Planning permission to have second gas+electric mains installed?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Duke, May 15, 2007.

  1. Duke

    Duke Guest

    Can anyone advise if I need planning permission to have the gas &
    electric supply companies install a second gas main and a second
    electric main to the building where I live?

    The house was split into two flats 15 years ago, without planning
    permission. Ever since then, I have lived in one flat and got the
    tenant in the other flat to pay for his/her power via coin meters.

    Now, I want to get extra mains supplies (gas & electricity) for the
    flat that currently has the coin meters. Do I have to apply for
    planning prmission to do this?

    Many thanks,

    Duke
    Duke, May 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. Duke

    Owain Guest

    Duke wrote:
    > Can anyone advise if I need planning permission to have the gas &
    > electric supply companies install a second gas main and a second
    > electric main to the building where I live?
    > The house was split into two flats 15 years ago, without planning
    > permission. Ever since then, I have lived in one flat and got the
    > tenant in the other flat to pay for his/her power via coin meters.
    > Now, I want to get extra mains supplies (gas & electricity) for the
    > flat that currently has the coin meters. Do I have to apply for
    > planning prmission to do this?


    No.

    If the utility cos ask why, but they probably won't, just say you're
    putting in a granny annex rather than a separate dwelling.

    Owain
    Owain, May 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. Duke

    Duke Guest

    On Tue, 15 May 2007 10:10:06 GMT, Tony Bryer <>
    wrote:

    >> Now, I want to get extra mains supplies (gas & electricity) for the
    >> flat that currently has the coin meters. Do I have to apply for
    >> planning prmission to do this?

    >
    >Nothing to do with the planners. But assuming you have proof of the
    >conversion (separate Council Tax bills etc) it might be worth regularising
    >the planning situation ... unless one day you might want to do a reverse
    >conversion, not allowed by some planning departments like ours.


    Tony,
    Yes - that is one of the reasons why I haven't applied for a CLU so
    far; because someone may just want to turn the place back into a
    single dwelling at some point. However, my hand may be forced when I
    come to sell one of the flats. If a buyer insists on a CLU, then I
    will have to decide whether to take that plunge, or withdraw from the
    sale. I'm told that applying for the CLU would be merely a formality,
    but I'm a bit wary that it could open some kind of can of worms or
    other.

    Duke
    Duke, May 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Duke

    Duke Guest

    On Tue, 15 May 2007 10:29:28 +0100, Owain
    <> wrote:

    >> planning prmission to do this?

    >
    >No.
    >
    >If the utility cos ask why, but they probably won't, just say you're
    >putting in a granny annex rather than a separate dwelling.
    >
    >Owain


    Thanks, Owain. Why do you recommend I don't divilge that it's a
    separate dwelling?

    Duke
    Duke, May 15, 2007
    #4
  5. Duke

    Owain Guest

    Duke wrote:
    >>>planning prmission to do this?

    >>No.
    >>If the utility cos ask why, but they probably won't, just say you're
    >>putting in a granny annex rather than a separate dwelling.

    > Thanks, Owain. Why do you recommend I don't divilge that it's a
    > separate dwelling?


    Because then they'll expect a separate postal address for the separate
    premises, which the council would have given you when you got the
    planning permission, which you didn't get :)

    Also if it's only for separately metering a granny annex they might just
    split the existing supply, but if it's for a separate dwelling they
    might insist on a new supply from the street mains - ££££s.

    Owain
    Owain, May 15, 2007
    #5
  6. Duke

    Guest

    > Because then they'll expect a separate postal address for the separate
    > premises, which the council would have given you when you got the
    > planning permission, which you didn't get :)


    Should we assume the OP is defrauding the council tax too? I'd quite
    happily shop him - so the rest of us don't pay as much.
    , May 15, 2007
    #6
  7. Duke

    Duke Guest

    On Tue, 15 May 2007 20:04:42 +0100, Owain
    <> wrote:

    >> Thanks, Owain. Why do you recommend I don't divilge that it's a
    >> separate dwelling?

    >
    >Because then they'll expect a separate postal address for the separate
    >premises, which the council would have given you when you got the
    >planning permission, which you didn't get :)


    The Council Tax Dept *did* though! (Back in 1993 when they first
    assessed the place as two flats.)

    >Also if it's only for separately metering a granny annex they might just
    >split the existing supply, but if it's for a separate dwelling they
    >might insist on a new supply from the street mains - ££££s.


    I guess they will send someone around who will need to look over the
    premises before they decide what can/should be done regards the new
    mains supplies. It's only two one-bed flats (no bigger than the
    original house, so hopefully they can split the existing mains input,
    like you said.

    Regards,

    Duke
    Duke, May 15, 2007
    #7
  8. Duke

    Duke Guest

    On Tue, 15 May 2007 18:10:56 GMT, "ARWadsworth"
    <> wrote:

    >The can of worms is the water supply. It would need to be two metered
    >individual supplies at rip off cost.


    I've heard about that. Yes, it does indeed seem like a rip-off, when
    it's the water company that will profit from it. I hope legislation
    will soon force the water company to pay for it themselves. It seems
    only fair.

    Duke
    Duke, May 15, 2007
    #8
  9. Duke

    Steve Guest

    On Tue, 15 May 2007 13:14:35 +0100, Duke wrote:

    > However, my hand may be forced when I
    > come to sell one of the flats. If a buyer insists on a CLU, then I
    > will have to decide whether to take that plunge, or withdraw from the
    > sale.


    My old flat was the same, converted about 88. The buyers "solicitor"
    (useless internet conveyancing firm) brought the issue up, my solicitor
    basically told him not to be an arse, and that was the end of that, sale
    went through fine.

    You have to suspect there are hundreds of thousands of properties in the
    same situation, it must come up all the time.

    Steve
    Steve, May 16, 2007
    #9
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