Mothballing a swimming pool

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by Bryce, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. Bryce

    Bryce Guest

    Neighboring community announced they will not be
    opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to
    operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.

    Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?
    Bryce, Feb 25, 2009
    #1
  2. Bryce

    ransley Guest

    On Feb 25, 4:49 pm, Bryce <> wrote:
    > Neighboring community announced they will not be
    > opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    > to save money.  They say it costs $100,000 to
    > operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    > to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    > Wow.  What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    lost revenue
    ransley, Feb 25, 2009
    #2
  3. Bryce

    Jerry Guest

    On Feb 25, 3:49 pm, Bryce <> wrote:
    > Neighboring community announced they will not be
    > opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    > to save money.  They say it costs $100,000 to
    > operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    > to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    > Wow.  What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    Dunno. If the surrounding soil is expansive, there could be concerns
    with the walls cracking with the pool empty - maybe need to do
    something to brace the walls?

    Jerry
    Jerry, Feb 26, 2009
    #3
  4. Bryce

    gpsman Guest

    On Feb 25, 5:49 pm, Bryce <> wrote:
    > they must spend $50K
    > to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    > Wow.  What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    If it's currently covered and empty of water, nothing.
    -----

    - gpsman
    gpsman, Feb 26, 2009
    #4
  5. Bryce

    aemeijers Guest

    Jerry wrote:
    > On Feb 25, 3:49 pm, Bryce <> wrote:
    >> Neighboring community announced they will not be
    >> opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    >> to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to
    >> operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    >> to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >>
    >> Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?

    >
    > Dunno. If the surrounding soil is expansive, there could be concerns
    > with the walls cracking with the pool empty - maybe need to do
    > something to brace the walls?
    >
    > Jerry

    Like fill it halfway with heavily chlorinated water? Floor heaving is
    more likely than walls cracking, but I'm no engineer.

    (Same concept as why residential sand'n'vinyl pools are never emptied
    all the way...)

    --
    aem sends....
    aemeijers, Feb 26, 2009
    #5
  6. Bryce

    Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 17:49:39 -0500, Bryce <>
    wrote:

    >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    >to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to
    >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    >Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    Maybe you misunderstood or they weren't clear. It may very well be
    that what they meant was that even with the pool emptied and shut
    down, there will still be expenses for insurance, security, general
    maintenance, and other fixed costs that will still need to be paid
    whether it is open for swimming or not.
    , Feb 26, 2009
    #6
  7. Bryce

    aemeijers Guest

    Steve Barker wrote:
    > Bryce wrote:
    >> Neighboring community announced they will not be
    >> opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    >> to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to operate for the season,
    >> but they must spend $50K
    >> to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >>
    >> Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?

    >
    > that's bs. All it takes is a super shocking treatment and a good cover.
    >
    > s

    Residential pool, sure. A municipal pool is what, a quarter of an acre?
    Nobody makes covers that big.

    --
    aem sends....
    aemeijers, Feb 26, 2009
    #7
  8. Bryce

    Bob Guest

    aemeijers wrote:

    > Residential pool, sure. A municipal pool is what, a quarter of an acre?
    > Nobody makes covers that big.


    Floating covers are quite commonplace for municipal pools. They retain
    the heat and reduce evaporation. But the liability issues remain, just
    as they would with an empty pool.
    Bob, Feb 26, 2009
    #8
  9. Bryce

    Oren Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 17:50:22 -0800, Bob <> wrote:

    >But the liability issues remain, just as they would with an empty pool.


    Next to a school, years ago a community pool was drained for repair. A
    local kid died after he dove from the diving board into an empty pool.
    Kids climbed the fence at night for a swim. No lights on.
    Oren, Feb 26, 2009
    #9
  10. Bryce

    Jon Danniken Guest

    "Steve Barker" wrote:
    > you don't drain a pool unless you want massive amounts of trouble and
    > stand a chance of never using it again.


    Aye, they drained one around here a few years ago. Then it rained, raising
    the water table up to the point where it floated the pool a few inches.

    That turned out to be a big mess.

    Jon
    Jon Danniken, Feb 26, 2009
    #10
  11. Bryce

    Smitty Two Guest

    In article <>,
    Steve Barker <> wrote:

    > Jon Danniken wrote:
    > > "Steve Barker" wrote:
    > >> you don't drain a pool unless you want massive amounts of trouble and
    > >> stand a chance of never using it again.

    > >
    > > Aye, they drained one around here a few years ago. Then it rained, raising
    > > the water table up to the point where it floated the pool a few inches.
    > >
    > > That turned out to be a big mess.
    > >
    > > Jon
    > >
    > >

    >
    > exactly, and people say concrete don't float.. LOL!
    >
    > steve


    In shoe form it doesn't. But hell, they make boat hulls out of it.
    Smitty Two, Feb 26, 2009
    #11
  12. Bryce

    Oren Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 20:19:51 -0800, "Jon Danniken"
    <> wrote:

    >"Steve Barker" wrote:
    >> you don't drain a pool unless you want massive amounts of trouble and
    >> stand a chance of never using it again.

    >
    >Aye, they drained one around here a few years ago. Then it rained, raising
    >the water table up to the point where it floated the pool a few inches.
    >
    >That turned out to be a big mess.


    Drained my pool just last year: For what I know it was the first
    time.

