remove lagging from cold water tank in summer ?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by jives11, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. jives11

    jives11 Guest

    Hi,

    I have 2 large plastic water tanks in my loft (= a small header for
    the CH). The tanks are black plastic and interconnected. They are also
    well lagged.

    I was thinking about solar Hot water and it occurred to me that during
    the summer it may be of benefit to remove the insulation from the
    tanks. The attic can get unbearably hot and presumably the insulation
    is working against any preheating of the water before it hits the
    boiler for HW ? I'd guess by pure infra red radiation the plastci tank
    would heat fractionally on hot days ?

    Of course with the mad UK weather there is always the risk of a cold
    spell, but I'd guess for a few months the risk would be low.

    anyone do this and get any benefit
     
    jives11, Mar 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. jives11

    Guest Guest

    On 29 Mar,
    "jives11" <> wrote:

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have 2 large plastic water tanks in my loft (= a small header for
    > the CH). The tanks are black plastic and interconnected. They are also
    > well lagged.
    >
    > I was thinking about solar Hot water and it occurred to me that during
    > the summer it may be of benefit to remove the insulation from the
    > tanks. The attic can get unbearably hot and presumably the insulation
    > is working against any preheating of the water before it hits the
    > boiler for HW ? I'd guess by pure infra red radiation the plastci tank
    > would heat fractionally on hot days ?
    >
    > Of course with the mad UK weather there is always the risk of a cold
    > spell, but I'd guess for a few months the risk would be low.
    >
    > anyone do this and get any benefit
    >

    Don't! It will stagnate at an elevated temperature, and be liable to spread
    legionella, particulary if there is a cold draw off from it. It must be kept
    at below 20degC.

    --
    B Thumbs
    Change lycos to yahoo to reply
     
    Guest, Mar 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. jives11

    jives11 Guest

    On 29 Mar, 21:04, <> wrote:
    > On 29 Mar,
    > "jives11" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Hi,

    >
    > > I have 2 large plastic water tanks in my loft (= a small header for
    > > the CH). The tanks are black plastic and interconnected. They are also
    > > well lagged.

    >
    > > I was thinking about solar Hot water and it occurred to me that during
    > > the summer it may be of benefit to remove the insulation from the
    > > tanks. The attic can get unbearably hot and presumably the insulation
    > > is working against any preheating of the water before it hits the
    > > boiler for HW ? I'd guess by pure infra red radiation the plastci tank
    > > would heat fractionally on hot days ?

    >
    > > Of course with the mad UK weather there is always the risk of a cold
    > > spell, but I'd guess for a few months the risk would be low.

    >
    > > anyone do this and get any benefit

    >
    > Don't! It will stagnate at an elevated temperature, and be liable to spread
    > legionella, particulary if there is a cold draw off from it. It must be kept
    > at below 20degC.
    >
    > --
    > B Thumbs
    > Change lycos to yahoo to reply


    Many thanks. I had not thought of that. So how do solar water heating
    systems avoid this ? I'd assumed they preheat stored water before it
    enters the boiler.

    Last year while on holiday in Crete I noticed lots of houses
    *appeared* to have black plastic water tanks on their flat roofs. I'd
    assumed this was a cheap way to get some raise of temperature.
     
    jives11, Mar 29, 2007
    #3
  4. jives11

    jives11 Guest

    On 30 Mar, 06:39, David Hansen <>
    wrote:
    > On 29 Mar 2007 13:19:38 -0700 someone who may be "jives11"
    > <> wrote this:-
    >
    > >Many thanks. I had not thought of that. So how do solar water heating
    > >systems avoid this ? I'd assumed they preheat stored water before it
    > >enters the boiler.

    >
    > Assuming you are thinking of the domestic hot water heating part of
    > a combination boiler, the solar panel will feed a relatively small
    > hot water cylinder from which water to the boiler is drawn (either
    > directly or via a heat exchanger). The combination boiler must be
    > able to accept heated water.
    >
    > --
    > David Hansen, Edinburgh
    > I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
    > http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54


    Thanks. I wasn't thinking of a combi. My system is a fully pumped
    system with hotwater tank.

    I had assumed that anything that raised the temperature of the water
    in the HW header tank would reduce the amount of gas and hence CO2
    consumed.

    So how do solar hot waters heat the water ? Is there a secondary coil
    in the hot water tank, through which the solar heated water is pumped
    OR do they raise the temperature of the water in the storage tank.
    Sounds like the latter is unlikely given the health issues with having
    quantities of warm water hanging around with only a lid protecting it.
     
    jives11, Mar 30, 2007
    #4
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