Push fit plumbing - any good?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Dave, Sep 26, 2004.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I've always used soldered joints but am being tempted by the Tectite
    push-fit range for a heating re-furb I'm about to embark on - maybe even
    plastic pipe rather than copper! How long have they been around? Any horror
    stories? Are there any other competing ranges I should consider?

    Dave S
    Dave, Sep 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've always used soldered joints but am being tempted by the Tectite
    > push-fit range for a heating re-furb I'm about to embark on - maybe even
    > plastic pipe rather than copper! How long have they been around? Any

    horror
    > stories? Are there any other competing ranges I should consider?
    >
    > Dave S


    Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic pipe when
    you need to.
    IMM, Sep 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    IMM wrote:

    > Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic pipe when
    > you need to.



    Your opinion on the subject changes every time you post on it! That
    includes your favourite brand.

    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Grunff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > > Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic pipe

    when
    > > you need to.

    >
    > Your opinion on the subject changes every time you post on it! That
    > includes your favourite brand.


    Another mentalist.
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    Andy Hall wrote:

    > There are numerous brands. I've used
    >
    > - Hep2o
    > - JG Speedfit
    > - Marley Equator
    > - Tectite



    I've also used all of the above, as well as CuproFit, and have had no
    problems with any of them.

    I recently tried the ToolsStation offering, made by QualPlumb. They are
    similar in construction to Hep fittings, but come in white plastic. I
    was quite impressed with them.


    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Dave <> wrote:
    > I've always used soldered joints but am being tempted by the Tectite
    > push-fit range for a heating re-furb I'm about to embark on - maybe even
    > plastic pipe rather than copper! How long have they been around? Any
    > horror stories? Are there any other competing ranges I should consider?


    Check out the price. If you've got decent 'copper' skills, you'll save
    quite a bit of money. Neater job too.

    Plastic can be easier to route under floors, though.

    --
    *Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it *

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Andy Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 00:04:01 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    > >IMM wrote:
    > >
    > >> Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic pipe

    when
    > >> you need to.

    > >
    > >
    > >Your opinion on the subject changes every time you post on it! That
    > >includes your favourite brand.

    >
    > Generally these change quarterly, as opposed to the heating solution
    > of the month.
    >
    > Speedfit is out of favour at present, ever since the hacksaw incident.


    What incident was that? Speedfit has always been out of favour.
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #7
  8. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Grunff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Andy Hall wrote:
    >
    > > There are numerous brands. I've used
    > >
    > > - Hep2o
    > > - JG Speedfit
    > > - Marley Equator
    > > - Tectite

    >
    > I've also used all of the above, as well as CuproFit, and have had no
    > problems with any of them.
    >
    > I recently tried the ToolsStation offering, made by QualPlumb. They are
    > similar in construction to Hep fittings, but come in white plastic. I
    > was quite impressed with them.


    Who makes them? The Homebase own brand is made by Speedfit. Is it Hepworth
    just changing the colour?
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #8
  9. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Andy Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    .... snipped
    > There are numerous brands. I've used
    >
    > - Hep2o
    > - JG Speedfit
    > - Marley Equator
    > - Tectite


    Are there any huge price differences between the brands? - presumably the
    pipe and fittings are all made to a standard so are interchangeable(?)

    > and had no problems with any of them on either copper or barrier
    > plastic tube.
    >
    > It is important to follow the instructions for bending and securing
    > and also to cut using a proper pipe cutter.


    What's special about the pipe cutter? I see that Screwfix have got a cheap
    one and an expensive one - any experience with them?

    > .andy
    >


    Thanks,
    Dave S
    Dave, Sep 27, 2004
    #9
  10. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    IMM wrote:

    > Who makes them? The Homebase own brand is made by Speedfit. Is it Hepworth
    > just changing the colour?


    <http://www.qpl.ie/html/QP.html>


    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #10
  11. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Andy Hall" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > ... snipped
    > > There are numerous brands. I've used
    > >
    > > - Hep2o
    > > - JG Speedfit
    > > - Marley Equator
    > > - Tectite

    >
    > Are there any huge price differences between the brands?


    Not really. All are expensive compared to copper pipe and end feed fittings.

    > - presumably the
    > pipe and fittings are all made to a
    > standard so are interchangeable(?)


