Rats in attic insulation...

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Mark, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Got a bit of a rat problem.
    Some rats are living in the small roofspace (8 feet x 3 feet x 4 feet
    approx) above my kitchen which juts out from the main house. They're also
    heard in the main attic, and in the wall cavity of both houses.
    The local council only provides an advisory service and say the house (and
    adjoining neighbour's house) has had a long history of rats, and cant offer
    any further advice.
    I've got 4 B&Q rat traps in the main attic, and 9 of them in the small
    kitchen attic - most baited with chocolate and chocolate biscuits. I check
    the roofspaces every fortnight and no traps have been touched. There's some
    poison up there too, B&Q rat killer stuff, but it hasnt been eaten.

    In the small roofspace above the kitchen, I can see tunnels in the
    insulation where they're living and any time I poke my head up there I hear
    them scurrying away into the tunnels.

    Had a drain specialist out who put cameras down the drains, but came up with
    no sources of entry. Found a possible point of entry and have blocked it up,
    so there may be no way for them to get out. In any case, i'd like them to
    leave in a rat trap so I can be sure they're dead and out, and dont cause a
    stink in an inaccessible place.

    I've had a cat for a year now. I've let it have a sniff around in the main
    attic and even brushed it up there to get its hairs around to put the rats
    off settling there. Doesnt seem to have had any effect.

    Considering getting protective equipment and pulling all the insulation down
    from above the kitchen, unless any of you can give me any advice. I imagine
    they may attack when I start dismantling their "home".

    Any advice?

    thanks,
    Mark.
    Mark, Feb 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mark

    sam ende Guest

    Mark wrote:


    > Considering getting protective equipment and pulling all the
    > insulation down from above the kitchen, unless any of you can give me
    > any advice. I imagine they may attack when I start dismantling their
    > "home".
    >
    > Any advice?



    can't imagine the council saying it's not a (their) problem, we have had
    them in at work re ants, and they've sprayed and allsorts, eventhough,
    technically ants are not a health hazard, rats on the other hand
    certainly are. not that hta'ts any immeadiate help to you i know but
    really i think the council should be more concerned/help.
    for instance quick google show that sailibery offer no charge rat
    control services for domestic living;
    http://www.salisbury.gov.uk/living/pest-control/charges.asp

    sammi
    sam ende, Feb 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. Mark

    Sneezy Guest

    "Mark" <> wrote in
    news:3WRZb.25$ta.1@newsfe1-win:

    >
    > Got a bit of a rat problem.
    > Some rats are living in the small roofspace (8 feet x 3 feet x 4 feet
    > approx) above my kitchen which juts out from the main house. They're
    > also heard in the main attic, and in the wall cavity of both houses.
    > The local council only provides an advisory service and say the house
    > (and adjoining neighbour's house) has had a long history of rats, and
    > cant offer any further advice.
    > I've got 4 B&Q rat traps in the main attic, and 9 of them in the small
    > kitchen attic - most baited with chocolate and chocolate biscuits. I
    > check the roofspaces every fortnight and no traps have been touched.
    > There's some poison up there too, B&Q rat killer stuff, but it hasnt
    > been eaten.
    >
    > Any advice?
    >


    They are neophobic for a start, also look for signs on the ground outside -
    sort of "mini-troughs" in soil, holes in fencing with greasy edges,
    undergrowth with tunnels through it. If they're not eating the food you
    provide (i.e. on the traps and in the bait trays) ask yourself whose food
    they are eating and how are they getting it? They're not going to eat what
    you provide if they're getting their fill elsewhere :)

    --
    john

    "Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what
    they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand." -
    Putt's Law
    Sneezy, Feb 21, 2004
    #3
  4. Mark

    PoP Guest

    On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 23:39:25 -0000, "Mark"
    <> wrote:

    >I've had a cat for a year now. I've let it have a sniff around in the main
    >attic and even brushed it up there to get its hairs around to put the rats
    >off settling there. Doesnt seem to have had any effect.


    Put your cat on a diet. It might develop a taste for fresh rat ;)

    Only kidding. I wonder if it would be worth putting one of those
    ultrasonic devices up there - nothing to lose except the £15 purchase
    price and if it works it would be a cheap option:

    http://www.maplin.co.uk

    Search for "pest repellent".

    PoP

    -----

    My published email address probably won't work. If
    you need to contact me please submit your comments
    via the web form at http://www.anyoldtripe.co.uk

    I apologise for the additional effort, however the
    level of unsolicited email I receive makes it
    impossible to advertise my real email address!
    PoP, Feb 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "PoP" <> wrote in message

    > >I've had a cat for a year now. I've let it have a sniff around in the

    main
    > >attic and even brushed it up there to get its hairs around to put the

    rats
    > >off settling there. Doesnt seem to have had any effect.