    My water table is 385' below the desert and will never cause my pool
    to float.
    Oren, Feb 26, 2009
    #12
  13. Bryce

    Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 17:49:39 -0500, Bryce <>
    wrote:

    >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    >to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to
    >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    >Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    What is needed to mothball a pool varies greatly with the
    design of the pool, the local ground conditions and the local weather
    conditions.
    , Feb 26, 2009
    #13
  14. Bryce

    bob haller Guest

    On Feb 26, 9:38�am, wrote:
    > On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 17:49:39 -0500, Bryce <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    > >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    > >to save money. �They say it costs $100,000 to
    > >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    > >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.

    >
    > >Wow. �What needs to be done to mothball a pool?

    >
    > � � � � What is needed to mothball a poolvaries greatly with the
    > design of the pool, the local ground conditions and the local weather
    > conditions. �


    suggest community fund raising to cover the remaining 50 grand
    difference. and remind them the kids who would of hung out at the pool
    may turn to mischef and crime, from boredom
    bob haller, Feb 26, 2009
    #14
  15. "bob haller" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Feb 26, 9:38?am, wrote:
    > On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 17:49:39 -0500, Bryce <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    > >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    > >to save money. ?They say it costs $100,000 to
    > >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    > >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.

    >
    > >Wow. ?What needs to be done to mothball a pool?

    >
    > ? ? ? ? What is needed to mothball a pool varies greatly with the
    > design of the pool, the local ground conditions and the local weather
    > conditions. ?


    suggest community fund raising to cover the remaining 50 grand
    difference. and remind them the kids who would of hung out at the pool
    may turn to mischef and crime, from boredom


    Leave about eight inches of water in the deep end of the pool and use it
    waterboard the miscreants found guilty.
    Charlie Darwin, Feb 26, 2009
    #15
  16. Bryce

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    In article <go4hu3$fhb$>, Bryce <> wrote:
    >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    >to save money. They say it costs $100,000 to
    >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.
    >
    >Wow. What needs to be done to mothball a pool?


    A sh*tload of mothballs?

    I would guess... security, insurance, maintenance to
    prevent stagnant water accumulation (mosquitos),
    salaries for the (tenured) life guards and more...

    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Malcolm Hoar, Feb 26, 2009
    #16
  17. Bryce

    bob haller Guest

    On Feb 26, 4:50�pm, (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:
    > In article <go4hu3$>, Bryce <> wrote:
    > >Neighboring community announced they will not be
    > >opening their municipal swimming pool this summer
    > >to save money. �They say it costs $100,000 to
    > >operate for the season, but they must spend $50K
    > >to mothball it while it's idle, so only $50K saved.

    >
    > >Wow. �What needs to be done to mothball a pool?

    >
    > A sh*tload of mothballs?
    >
    > I would guess... security, insurance, maintenance to
    > prevent stagnant water accumulation (mosquitos),
    > salaries for the (tenured) life guards and more...
    >
    > --
    > |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    > | Malcolm Hoar � � � � � "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    > | � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Gary Player. |
    > |http://www.malch.com/� � � � � � � Shpx gur PQN. � � � � � � � �|
    > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    keep mostly full of water so it doesnt float and destroy itself, they
    do actually raise right out of the ground. now chlorinate and
    circulate the water so it doesnt get stagnant and buggy, now add lnite
    sec urity lighting, guards, cut grass, maintain buildings, pay utility
    bills.

    its all very costly, espically if you want to use it again.

    if re use isnt part of plan just jackhammer big hole in bottom so
    water cant accumulate, fill the now junk pool with fill ...........

    still need minimal maintence on buildings unless you tear them down,
    and stuff like cutting grass, and security so it doesnt become a
    druggie hangout etc
    bob haller, Feb 27, 2009
    #17
  18. Bryce

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    In article <>, bob haller <> wrote:

    >if re use isnt part of plan just jackhammer big hole in bottom so
    >water cant accumulate, fill the now junk pool with fill ...........


    In some places like California there are very stringent code
    requirements for filling in pools. It's a *very* expensive
    proposition.

    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Malcolm Hoar, Feb 27, 2009
    #18
  19. Bryce

    aemeijers Guest

    Jon Danniken wrote:
    > "Steve Barker" wrote:
    >> you don't drain a pool unless you want massive amounts of trouble and
    >> stand a chance of never using it again.

    >
    > Aye, they drained one around here a few years ago. Then it rained, raising
    > the water table up to the point where it floated the pool a few inches.
    >
    > That turned out to be a big mess.
    >
    > Jon
    >
    >

    Depends on local soil conditions and how the pool was built. Town I grew
    up in had a huge late 1940s outdoor municipal pool, like Olympic size 12
    lane, plus a T with a dive area. They emptied it every year. But the
    concrete was thick and heavily rebarred, and on that end of town, there
    was a thick layer of gravel about 10-12 feet down under everything. (as
    a wee lad, I saw LOTS of basements go in, less than a mile from there.)
    Water table spikes were not a problem around there. A mile the other
    direction, however, they just had a century flood, last summer.

    --
    aem sends...
    aemeijers, Feb 27, 2009
    #19
  20. Bryce

    Bob Guest

    On Feb 25, 7:38 pm, wrote:
    >
    > Maybe you misunderstood or they weren't clear. It may very well be
    > that what they meant was that even with the pool emptied and shut
    > down, there will still be expenses for insurance, security, general
    > maintenance, and other fixed costs that will still need to be paid
    > whether it is open for swimming or not.


    Exactly. Probably $50 to empty it, and $49,950 for insurance in case
    someone falls in.
    Bob, Feb 27, 2009
    #20

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