    In theory, yes, as they all have to conform to a standard. In practice, no.
    Hepworth say do not interchange as makers tolerances are different.

    > > and had no problems with any of them on either copper or barrier
    > > plastic tube.
    > >
    > > It is important to follow the instructions for bending and securing
    > > and also to cut using a proper pipe cutter.

    >
    > What's special about the pipe cutter?


    It gives a clean straight cut very quickly. You can acheive this with other
    tools, but it will take longer.

    > I see that Screwfix have got a cheap
    > one and an expensive one - any experience with them?
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #11
  12. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    Dave wrote:

    > Are there any huge price differences between the brands?


    The main difference in price comes from where you buy them and how many
    you buy. The most expensive way of buying them is to buy just one from
    B&Q or a plumbers merchant. The cheapest way is to buy a bag of 10 from
    Screwfix or Toolstation.

    > - presumably the
    > pipe and fittings are all made to a standard so are interchangeable(?)


    They all use standard pipe, so 10mm, 15mm, 22mm, 28mm are the main
    sizes. The only thing to look out for is pipe inserts. When using
    plastic pipe, you need to use plastic/copper/s.steel inserts in the end
    of the pipe. Use the correct insert for the fitting.



    > What's special about the pipe cutter? I see that Screwfix have got a cheap
    > one and an expensive one - any experience with them?


    I have one of each. The SpeedFit cutter (blue) is by far the best way of
    cutting. It's very quick, and gives nice clean square cuts. The cheap
    Screwfix cutter (red) is ratchetting, and is good for cutting big MDPE
    pipe. Does a pretty good job on 12/22mm PEX pipe, but not as quick as
    the blue cutter.


    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Dave

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Grunff" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > IMM wrote:
    > >
    > > > Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic

    pipe
    > when
    > > > you need to.

    > >
    > > Your opinion on the subject changes every time you post on it! That
    > > includes your favourite brand.

    >
    > Another mentalist.
    >


    But who was ranting on about how bad push fit couplings were a couple of
    months ago, when a certain someone f*cked up a fiends pluming because he
    couldn't read the instructions ?...

    Surely it wasn't the same 'IMM' as who has just posted the above message ?!
    :::Jerry::::, Sep 27, 2004
    #13
  14. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    IMM wrote:

    >>What's special about the pipe cutter?

    >
    >
    > It gives a clean straight cut very quickly. You can acheive this with other
    > tools, but it will take longer.


    At this point it's worth googling for a little thread we had a while
    back. <http://tinyurl.com/42ke4>


    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #14
  15. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Grunff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > >>What's special about the pipe cutter?

    > >
    > >
    > > It gives a clean straight cut very quickly. You can acheive this with

    other
    > > tools, but it will take longer.

    >
    > At this point it's worth googling for a little thread we had a while
    > back. <http://tinyurl.com/42ke4>


    It is not worth it. "It gives a clean straight cut very quickly. You can
    acheive this with other tools, but it will take longer." That is all you
    need to know.
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #15
  16. Dave

    Grunff Guest

    Andy Hall wrote:

    > You do have to read and follow the instructions.


    Well, you say that...

    After that little hacksaw thread I did a fair bit of playing around with
    various pushfit fittings, being of a curious disposition. It's actually
    really, *really* hard to get one to leak.

    The easiest to damage were CuproFit, where the O ring can be pushed out
    if you insert the pipe at a sharpish angle. I failed to make any
    speedfit or hep fitting leak while 'making' them, or subsequently by
    applying sideways pressure to the pipe. In both JG and Hep fittings it
    was the plastic casing that broke first.

    On another matter, 3 years ago I installed a 'temporary' water valve
    outside near the stables. This made use of 3 JG fittings and a Pegler
    1/4 turn ball valve. It has been sitting on a concrete block outside for
    3 years, through quite a few freeze/thaw cycles. No leaks yet from the
    fittings, but I had to replace the valve last year because of frost damage.

    --
    Grunff
    Grunff, Sep 27, 2004
    #16
  17. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Andy Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 08:05:52 +0100, "IMM" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Andy Hall" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 00:04:01 +0100, Grunff <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >IMM wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Pushfit Tectite is good. Keep to copper pipe and only use plastic

    pipe
    > >when
    > >> >> you need to.
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >Your opinion on the subject changes every time you post on it! That
    > >> >includes your favourite brand.
    > >>
    > >> Generally these change quarterly, as opposed to the heating solution
    > >> of the month.
    > >>
    > >> Speedfit is out of favour at present, ever since the hacksaw incident.

