Mice - how many ?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by phil@philandlaura.com, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Have got mice.

    Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    pile of poison:

    http://www.epinions.com/Woodstream_Victor_Quickset_Mouse_Trap_M130_Pest_Control

    But we have a third - it just eats all the poison - and the trap does
    not go off ! It's really strange - done that four times now, so I guess
    it's very sick..

    The traps (I have four) just do not seem to be sensitive
    enough...though they worked on two.

    How many mice should I expect in a "nest" ????

    Thanks
    , Jan 30, 2006
    #1
  2. Fred Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Have got mice.
    >
    > Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    > pile of poison:
    >
    > http://www.epinions.com/Woodstream_Victor_Quickset_Mouse_Trap_M130_Pest_Control
    >
    > But we have a third - it just eats all the poison - and the trap does
    > not go off ! It's really strange - done that four times now, so I guess
    > it's very sick..
    >
    > The traps (I have four) just do not seem to be sensitive
    > enough...though they worked on two.
    >
    > How many mice should I expect in a "nest" ????
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    Normally quite a few. You probably got the parent and the offspring are
    much smaller so not setting off the trap. You'll have to feed them up until
    they do.
    Fred, Jan 30, 2006
    #2
  3. Rumble Guest

    said the following on 30/01/2006 09:44:
    > Have got mice.
    >
    > Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    > pile of poison:
    >
    > http://www.epinions.com/Woodstream_Victor_Quickset_Mouse_Trap_M130_Pest_Control
    >
    > But we have a third - it just eats all the poison - and the trap does
    > not go off ! It's really strange - done that four times now, so I guess
    > it's very sick..
    >
    > The traps (I have four) just do not seem to be sensitive
    > enough...though they worked on two.
    >
    > How many mice should I expect in a "nest" ????
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    Firstly, you don't need to put poison in springy mouse traps - peanut
    butter or Branston pickle is much cheaper and safer ;-)

    Secondly, where are you putting the bait? Modern designs of trap (such
    as the Victor) allow you to put the bait above the trigger, so that the
    mouse will step on the trigger to reach the bait. This truly draws the
    mouse into the trap rather than allowing the mouse to nibble at the
    edges of the bait.

    Thirdly, where are you putting the traps? Mice like cover and shun open
    spaces, so you should put the traps up against the wall, so that the
    mice would have to go "through" them or "around" them. Hopefully, the
    mouse will choose to go through as this keeps it closer to the wall.

    As to how many mice in a nest, well that depends on how long they've
    been there and what sources/quantities of food are available. It's
    impossible to be any more specific.
    Rumble, Jan 30, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    <> wrote:
    >Have got mice.
    >
    >Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    >pile of poison:
    >
    >http://www.epinions.com/Woodstream_Victor_Quickset_Mouse_Trap_M130_Pest_Control
    >
    >But we have a third - it just eats all the poison - and the trap does
    >not go off ! It's really strange - done that four times now, so I guess
    >it's very sick..


    No need for expensive poison - just good bait. I have used rasins or prunes
    in the past.

    You need to TIE the bait to the release arm with a bit of wire, if you don't,
    they can nibble it away without springing it, so use tiable bait, not a
    paste.

    Gordon
    Gordon Henderson, Jan 30, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    I removed an old back boiler from the fireplace and found a nest in the
    outer chimney wall - at first I thought there was only one mouse, how
    wrong I was...

    Anyway, I got a trap - just one mind you, and spent about 4 quid on it,
    a posh plastic affair, and used chocolate as bait. The little bug**rs
    kept taking the chocolate from the trap without setting it off, that
    trap never caught a single one! I bought some cheapo 50p wooden traps
    and arranged obstacles in front of the fireplace so that they'd have to
    pass over the trap to get out, this got them every time. I used
    chocolate as bait the first couple of times, but then had no more (it
    got eaten!), so I just set the trap without bait. This caught another
    two of them within 24 hours. We had four in total, touch wood we
    haven't seen any more for the last month or so. The way to go seems to
    be to force them to take a specific route. Don't use poison as they'll
    just go off to die somewhere inaccessible, and then stink out the house
    for months to come.

    Phil
    , Jan 30, 2006
    #5
  6. Mark A Guest

    Reading up on it, after I spotted a mouse happily running around the
    living room, it seems the official advice is prevent access as you can't
    fight the buggers, they breed too quickly.

    To that end I fixed fine stainless steel mesh to all my low level air
    bricks and haven't seen any, or any evidence, of 'em since. Remember, if
    you can poke a pencil into something that's big enough for them to get
    through. They can compress their skeletons down to amazingly small
    proportions without ill effect.

