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Amun Guest

    It could be done but would sure take a lot of those 1/2" straps
    <g>

    AMUN


    "Doug Kanter" <> wrote in message
    news:cMs5f.10342$...
    > Good idea, but then I'd want stainless steel EVERYTHING in the kitchen,

    and
    > I can't afford that. :)
    >
    > "EXT" <etonks@sunstormADD-DOT-COM> wrote in message
    > news:43565684$0$48904$...
    > >I have repaired plastic fridge shelves/drawers with pop rivets to hold
    > > stainless steel strapping across the break. This creates a "decorative"
    > > type
    > > of repair as it looks like it should be there. The stainless steel

    straps
    > > are about 1/2" wide and are leftovers from the straps used to anchor
    > > road-side signs to utility poles by strapping around the pole. The

    excess
    > > is
    > > cut off and that is what I used.
    > >
    > > "Doug Kanter" <> wrote in message
    > > news:wbs5f.2188$...
    > >>
    > >> <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > >> > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how to
    > >> > repair it?
    > >> >
    > >> > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I don't
    > >> > think there was enough surface area.
    > >> >
    > >> > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work, but
    > >> > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    > >> > trick?
    > >> >
    > >> > Thanks,
    > >> >
    > >> > John
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> If you find a way, let me know. I've tried two different epoxies so far
    > >> on
    > >> the vegetable drawer. No luck.
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Amun, Oct 19, 2005
    #7
  8. DanG Guest

    I had excellent success with a little dorm type box where the
    bottle holder straps had ripped out and left large holes and some
    cracking. Used grow foam, injected in the holes. The one I used
    is a commercial product for setting/insulating windows that does
    not triple expand and break things. It has been in service for a
    few years now. I made new bottle rack fronts out of some
    appropriate material because mine were missing, If I'd had factory
    ones, I believe they would have reinstalled.

    (top posted for your convenience)
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Keep the whole world singing . . . .
    DanG (remove the sevens)




    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how
    > to
    > repair it?
    >
    > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I
    > don't
    > think there was enough surface area.
    >
    > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work,
    > but
    > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    >
    > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will
    > do the
    > trick?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > John
    >
     
    DanG, Oct 20, 2005
    #8
  9. Rudy Guest


    > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will do the
    > trick?


    Look in your phone book for "Industrial Plastic & Paint"..
    They are plastic wizards. If you have one in your town, take the part in to
    them and see what they recommend.
     
    Rudy, Oct 20, 2005
    #9
  10. Guest

    Dan --

    Many thanks for the great idea -- it worked! I used duct tape to hold
    the shelf pieces together, then drilled a series of small holes in the
    bottom of the shelf and sprayed the foam in. I couldn't find the
    non-expanding type, so I sprayed very cautiously.

    Since the fridge was on, it too much longer than usual to cure, but
    once it did, the shelf was very solid -- certainly good enough to get
    another 8 years out of the beast.

    Thanks again,

    John

    DanG wrote:
    > I had excellent success with a little dorm type box where the
    > bottle holder straps had ripped out and left large holes and some
    > cracking. Used grow foam, injected in the holes. The one I used
    > is a commercial product for setting/insulating windows that does
    > not triple expand and break things. It has been in service for a
    > few years now. I made new bottle rack fronts out of some
    > appropriate material because mine were missing, If I'd had factory
    > ones, I believe they would have reinstalled.
    >
    > (top posted for your convenience)
    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Keep the whole world singing . . . .
    > DanG (remove the sevens)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > The lower shelf on the door (molded plastic) in my 8-year-old
    > > refrigerator is cracked on both ends -- any suggestions for how
    > > to
    > > repair it?
    > >
    > > I tried epoxy, but no luck -- the plastic is pretty thin and I
    > > don't
    > > think there was enough surface area.
    > >
    > > My appliance repair shop suggested duct tape, which would work,
    > > but
    > > would be ugly and hard to clean.
    > >
    > > I'm wondering if there is some kind of kit out there that will
    > > do the
    > > trick?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > John
    > >
     
    , Nov 17, 2005
    #10
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