plastering plasterboard

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by freepo, Sep 17, 2008.

  1. freepo

    freepo Guest

    Plasterboard has two sides, usually an ivory side and a matt paper
    side (i think).

    Supposed to wallpaper onto ivory side and plaster onto matt paper
    side.

    My ceiling boards are foil backed, and have been installed already
    with foil side in the loft, but the ceiling side is ivory, and I want
    to plaster them.

    Will it be ok to plaster onto ivory side on a ceiling?

    Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?

    Thanks
    freepo, Sep 17, 2008
    #1
  2. freepo

    Guest

    On 17 Sep, 13:19, freepo <> wrote:
    > Plasterboard has two sides, usually an ivory side and a matt paper
    > side (i think).
    >
    > Supposed to wallpaper onto ivory side and plaster onto matt paper
    > side.
    >
    > My ceiling boards are foil backed, and have been installed already
    > with foil side in the loft, but the ceiling side is ivory,  and I want
    > to plaster them.
    >
    > Will it be ok to plaster onto ivory side on a ceiling?
    >
    > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > there is no gap between them.  Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?
    >
    > Thanks


    I had the same 2 issues - and the plasterer had no problem making a
    good job.
    I think a coat of PVA on the ivory side will make it suitable for
    plastering.

    Mark.
    , Sep 17, 2008
    #2
  3. freepo

    sm_jamieson Guest

    On 17 Sep, 13:22, wrote:
    > On 17 Sep, 13:19, freepo <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Plasterboard has two sides, usually an ivory side and a matt paper
    > > side (i think).

    >
    > > Supposed to wallpaper onto ivory side and plaster onto matt paper
    > > side.

    >
    > > My ceiling boards are foil backed, and have been installed already
    > > with foil side in the loft, but the ceiling side is ivory, and I want
    > > to plaster them.

    >
    > > Will it be ok to plaster onto ivory side on a ceiling?

    >
    > > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > > there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?

    >
    > > Thanks

    >
    > I had the same 2 issues - and the plasterer had no problem making a
    > good job.
    > I think a coat of PVA on the ivory side will make it suitable for
    > plastering.
    >
    > Mark.


    This has been dealt with many times. *These days*, the ivory side is
    used for all purposes. The other side has a glued flap of paper on it,
    and this flap can become unstuck if plastered over.
    Also, reportedly some plasterers like a gap between the boards to help
    bond them together. However, every time I have boarded for a plasterer
    to skim, I have butted them up and me or the plasterer has stuck the
    scrim tape over the joints. None of them said anything about expecting
    gaps !
    Simon.
    sm_jamieson, Sep 17, 2008
    #3
  4. freepo

    freepo Guest

    On Sep 17, 1:55 pm, sm_jamieson <> wrote:
    > On 17 Sep, 13:22, wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 17 Sep, 13:19, freepo <> wrote:

    >
    > > > Plasterboard has two sides, usually an ivory side and a matt paper
    > > > side (i think).

    >
    > > > Supposed to wallpaper onto ivory side and plaster onto matt paper
    > > > side.

    >
    > > > My ceiling boards are foil backed, and have been installed already
    > > > with foil side in the loft, but the ceiling side is ivory, and I want
    > > > to plaster them.

    >
    > > > Will it be ok to plaster onto ivory side on a ceiling?

    >
    > > > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > > > there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > > > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?

    >
    > > > Thanks

    >
    > > I had the same 2 issues - and the plasterer had no problem making a
    > > good job.
    > > I think a coat of PVA on the ivory side will make it suitable for
    > > plastering.

    >
    > > Mark.

    >
    > This has been dealt with many times. *These days*, the ivory side is
    > used for all purposes. The other side has a glued flap of paper on it,
    > and this flap can become unstuck if plastered over.
    > Also, reportedly some plasterers like a gap between the boards to help
    > bond them together. However, every time I have boarded for a plasterer
    > to skim, I have butted them up and me or the plasterer has stuck the
    > scrim tape over the joints. None of them said anything about expecting
    > gaps !
    > Simon.


    Cool nothing to worry about then. Thanks everyone.
    freepo, Sep 17, 2008
    #4
  5. freepo

    Lobster Guest

    freepo wrote:

    > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?


    Well not long ago I boarded out several walls and ceilings with the
    aformentioned gap between the boards, and got ticked off when the
    plasterer arrived and told me he prefers the boards tight together.

    So go figure...

    David
    Lobster, Sep 17, 2008
    #5
  6. freepo

    Roger Guest

    The message <WWbAk.65422$2>
    from Lobster <> contains these words:

    > > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > > there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?


    > Well not long ago I boarded out several walls and ceilings with the
    > aformentioned gap between the boards, and got ticked off when the
    > plasterer arrived and told me he prefers the boards tight together.


    I am no expect on plastering but ISTM that if you plasterboard a ceiling
    without noggings at the board ends (not that I would) then a gap there
    for plaster to be forced through will do a better job than a tight joint
    and scrim tape. After all lath and plaster is just very short boards and
    a multitude of gaps.

    --
    Roger Chapman
    Roger, Sep 17, 2008
    #6
  7. freepo

    George Guest

    "freepo" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Plasterboard has two sides, usually an ivory side and a matt paper
    > side (i think).
    >
    > Supposed to wallpaper onto ivory side and plaster onto matt paper
    > side.
    >
    > My ceiling boards are foil backed, and have been installed already
    > with foil side in the loft, but the ceiling side is ivory, and I want
    > to plaster them.
    >
    > Will it be ok to plaster onto ivory side on a ceiling?
    >
    > Other problem is that when installing I butted them too close and
    > there is no gap between them. Will it be ok or do I have to use a
    > router and cut a 3mm gap from all the joints?
    >
    > Thanks


    Might be a bit late? but fill the gaps with acrylic sealant and wipe off
    excess,much better than scrim tape.
    George, Sep 17, 2008
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    "Dave Plowman (News)" <> writes:
    > In article <>,
    > Roger <> wrote:
    >> I am no expect on plastering but ISTM that if you plasterboard a ceiling
    >> without noggings at the board ends (not that I would) then a gap there
    >> for plaster to be forced through will do a better job than a tight joint
    >> and scrim tape. After all lath and plaster is just very short boards and
    >> a multitude of gaps.


    Correct, but you still use the scrim tape too, after you've forced
    the plaster through the gap.

    > Trouble is that finish coat is extremely hard and inflexible - as well as
    > being very thin. Plasterboard is made of softer plaster - so any flexing
    > gives obvious results at joins. Lath and plaster is different - the
    > plaster used there is lime and very flexible. At least when new.


    You should really be forcing bonding coat through the gaps.
    Finish coat doesn't have much of a sticking/glueing property,
    and it shrinks enormously as it sets, so a 1/4" wad in a gap
    would definately crack along the gap. Of course, it's annoying
    mixing up a small quantity of bonding coat just for this, but
    if you're using it elsewhere, then you can just slap it in
    when you have it mixed up for other purposes.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, Sep 18, 2008
    #8

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