    Regards

    Mark
    Mark A, Jan 30, 2006
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    <> wrote:

    > Anyway, I got a trap - just one mind you, and spent about 4 quid
    > on it, a posh plastic affair, and used chocolate as bait. The
    > little bug**rs kept taking the chocolate from the trap without
    > setting it off, that trap never caught a single one!


    A mouse will just crouch there, licking away at the
    chocolate. Eventually one *might* try to lift the
    lump off, and spring the trap, but it doesn't seem
    to happen often.

    A nice oily roasted peanut seems to attract mice
    quite well.

    --
    Tony Williams.
    Tony Williams, Jan 30, 2006
    #7
  8. Henry Guest

    "Tony Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Anyway, I got a trap - just one mind you, and spent about 4 quid
    >> on it, a posh plastic affair, and used chocolate as bait. The
    >> little bug**rs kept taking the chocolate from the trap without
    >> setting it off, that trap never caught a single one!

    >
    > A mouse will just crouch there, licking away at the
    > chocolate. Eventually one *might* try to lift the
    > lump off, and spring the trap, but it doesn't seem
    > to happen often.
    >
    > A nice oily roasted peanut seems to attract mice
    > quite well.
    >
    > --


    I used to us a bit of bread smeared with sunflower spread and dipped in
    sugar as bait for a spring trap. Now I use a humane no-kill trap baited with
    a blob of peanut butter. Usually works within a few hours.

    Henry
    Henry, Jan 30, 2006
    #8
  9. On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 12:32:56 +0000, Tony Hogarty
    <> wrote:


    |Living with them as regular visitors to the house we have largely given up
    |trying to stop them getting in, as you say they can get in amazingly small
    |gaps. They seem to be largely winter visitors here coming in off the
    |fields when it gets too cold for them.
    |
    |I normally find them to be of little nuiscance apart from the time when
    |they proceeded to gnaw the tops off a cupboard full of Tupperware when we
    |were away. That did push my patience a little.

    Well mice are doublley incontinent.
    If you don't mind them peeing and shitting over your food and property,
    also making everywhere stink. that is your problem.

    My house is permanently baited where nothing but a mouse can get.
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Please quote, with quote
    character, previous post sniped to only the bit you are replying to.
    Threads often contain 100s of posts dozens layers deep. Other people
    use different newsreaders, they do not see or do what you see and do.
    Dave Fawthrop, Jan 30, 2006
    #9
  10. On 30 Jan 2006 01:44:48 -0800
    wrote:

    > Have got mice.
    >
    > Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    > pile of poison:
    >
    > http://www.epinions.com/Woodstream_Victor_Quickset_Mouse_Trap_M130_Pest_Control
    >
    > But we have a third - it just eats all the poison - and the trap does
    > not go off ! It's really strange - done that four times now, so I
    > guess it's very sick..
    >
    > The traps (I have four) just do not seem to be sensitive
    > enough...though they worked on two.
    >
    > How many mice should I expect in a "nest" ????
    >
    > Thanks
    >


    At least two, probably more. Also a word on Traps. The so called
    'Humane' traps are the least humane things ever. Unless you can
    guarantee to check them every 2-3 hours any mouse caught in one will
    die in a horrible way. I had one and found the mouse the next morning
    stone dead, drenched in sweat and urine. Never again. A good clean
    kill with an old-fashioned spring trap is the best.

    R.
    Richard A Downing, Jan 30, 2006
    #10
  11. soup Guest

    Henry wrote:
    > Now I use a humane no-kill trap baited with a blob of peanut butter.


    In what way is the use of these traps humane?
    I assume you trap them alive then release them outside your house alive
    --
    This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
    hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
    may be used this is due to my limitations with the English language .
    soup, Jan 30, 2006
    #11
  12. Mark A Guest

    Richard A Downing wrote:
    >
    > At least two, probably more. Also a word on Traps. The so called
    > 'Humane' traps are the least humane things ever. Unless you can
    > guarantee to check them every 2-3 hours any mouse caught in one will
    > die in a horrible way.


    It's what I use/used and the mice have always been perfectly happy the
    following morning to be released. 'Course I made the initial mistake of
    releasing them in the back garden, then across the road, and eventually
    across the other side of the green I live on. Talking to professional
    exterminator he reckoned if you're going to release them make it at
    least half a mile as they will have found their way back to your house
    in under five minutes. I compromised by releasing them somewhere far
    enough away and hopefully more attractive. Not sure my neighbours liked
    that plan though. Thankfully I haven't had to do it in over a year.