    >
    > Put your cat on a diet. It might develop a taste for fresh rat ;)
    > Only kidding. I wonder if it would be worth putting one of those
    > ultrasonic devices up there - nothing to lose except the £15 purchase
    > price and if it works it would be a cheap option:
    > http://www.maplin.co.uk
    >
    > Search for "pest repellent".
    > PoP


    Already thought of that idea: bought one from B&Q last week and when I took
    it home, the small print instructions inside said that it would not work
    through objects such as walls or windows. I assume it wont work through the
    plasterboard or insulation, so I took it back. Anyway, from what I read on
    here, not many people claim they work.
    Mark.
    Mark, Feb 22, 2004
    #5
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "sam ende" <> wrote
    > can't imagine the council saying it's not a (their) problem, we have had
    > them in at work re ants, and they've sprayed and allsorts, eventhough,
    > technically ants are not a health hazard, rats on the other hand
    > certainly are. not that hta'ts any immeadiate help to you i know but
    > really i think the council should be more concerned/help.
    > for instance quick google show that sailibery offer no charge rat
    > control services for domestic living;
    > http://www.salisbury.gov.uk/living/pest-control/charges.asp
    >
    > sammi



    Lucky you!
    My local council,
    http://www.castlereagh.gov.uk/faq/FAQS3.htm They only give out free advice.
    Mark, Feb 22, 2004
    #6
  7. Mark

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <3WRZb.25$ta.1@newsfe1-win>, Mark <markas.REMOVE.shaw@hotmail
    ..com> writes
    >
    >Got a bit of a rat problem.
    >Some rats are living in the small roofspace (8 feet x 3 feet x 4 feet
    >approx) above my kitchen which juts out from the main house. They're also
    >heard in the main attic, and in the wall cavity of both houses.
    >The local council only provides an advisory service and say the house (and
    >adjoining neighbour's house) has had a long history of rats, and cant offer
    >any further advice.


    Bet they would if their chief executive lived there:-(

    >I've got 4 B&Q rat traps in the main attic, and 9 of them in the small
    >kitchen attic - most baited with chocolate and chocolate biscuits. I check
    >the roofspaces every fortnight and no traps have been touched. There's some
    >poison up there too, B&Q rat killer stuff, but it hasnt been eaten.


    So just where are they getting their daily bread?.
    >
    >In the small roofspace above the kitchen, I can see tunnels in the
    >insulation where they're living and any time I poke my head up there I hear
    >them scurrying away into the tunnels.
    >
    >Had a drain specialist out who put cameras down the drains, but came up with
    >no sources of entry. Found a possible point of entry and have blocked it up,
    >so there may be no way for them to get out. In any case, i'd like them to
    >leave in a rat trap so I can be sure they're dead and out, and dont cause a
    >stink in an inaccessible place.
    >


    Well the stink will fade after a while.

    >I've had a cat for a year now. I've let it have a sniff around in the main
    >attic and even brushed it up there to get its hairs around to put the rats
    >off settling there. Doesnt seem to have had any effect.


    Starve cat and leave in roofspace for a day or so;-).

    In a recent survey 99.999% of domestic cats were obese....
    >
    >Considering getting protective equipment and pulling all the insulation down
    >from above the kitchen, unless any of you can give me any advice. I imagine
    >they may attack when I start dismantling their "home".


    Have you tried asking the local pest control services in the private
    sector?..

    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Feb 22, 2004
    #7
  8. Mark

    PoP Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 09:57:09 -0000, "Mark"
    <> wrote:

    >Already thought of that idea: bought one from B&Q last week and when I took
    >it home, the small print instructions inside said that it would not work
    >through objects such as walls or windows. I assume it wont work through the
    >plasterboard or insulation, so I took it back. Anyway, from what I read on
    >here, not many people claim they work.


    High frequency won't penetrate boards or walls, unless it is delivered
    at significant power. The idea would be to put it directly where the
    varmints run.

    As for whether they work or not I can't comment. But given the
    circumstances I would be inclined to give it a go - after all, you can
    always try it out for a couple of days then take it back to B&Q if it
    changes nothing! And if it did work then you've got a cheap solution!

    PoP

    -----

    My published email address probably won't work. If
    you need to contact me please submit your comments
    via the web form at http://www.anyoldtripe.co.uk

    I apologise for the additional effort, however the
    level of unsolicited email I receive makes it
    impossible to advertise my real email address!
    PoP, Feb 22, 2004
    #8
  9. Mark

    Chris Howard Guest

    It sounds to me like you need the services of a professional pest
    control man (or woman). - not very DIY I know.

