Re: replacing basement walls and raising house

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by Ray, Aug 30, 2003.

  1. Ray

    Ray Guest

    >CowPoo <(nospam)> wrote:
    This is an oldie but a goodie
    Lazenby opined about antiques and cherished older homes
    and call the Historical Societty first..
    The foundation might be worthy of being preserved.

    >I am considering purchasing a home which is in need of a new basement.
    >The home is approx. 100 years old with stone basement walls.
    >Over the years the basement walls have moved in, i'm guessing because
    >of moisture and trees planted too close to the house. Some large
    >concrete slabs were placed behind the walls at some point to stop
    >the movement, but I am unsure of how long ago these were built.
    >They are showing signs of cracks and movement. Photos are
    >available if needed, email me at .
    >
    >There's only 290 sq.ft. in the basement and the height is 5 ft..
    >The first floor of the home is about 450 sq.ft.
    >I would like to lift the house and have a new basement built
    >with 8 foot ceilings and under the entire first floor, 450 sq.ft..
    >
    >Is this possible?


    It sound to me like the house may be sitting on
    1. The ground or
    2, The floor joists and there is nothing under the perimeter walls.
    Now we don't know what the house costuction is.
    It could be brick, it could be frame.
    But Its about 22ft on a side. With about 17x17ft open basement.

    I'm thinking some timbers in the basement..
    a backhoe and builduild a foundation wall under the house.
    If the stone wall comes down, that's OK too.
    If not bhoe it down too.
    Leave a hole in the wall big enough for a small loader.
    Ray, Aug 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Ray

    Spinman Guest

    I have lowered a basement by 3'. done in 4' sections skipping every other
    4'. and when completed we went back in filled the every other section.
    footings and all. the house had 6' walls and now has 9' (less the 4" slab)
    It was ALLOT of hand digging and it was all done from the inside. Anything
    is possible if you have the money. Short of picking up the whole house and
    moving it out of the way I don't see how you could do it all at once.

    Vince
    "Ray" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >CowPoo <(nospam)> wrote:

    > This is an oldie but a goodie
    > Lazenby opined about antiques and cherished older homes
    > and call the Historical Societty first..
    > The foundation might be worthy of being preserved.
    >
    > >I am considering purchasing a home which is in need of a new basement.
    > >The home is approx. 100 years old with stone basement walls.
    > >Over the years the basement walls have moved in, i'm guessing because
    > >of moisture and trees planted too close to the house. Some large
    > >concrete slabs were placed behind the walls at some point to stop
    > >the movement, but I am unsure of how long ago these were built.
    > >They are showing signs of cracks and movement. Photos are
    > >available if needed, email me at .
    > >
    > >There's only 290 sq.ft. in the basement and the height is 5 ft..
    > >The first floor of the home is about 450 sq.ft.
    > >I would like to lift the house and have a new basement built
    > >with 8 foot ceilings and under the entire first floor, 450 sq.ft..
    > >
    > >Is this possible?

    >
    > It sound to me like the house may be sitting on
    > 1. The ground or
    > 2, The floor joists and there is nothing under the perimeter walls.
    > Now we don't know what the house costuction is.
    > It could be brick, it could be frame.
    > But Its about 22ft on a side. With about 17x17ft open basement.
    >
    > I'm thinking some timbers in the basement..
    > a backhoe and builduild a foundation wall under the house.
    > If the stone wall comes down, that's OK too.
    > If not bhoe it down too.
    > Leave a hole in the wall big enough for a small loader.
    >
    Spinman, Sep 1, 2003
    #2
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  3. Ray

    Ray Guest

    "Spinman" <> wrote:

    >I have lowered a basement by 3'. done in 4' sections skipping every other
    >4'. and when completed we went back in filled the every other section.
    >footings and all. the house had 6' walls and now has 9' (less the 4" slab)
    >It was ALLOT of hand digging and it was all done from the inside. Anything
    >is possible if you have the money. Short of picking up the whole house and
    >moving it out of the way I don't see how you could do it all at once.


    The may be good reasons to move a House.
    I don't think repairing or replacing the foundation,
    Or lowering or raising the house are among them.

    This isn't the OPs house.
    You also had more to work with than my "problem" house.

    My son has an old house on a stone/mortar foundation.
    It was built like Topsy (It just growed.)
    Plumbers and electricians had their way with it too.
    The basement is only about 6 ft high with posts here and there
    holding things up, and a humongous abandoned cast iron boiler
    With no way to get it out.

    The commercial professional way to do the job, and double
    the sunk cost, might be to poke holes in the walls for steel beams,
    and jack up the house. And rest the beams on RailRoad tie piers.
    (I haven't analyzed the structure enough to give an opinion.)
    No reason to, It is what it is. And all we need is head room.

    My solution is to dig down 2 ft and leave the wall as is.
    And, like you work in sections but only 2ft skip 4ft.
    If thinking of driving 2 x 4 ft sheet shoreing, using the
    weight of the house, and a hydraulic ram.
    Ram a little dig a little.. Maybe use a trencher.
    Maybe buy and modify for close wall work.

    It's an "experimental" project..
    That means, learn as you go.
    Need a test run to see how far I can drive the sheet.
    Material options are corrugated steel, or 1/2 or 1" sheet concrete.
    I plan on an exit/ entry ramp to do the real earth moving.
    And drag the furnace out.
    (It'll become part of an addition he wants.)
    Ray, Sep 2, 2003
    #3
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