    > >
    > >What incident was that?

    >
    > <http://tinyurl.com/42ke4>
    >
    >
    > Surely you remember.....


    No incident with an hacksaw. the hacksaw worked perfectly.

    I'm sure you have never seen one of these never mind use one:
    http://www.toolstation.com/images/library/stock/webbig/34311.jpg

    The right hand side is the handle. Then make sure the serrated part is
    facing down. Don't let the kids near it.
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Dave Plowman (News)" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > Dave <> wrote:

    .... snipped
    > Check out the price. If you've got decent 'copper' skills, you'll save
    > quite a bit of money. Neater job too.


    The "copper skills" are reasonable but I normally use solder ring fittings
    rather than end fed. The only time I had a problem was when I was using some
    old fittings and a previously-tinned end on the pipe; the old fittings had
    leaded solder rings and the tinning used lead-free :-(
    Now I look at the symbol on the fitting!

    >
    > Plastic can be easier to route under floors, though.
    >
    > --
    > *Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it *
    >
    > Dave Plowman London SW
    > To e-mail, change noise into sound.


    What type of fitting do I use to adapt from a poly rising main to copper?
    Currently the main goes straight to 15mm copper using some sort of brass
    fitting but I want to change this to 22mm, unfortunately it's in a corner
    and near the floor so it's going to be a b*gger of a job.

    Dave S
    Dave, Sep 27, 2004
    #18
  19. Dave

    IMM Guest

    "Grunff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Andy Hall wrote:
    >
    > > You do have to read and follow the instructions.

    >
    > Well, you say that...
    >
    > After that little hacksaw thread I did a fair bit of playing around with
    > various pushfit fittings, being of a curious disposition. It's actually
    > really, *really* hard to get one to leak.
    >
    > The easiest to damage were CuproFit, where the O ring can be pushed out
    > if you insert the pipe at a sharpish angle. I failed to make any
    > speedfit or hep fitting leak while 'making' them, or subsequently by
    > applying sideways pressure to the pipe. In both JG and Hep fittings it
    > was the plastic casing that broke first.


    A heating engineer I know is working on sites installing Hep2O. O rings
    being dislodged after the pipe is installed is pretty common. The fitting
    failure rate is high averaging one every second house. It takes a hell of
    an effort to push these fitting home which the installers don't particularly
    like, especially in tight corners. In many instances a normal compression
    joint would be better. Many fittings fail after a test (all systems are
    pressure tested) and when the same fitting is taken off and replaced it
    holds. Small amounts of dust/dirt can make a leak.

    None of them are too fussed on plastic pipe and think it is more of a
    hindrance because of the constant failures on the first fix. When they do a
    soldered joint they know it will hold. The odd compression joint weeping
    usually means just a quick tighten up. Installing copper on first fix is
    just as easy to these guys, if not easier than plastic pipe. Plastic
    requires more clips. They say it does not cut installation time.

    Plastic Is only used so the Travellers will not strip out the copper
    overnight.

    > On another matter, 3 years ago I installed a 'temporary' water valve
    > outside near the stables. This made use of 3 JG fittings and a Pegler
    > 1/4 turn ball valve. It has been sitting on a concrete block outside for


    > 3 years, through quite a few freeze/thaw cycles. No leaks yet from the
    > fittings, but I had to replace the valve last year because of frost

    damage.

    That is one of plastics advantages. It is resistant to freezing.
    IMM, Sep 27, 2004
    #19
  20. Dave

    StealthUK Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > I've always used soldered joints but am being tempted by the Tectite
    > push-fit range for a heating re-furb I'm about to embark on - maybe even
    > plastic pipe rather than copper! How long have they been around? Any horror
    > stories? Are there any other competing ranges I should consider?
    >
    > Dave S


    I've been using JG Speedfit for the last couple of years. They have a
    twist lock feature on them which stops the pipe moving around and
    tightens the seal ring around the pipe after insertion. Never had a
    problem with them.

    For straight runs and where pipes will be visible I still use copper
    pipe. Plastic is great and time saving everywhere else.
    StealthUK, Sep 27, 2004
    #20
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