    Regards

    Mark
    Mark A, Jan 30, 2006
    #12
  13. Henry Guest

    "Ian Stirling" <> wrote in message
    news:43de1ffc$0$82673$...
    > soup <> wrote:
    >> Henry wrote:
    >>> Now I use a humane no-kill trap baited with a blob of peanut butter.

    >>
    >> In what way is the use of these traps humane?

    >
    > It provides a sustainable, green source of cat toys.


    Indeed of the mice which are brought in by my cats those that are not too
    mashed up get caught in the humane trap and get a second chance to be cat
    prey once again. :)

    Henry
    Henry, Jan 30, 2006
    #13
  14. On 30 Jan 2006 01:44:48 -0800, wrote:

    >Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    >pile of poison:


    Don't use poison, or chocolate.

    Depending on your location, you could be feeding every mouse in a 50m
    radius, so potentially dozens.

    --
    Nigel M
    Nigel Molesworth, Jan 30, 2006
    #14
  15. soup Guest

    Lobster wrote:
    > Yes we have one


    >(released on the other side of town).



    Where they become food for the local predators after all these are mice
    that have been born or adapted to life in the enviroment of inside a
    house not "out in the wild". What is more humane being killed quickly
    or being eaten, possibly still "kicking and screaming"?
    --
    This post contains no hidden meanings, no implications and certainly no
    hidden agendas so it should be taken at face value. The wrong words
    may be used this is due to my limitations with the English language .
    soup, Jan 30, 2006
    #15
  16. On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 18:12:06 GMT, Lobster <>
    wrote:

    |Mark A wrote:
    |> Richard A Downing wrote:
    |>
    |>>At least two, probably more. Also a word on Traps. The so called
    |>>'Humane' traps are the least humane things ever. Unless you can
    |>>guarantee to check them every 2-3 hours any mouse caught in one will
    |>>die in a horrible way.
    |>
    |> It's what I use/used and the mice have always been perfectly happy the
    |> following morning to be released.
    |
    |Yes we have one and I think I've only had one 'fatality' (when
    |admittedly I unfortunately forgot I'd set the trap), versus half a dozen
    |extremely perky live ones (released on the other side of town).

    Where they either went into someone else's house, or got killed by the
    local cats. Not a good idea :-(
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Please quote, with quote
    character, previous post sniped to only the bit you are replying to.
    Threads often contain 100s of posts dozens layers deep. Other people
    use different newsreaders, they do not see or do what you see and do.
    Dave Fawthrop, Jan 30, 2006
    #16
  17. Guest

    I used a small bit of twix with a normal cheapo spring trap. you can
    stick it down by the toffee side so it stays in place. true they cna
    lick the chocolate off but they then have to be bit more active to get
    at the biscuit and this sets them off. worked every time for me, once
    within 20 minutes of setting it in the loft.



    Nigel Molesworth wrote:
    > On 30 Jan 2006 01:44:48 -0800, wrote:
    >
    > >Killed two in traps (the sprung "splat" variety) baited with a large
    > >pile of poison:

    >
    > Don't use poison, or chocolate.
    >
    > Depending on your location, you could be feeding every mouse in a 50m
    > radius, so potentially dozens.
    >
    > --
    > Nigel M
    , Jan 30, 2006
    #17
  18. Mary Fisher Guest

    "Henry" <Henryaintgonnatell.sunnysideup.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > I used to us a bit of bread smeared with sunflower spread and dipped in
    > sugar as bait for a spring trap. Now I use a humane no-kill trap baited
    > with a blob of peanut butter. Usually works within a few hours.


    And what do you do with the living mice you trap?

    Mary
    >
    > Henry
    >
    Mary Fisher, Jan 30, 2006
    #18
  19. Henry Guest

    "Mary Fisher" <> wrote in message
    news:43de715b$0$825$...
    >
    > "Henry" <Henryaintgonnatell.sunnysideup.com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >>
    >> I used to us a bit of bread smeared with sunflower spread and dipped in
    >> sugar as bait for a spring trap. Now I use a humane no-kill trap baited
    >> with a blob of peanut butter. Usually works within a few hours.

    >
    > And what do you do with the living mice you trap?
    >
    > Mary
    >>
    >> Henry
    >>

    >

    As I said in my previous post I put them out to be caught again.

    Henry
    Henry, Jan 30, 2006
    #19
  20. Grant Guest

    "" wrote in message
    news:
    >
    > How many mice should I expect in a "nest" ????


    Obviously, it depends but I took out 5 in 48 hours with 2 classic wooden
    traps and chocolate. Not seen evidence of any since.
    Grant, Jan 30, 2006
    #20

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