    I had one round last year.
    - I had rats in a ceiling.

    He used some blocks of poison, which I believe are only available to
    professionals.
    - I think the manufacturer is sorex. - http://www.sorex.com/

    We managed to keep my rat out by blocking it's entry point.

    Apparently rats love the blocks he put down, and if one was still
    around it would definitely taken it.
    - he told me he recently put 12 quite large blocks down in a farm with
    a rat problem - they ate the lot.

    Interestingly he used wire to fix the block to the ceiling joist, that
    way the rat couldn't run off with it to it's hidy hole and it meant
    that he could examine it to see how much had been taken.

    Also, he told me that by law, all traps must be checked every 24
    hours. A trap may not instantly kill, and may cause unneccesary
    suffering.

    By the way, you do want to get rid of them - for some reason they love
    to chew mains wiring.

    Regards,

    Chris.
    Chris Howard, Feb 22, 2004
    #9
  10. Mark

    Pete C Guest

    Hi,

    Block up any possible points of entry with newspaper to find out where
    they're getting in.

    cheers,
    Pete.

    On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 23:39:25 -0000, "Mark"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >Got a bit of a rat problem.
    >Some rats are living in the small roofspace (8 feet x 3 feet x 4 feet
    >approx) above my kitchen which juts out from the main house. They're also
    >heard in the main attic, and in the wall cavity of both houses.
    >The local council only provides an advisory service and say the house (and
    >adjoining neighbour's house) has had a long history of rats, and cant offer
    >any further advice.
    >I've got 4 B&Q rat traps in the main attic, and 9 of them in the small
    >kitchen attic - most baited with chocolate and chocolate biscuits. I check
    >the roofspaces every fortnight and no traps have been touched. There's some
    >poison up there too, B&Q rat killer stuff, but it hasnt been eaten.
    >
    >In the small roofspace above the kitchen, I can see tunnels in the
    >insulation where they're living and any time I poke my head up there I hear
    >them scurrying away into the tunnels.
    >
    >Had a drain specialist out who put cameras down the drains, but came up with
    >no sources of entry. Found a possible point of entry and have blocked it up,
    >so there may be no way for them to get out. In any case, i'd like them to
    >leave in a rat trap so I can be sure they're dead and out, and dont cause a
    >stink in an inaccessible place.
    >
    >I've had a cat for a year now. I've let it have a sniff around in the main
    >attic and even brushed it up there to get its hairs around to put the rats
    >off settling there. Doesnt seem to have had any effect.
    >
    >Considering getting protective equipment and pulling all the insulation down
    >from above the kitchen, unless any of you can give me any advice. I imagine
    >they may attack when I start dismantling their "home".
    >
    >Any advice?
    >
    >thanks,
    >Mark.
    >
    Pete C, Feb 22, 2004
    #10
  11. On 22 Feb 2004 14:23:25 -0800, Chris Howard wrote:

    > Also, he told me that by law, all traps must be checked every 24
    > hours. A trap may not instantly kill, and may cause unneccesary
    > suffering.


    And a rat trapped by something "disposable" like a leg or tail will
    gnaw through trapped part to escape. All we ever caught of the three
    rats that tried to join us was 2" of tail and a blood stain...

    --
    Cheers
    Dave. pam is missing e-mail
    Dave Liquorice, Feb 23, 2004
    #11
  12. Mark

    Sneezy Guest

    (Chris Howard) wrote in
    news::

    > Interestingly he used wire to fix the block to the ceiling joist, that
    > way the rat couldn't run off with it to it's hidy hole and it meant
    > that he could examine it to see how much had been taken.
    >


    They (rats) have been known to carry bones from graveyards - lift your
    floorboards and it looks like a serial killer's being busy :)

    One option would be to invest in a pair of night vision goggles and wait
    for them armed with an air rifle. Just a thought.

    --
    john

    "Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what
    they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand." -
    Putt's Law
    Sneezy, Feb 23, 2004
    #12
  13. Mark

    misterroy Guest

    just seen off 16 of the pesky beggers, did not catch one in the loft
    space, even though they were up there alongside traps. i put the traps at
    the side of the house beside the entry points. I used cage traps and tied
    bacon with cotton thread to the trigger, and set the trigger as sensitivly
    as possible. I took about 3 months and I got 15 this way. Number 16 was
    stupid enough to run across the conservatory while i had a screwdriver in
    my hand.

    happy hunting
    misterroy, Feb 23, 2004
    #13
  14. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "misterroy" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > just seen off 16 of the pesky beggers, did not catch one in the loft
    > space, even though they were up there alongside traps. i put the traps at
    > the side of the house beside the entry points. I used cage traps and tied
    > bacon with cotton thread to the trigger, and set the trigger as sensitivly
    > as possible. I took about 3 months and I got 15 this way. Number 16 was
    > stupid enough to run across the conservatory while i had a screwdriver in
    > my hand.


    where did you get the cage traps or did you make them yourself?
    Mark, Feb 23, 2004
    #14
  15. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Chris Howard" <> wrote in message

    > It sounds to me like you need the services of a professional pest
    > control man (or woman). - not very DIY I know.


