Moving an electric wall socket

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by booveedoo@yahoo.co.uk, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. Guest

    What are the regulations regarding moving an electric wall socket about
    6 inches horizontally from where it is now? I read somewhere this is
    taboo. What is involved...soldered joints etc?
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Gary Cavie <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > > What are the regulations regarding moving an electric wall socket about
    > > 6 inches horizontally from where it is now? I read somewhere this is
    > > taboo. What is involved...soldered joints etc?
    > >

    > If the drop, or rise, of the cables still falls within the boundaries of
    > the socket plate, you're fine. If not, then the cables should either be
    > buried deeper than 50mm into the wall, or given suitabel prtection along
    > their whole length (like heavy gauge steel conduit, rather than the thin
    > steel capping). This is to stop a screw or nail being inserted into the
    > cable at some later date, because nobody had any idea where it was.
    >

    This *isn't* required because the buried cable will be running
    horizontally from a visible fitting (the moved socket).

    You can just chase a channel and bury the cable.


    > If you have to join new lengths of cable on, and the joint will be
    > inaccessible afterwards, the only options permitted are soldering (can be
    > difficult to make a suitable joint, or crimping (using decent crimps, and
    > a ratchet type crimper, rather than the cheapo squeeze together ones sold
    > in car accessory shops). The crimps should then be suitably insulated,
    > ideally by using heat shrink sleeving over each crimp individually, then
    > a second layer covering the whole shebang, making sure that it covers
    > both cable sheaths. Remember to put the HS sleeving on before crimping
    > the joints!


    It might alternatively be possible to put a junction box where the old
    socket was with a cover plate over it so it is accessible. No special
    wiring techniques are then required.


    Strictly, as this is modifying a ring circuit, I suspect it's caught
    by the new Part P regulations so you should call your local building
    inspectors and tell them. I'm sure they'll be really hppy to hear
    from you.

    --
    Chris Green
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    <> wrote:
    > What are the regulations regarding moving an electric wall socket
    > about 6 inches horizontally from where it is now? I read
    > somewhere this is taboo.


    If it isn't it should be. Some pratt leckie in the past
    apparently moved our cooker switch about 12" to the left,
    just with a horizontal cable, leaving the vertical cabling
    in the original place.

    Some kitchen work last year resulted in a nail through
    the vertical cabling.

    > What is involved...soldered joints etc?


    I don't have the bottle to dig out and see how that
    leckie did the join.

    --
    Tony Williams.
     
    Tony Williams, Jan 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Roger Guest

    The message <>
    from contains these words:

    > What are the regulations regarding moving an electric wall socket about
    > 6 inches horizontally from where it is now? I read somewhere this is
    > taboo. What is involved...soldered joints etc?


    If it is a matter of moving it to make it accessable the easy
    alternative is to leave it where it is and spur off another socket
    alongside. If alongside happens to be on the line of the ring cabling
    (unlikely) it is easy enough to add an extra socket to the ring. Adding
    extra sockets means you escape the problems of extending/replacing
    existing cable runs.

    --
    Roger
     
    Roger, Jan 19, 2005
    #4
  5. John Rumm Guest

    wrote:

    >>If the drop, or rise, of the cables still falls within the boundaries of
    >>the socket plate, you're fine. If not, then the cables should either be
    >>buried deeper than 50mm into the wall, or given suitabel prtection along
    >>their whole length (like heavy gauge steel conduit, rather than the thin
    >>steel capping). This is to stop a screw or nail being inserted into the
    >>cable at some later date, because nobody had any idea where it was.
    >>

    >
    > This *isn't* required because the buried cable will be running
    > horizontally from a visible fitting (the moved socket).


    This may on may not be true...

    You can run horizontally *or* vertically from the visible socket plate.
    So if the original wire runs up or down the wall to the socket you can
    move it up or down easily enough. If it runs horizontally to the socket
    then you can move it side to side. However you can't move a socket with
    a vertical cable run horizontally since the bulk of the hidden wire run
    will no longer line up with the socket position.

    One way round this is to simply add another socket in the new position
    and connect it to the existing one. That way the wire runs will line up
    with a socket regardless of the location.

    > Strictly, as this is modifying a ring circuit, I suspect it's caught
    > by the new Part P regulations so you should call your local building
    > inspectors and tell them. I'm sure they'll be really hppy to hear
    > from you.


    This is explicitly excluded from part P since it is a "minor work".


    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
     
    John Rumm, Jan 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Gary Cavie Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Gary Cavie <> wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > > > What are the regulations regarding moving an electric wall socket about
    > > > 6 inches horizontally from where it is now? I read somewhere this is
    > > > taboo. What is involved...soldered joints etc?
    > > >

    > > If the drop, or rise, of the cables still falls within the boundaries of
    > > the socket plate, you're fine. If not, then the cables should either be
    > > buried deeper than 50mm into the wall, or given suitabel prtection along
    > > their whole length (like heavy gauge steel conduit, rather than the thin
    > > steel capping). This is to stop a screw or nail being inserted into the
    > > cable at some later date, because nobody had any idea where it was.
    > >

    > This *isn't* required because the buried cable will be running
    > horizontally from a visible fitting (the moved socket).
    >
    > You can just chase a channel and bury the cable.


    Sorry, my bad wording. I meant the original cables in the wall, dropping
    to the existing socket, and assumed that the original socket was to be
    done away with. In this case, the original cables could be dropping
    outside the permitted zone of the socket, and doing a dog-leg in the
    cable to reach the new socket would not be allowed.

    >
    >
    > > If you have to join new lengths of cable on, and the joint will be
    > > inaccessible afterwards, the only options permitted are soldering (can be
    > > difficult to make a suitable joint, or crimping (using decent crimps, and
    > > a ratchet type crimper, rather than the cheapo squeeze together ones sold
    > > in car accessory shops). The crimps should then be suitably insulated,
    > > ideally by using heat shrink sleeving over each crimp individually, then
    > > a second layer covering the whole shebang, making sure that it covers
    > > both cable sheaths. Remember to put the HS sleeving on before crimping
    > > the joints!

    >
    > It might alternatively be possible to put a junction box where the old
    > socket was with a cover plate over it so it is accessible. No special
    > wiring techniques are then required.


    Again, I assumed that the original socket box was to be filled in and
    plastered over - all my assumptions! I agree that if the original box is
    just to be cover-plated, and ring extended, then it's dead simple. Not
    too sure off the top of my head, whether you can terminate a ring in a
    JB, then spur a single cable out of it? Common sense says that it's no
    different, and possibly even a bit better, than spurring out of a socket
    outlet, but then...

    >
    >
    > Strictly, as this is modifying a ring circuit, I suspect it's caught
    > by the new Part P regulations so you should call your local building
    > inspectors and tell them. I'm sure they'll be really hppy to hear
    > from you.
    >
    >


    Minor works if it's just spurring from the existing, and leaving the
    original in place, unless it's in a kitchen of course!
     
    Gary Cavie, Jan 19, 2005
    #6
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