Need to add a sub panel to an already full Fuse Box

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by Zack, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. Zack

    Zack Guest

    I just recently bought a house that was made in the 1950's. I would
    like to add a hot tub to the house (220V). Protection to the house's
    electrical system is provided by a fuse box - which is full. My
    question is, how do I add a sub panel to the fuse box assuming that the
    electrical system can handle the load? I am assuming that I branch the
    wire directly off (in parallel) of where it comes into the fuse box.
    Zack, Feb 22, 2005
    #1
  2. Zack

    Mikepier Guest

    Do yourself a favor and get a new 200 amp panel. If the fusebox is
    full, theres really no sense in risking overloading it.
    Mikepier, Feb 22, 2005
    #2
  3. Zack

    Zack Guest

    So are you telling me to replace the fuse panel? I really would rather
    not... seems like alot of work. I am checking to see if I have adequate
    service to the house. Assuming I do, I would just like to know how to
    add a subpanel for the additional load of a hot tub.
    Zack, Feb 22, 2005
    #3
  4. Zack

    Matt Guest

    You could hook up an A/B switch to your fuse panel, and if it is in the
    A position it would feed your fuse box, and if in the B position it
    would feed your new panel. You could probably even install 220v outlets
    throughout your house and just plug everything into them.

    - Jeff Wisnia
    Matt, Feb 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Zack

    SQLit Guest

    "Zack" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I just recently bought a house that was made in the 1950's. I would
    > like to add a hot tub to the house (220V). Protection to the house's
    > electrical system is provided by a fuse box - which is full. My
    > question is, how do I add a sub panel to the fuse box assuming that the
    > electrical system can handle the load? I am assuming that I branch the
    > wire directly off (in parallel) of where it comes into the fuse box.



    Call several licensed electrical contractors in your area and get estimates.
    Then you will know if you can add in another subpanel.

    Your concept of ".....assuming that I branch the wire directly off (in
    parallel) of where it comes into the fuse box." Is not a acceptable method.
    If I understand correctly what your doing.

    Others have stated, get a new service. which considering the era of the
    equipment you have is good advice.
    SQLit, Feb 22, 2005
    #5
  6. Zack

    zxcvbob Guest

    Zack wrote:
    > I just recently bought a house that was made in the 1950's. I would
    > like to add a hot tub to the house (220V). Protection to the house's
    > electrical system is provided by a fuse box - which is full. My
    > question is, how do I add a sub panel to the fuse box assuming that the
    > electrical system can handle the load? I am assuming that I branch the
    > wire directly off (in parallel) of where it comes into the fuse box.
    >


    What size main fuses are in your existing fuse box? This should tell
    you what size service wires you have. (I will assume a standard 60A
    Square D fuse box.)

    Do you have an electric range? If not, the cartridge fuse pullout
    labelled "RANGE" can be used to power your hot tub (with proper GFCI
    protection, etc.) or used to power a small subpanel. If the RANGE
    connections are already being used by a water heater, dryer, etc., you
    are kind of out of luck unless your fuse box has feed thru lugs (lets
    you tap in after the MAIN fuses).

    A better solution is to replace the fuse box with a breaker panel -- it
    doesn't have to be 200A. You need to run a load analysis to see how
    much you need (I only needed about 85A when I ran the calculations, but
    opted for a 150A panel instead of a 100A or 125A so I would have enough
    capacity to add a big subpanel later for a workshop.)

    Bob
    zxcvbob, Feb 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Zack

    Zack Guest

    Thanks Bob. I'll check it out.
    Zack, Feb 22, 2005
    #7
  8. Zack

    The Real Tom Guest

    On 22 Feb 2005 08:44:26 -0800, "Zack" <> wrote:

    >I just recently bought a house that was made in the 1950's. I would
    >like to add a hot tub to the house (220V). Protection to the house's
    >electrical system is provided by a fuse box - which is full. My
    >question is, how do I add a sub panel to the fuse box assuming that the
    >electrical system can handle the load? I am assuming that I branch the
    >wire directly off (in parallel) of where it comes into the fuse box.


    imho:

    Do not assume, and do not add any branches or new subpanels till you
    have a service calc done. What is your service panel even rated for?

    later,

    tom @ www.Love-Calculators.com
    The Real Tom, Feb 22, 2005
    #8
  9. Zack

    Mikepier Guest

    There's not much price difference between the 150 and 200 amp service.
    So you might as well get the 200.
    Mikepier, Feb 23, 2005
    #9
  10. Zack

    zxcvbob Guest

    Mikepier wrote:
    > There's not much price difference between the 150 and 200 amp service.
    > So you might as well get the 200.
    >


    But a 150A can be run (with great difficulty) in a 1 1/4 conduit if
    that's what he's got already. (Use 1 1/2 or 2" if you gotta run new
    service conduit anyway)

    And the wire is a lot cheaper for 150A. And the panel is a little bit
    smaller and might be easier to fit in the existing space.

    He needs to do the load calculations and see what size he really needs
    though, then probably go one size larger.

    Best regards,
    Bob
    zxcvbob, Feb 23, 2005
    #10

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