Painting a steam radiator

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Chuck Reti, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. Chuck Reti

    Chuck Reti Guest

    My house, mid-20s vintage, is steam heated (boiler was "modernized"
    mid-70s).
    We're redoing a room and I've wirebrushed the ancient flaky paint off the
    radiator. Wondering what's the best repainting solution. Want it to be
    same color as the baseboard and trim, which are painted with an
    off-white semigloss latex. I need to prime the bare metal (not rusty),
    but with oil or water based primer? And can the cover coat be the same
    latex as the trim paint? Any issues re wintertime hot radiator coils and
    paint adhesion or odors? I know there are hi-temp "barbecue grill"
    paints but they're gloss enamels and little color choice.
    --
    Chuck Reti
    Detroit MI
     
    Chuck Reti, Jul 23, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Chuck Reti

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 12:31:03 -0400, Phil Munro <>
    wrote:

    > Our house is about the same vintage, also with steam radiators of two
    >different kinds. On several we have used a glossy enamel "rustoleum"
    >type of paint. On another we used a latex. In every case we first
    >stripped the old paint off before applying the new paint, and have had
    >NO trouble with the paint coming off -- except the one time we did NOT
    >strip the old paint off.


    How did you strip the paint off?

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!

    sue at interport dot net
     
    Curly Sue, Jul 24, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Chuck Reti

    Chuck Reti Guest

    In article <>,
    wrote:

    > On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 22:24:19 -0400, Chuck Reti
    > <chuckr*@No*SPAMmac.com.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > >My house, mid-20s vintage, is steam heated (boiler was "modernized"
    > >mid-70s).
    > >We're redoing a room and I've wirebrushed the ancient flaky paint off the
    > >radiator.

    > snip
    >
    > Was this radiator painted with lead paint?


    It may have been, given its age. Having considered that possibility,
    I wore gloves & mask, brushed on a plywood sheet outdoors (no edibles
    growing anywhere, no watershed issues). Swept up what I could and will
    dispose of properly at hazmat dropoff on recycling day. Just trying to be
    Mr. Environmentally correct :).
    Hazards aside, would a lead coat, mostly all removed, affect what should
    go on next?
    --
    Chuck Reti
    Detroit MI
     
    Chuck Reti, Jul 24, 2003
    #3
  4. Chuck Reti

    ameijers Guest

    "Chuck Reti" <chuckr*@No*SPAMmac.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 22:24:19 -0400, Chuck Reti
    > > <chuckr*@No*SPAMmac.com.invalid> wrote:
    > >
    > > >My house, mid-20s vintage, is steam heated (boiler was "modernized"
    > > >mid-70s).
    > > >We're redoing a room and I've wirebrushed the ancient flaky paint off

    the
    > > >radiator.

    > > snip
    > >
    > > Was this radiator painted with lead paint?

    >
    > It may have been, given its age. Having considered that possibility,
    > I wore gloves & mask, brushed on a plywood sheet outdoors (no edibles
    > growing anywhere, no watershed issues). Swept up what I could and will
    > dispose of properly at hazmat dropoff on recycling day. Just trying to be
    > Mr. Environmentally correct :).
    > Hazards aside, would a lead coat, mostly all removed, affect what should
    > go on next?
    > --

    If you already have it loose and out of the house (and most of the crud
    off), I'd take it somewhere and have it shotblasted and electrostatic powder
    painted, and NEVER have to mess with it again. Shops that do that can
    probably also clean out the inside, which should make it work better.

    aem sends...
     
    ameijers, Jul 25, 2003
    #4
  5. Chuck Reti

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 11:48:35 -0400, Phil Munro <>
    wrote:

    > We use a chemical stripper which is very similar to zip strip.
    >I apply it, then scrape with a putty knife, use steel wool, apply some
    >more and steel wool some more. The one I just finished yesterday had
    >some brown paint against the metal. It took a little more effort to
    >remove than places where there was also a top coat of white paint.
    > I have no idea whether any of it is lead paint. Unless sanding or
    >heat is used (and the heat gun does not work on metal surfaces), the
    >lead problem should be minimal.


    Thanks for the reply. Did you know that you can get inexpensive lead
    test kits in the paint department (of, for example, Home Depot)?

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!

    sue at interport dot net
     
    Curly Sue, Jul 25, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. BKS

    painting steam radiator pipe

    BKS, May 17, 2004, in forum: Misc DIY
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    326
    m Ransley
    May 17, 2004
  2. Michael Stoic

    Steam Radiator - ID and Specs.?

    Michael Stoic, Oct 14, 2004, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    184
    HeatMan
    Oct 17, 2004
  3. Michael Stoic

    Steam Radiator Repair - Epoxy

    Michael Stoic, Oct 21, 2004, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    431
    Edwin Pawlowski
    Oct 25, 2004
  4. fnord

    Steam Radiator thread sealant?

    fnord, Oct 15, 2005, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    199
    Lawrence Wasserman
    Oct 17, 2005
  5. anonomous

    steam radiator valve ?

    anonomous, Oct 23, 2005, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    408
    HeatMan
    Oct 26, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page