    Its beginning to look that way...
    Thanks for the link, btw.

    > By the way, you do want to get rid of them - for some reason they love
    > to chew mains wiring.


    So I've heard. I was thinking of getting up into the small roofspace this
    saturday with a long cable, the other end would be connected to a 13A plug
    socket downstairs. By poking the cable in through the insulation into their
    home, I may be able to electrocute a few. I'll just need to be careful not
    to touch the live part of the cable myself... Surely this would kill them?
    Mark, Feb 23, 2004
    #15
  16. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Sneezy" <> wrote in message

    > One option would be to invest in a pair of night vision goggles and wait
    > for them armed with an air rifle. Just a thought.


    A very entertaining idea, and would be one to pursue if the rats were in the
    open.
    thanks anyway,
    Mark.
    Mark, Feb 23, 2004
    #16
  17. Mark

    misterroy Guest

    I bought two in a local shop the other two are borrowed from next door.
    His solution was two cats. Similar traps are the top two on this page

    http://www.trap-man.com/rat-traps.htm

    the Modern Live capture"Family"Rat Trap being the best

    happy hunting
    misterroy, Feb 23, 2004
    #17
  18. Mark

    Huge Guest

    (Chris Howard) writes:
    >It sounds to me like you need the services of a professional pest
    >control man (or woman). - not very DIY I know.
    >
    >I had one round last year.
    >- I had rats in a ceiling.
    >
    >He used some blocks of poison, which I believe are only available to
    >professionals.
    >- I think the manufacturer is sorex. - http://www.sorex.com/


    Sorexa baitblocks are available to amateurs. I buy it from farmrite;

    http://www.farmrite.co.uk/product.php?code=5012471380258&prev_cat=94#detail

    They also do different sizes of drums, and loose pelleted bait.

    --
    "The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
    [email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
    Huge, Feb 23, 2004
    #18
  19. Mark

    Tim Mitchell Guest

    In article <kHq_b.1330$>, Mark
    <> writes
    >
    >"Chris Howard" <> wrote in message
    >
    >> By the way, you do want to get rid of them - for some reason they love
    >> to chew mains wiring.

    >
    >So I've heard. I was thinking of getting up into the small roofspace this
    >saturday with a long cable, the other end would be connected to a 13A plug
    >socket downstairs. By poking the cable in through the insulation into their
    >home, I may be able to electrocute a few. I'll just need to be careful not
    >to touch the live part of the cable myself... Surely this would kill them?
    >

    I doubt it would, unless you can get both live & neutral to make contact
    (& not touch each other.) The rat is not going to have a very good
    connection to earth. They might feel a bit of a tingle but that's about
    all.

    --
    Tim Mitchell
    Tim Mitchell, Feb 24, 2004
    #19
  20. Mark

    Sneezy Guest

    Tim Mitchell <> wrote in
    news:gX7xc$:

    > In article <kHq_b.1330$>, Mark
    > <> writes
    >>
    >>"Chris Howard" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >>> By the way, you do want to get rid of them - for some reason they
    >>> love to chew mains wiring.

    >>
    >>So I've heard. I was thinking of getting up into the small roofspace
    >>this saturday with a long cable, the other end would be connected to a
    >>13A plug socket downstairs. By poking the cable in through the
    >>insulation into their home, I may be able to electrocute a few. I'll
    >>just need to be careful not to touch the live part of the cable
    >>myself... Surely this would kill them?
    >>

    > I doubt it would, unless you can get both live & neutral to make
    > contact (& not touch each other.) The rat is not going to have a very
    > good connection to earth. They might feel a bit of a tingle but that's
    > about all.
    >


    Life of Grime where the rat had died after chewing one of the wires under
    the bonnet of a car?? The heat accelerated decomposition. CSI demonstrated
    how even low voltages can kill providing the current crosses the heart. If
    that's a human, it must apply to rat surely??

    --
    john

    "Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what
    they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand." -
    Putt's Law
    Sneezy, Feb 26, 2004
    #20
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