Lubricant for Glass Sliding door tracks ?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by James, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. James

    James Guest

    What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have tried
    a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.

    WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.

    Any good ideas ?

    Thank you !!


    James
    James, Jun 13, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. James

    Guest

    On Jun 12, 4:06 pm, "James" <> wrote:
    > What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    > something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    > attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have tried
    > a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >
    > WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >
    > Any good ideas ?
    >
    > Thank you !!
    >
    > James


    I haven't tried it, but what about graphite. Seems <logically> that it
    would be OK....
    , Jun 13, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. James

    C & E Guest

    "Rich" <> wrote in message
    news:466ef08b$0$19720$...
    > James wrote:
    >> What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I
    >> need something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks,
    >> without attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself.
    >> I have tried a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >>
    >> WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >>
    >> Any good ideas ?
    >>
    >> Thank you !!
    >>
    >>
    >> James

    >
    > Lubricating the tracks is like oiling the skating rink hoping for longer
    > coast times. You need to oil the bearing that are riding on the tracks.
    >
    > Rich
    >


    Sounds good. How do you get to them? Aerosol?
    C & E, Jun 13, 2007
    #3
  4. James

    Tony Hwang Guest

    C & E wrote:

    > "Rich" <> wrote in message
    > news:466ef08b$0$19720$...
    >
    >>James wrote:
    >>
    >>>What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I
    >>>need something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks,
    >>>without attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself.
    >>>I have tried a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >>>
    >>>WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >>>
    >>>Any good ideas ?
    >>>
    >>>Thank you !!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>James

    >>
    >>Lubricating the tracks is like oiling the skating rink hoping for longer
    >>coast times. You need to oil the bearing that are riding on the tracks.
    >>
    >>Rich
    >>

    >
    >
    > Sounds good. How do you get to them? Aerosol?
    >
    >

    Hi,
    I wonder why people think WD-40 is lubricant? It's a cleaning solvent.
    I'd try little bit of white grease(Luriplate) or squirt of liquid wrench
    (Teflon).
    Tony Hwang, Jun 13, 2007
    #4
  5. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Jun 12, 4:06 pm, "James" <> wrote:
    >> What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    >> something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    >> attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have
    >> tried
    >> a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.



    >
    > I haven't tried it, but what about graphite. Seems <logically> that it
    > would be OK....
    >


    Graphite will make a gunky mess. Any lubricant is the wrong approach. The
    door needs to be fixed properly meaning it must be removed from the track
    the rollers replaced. It should be done soon as more wear can ruin the
    track completely.
    Edwin Pawlowski, Jun 13, 2007
    #5
  6. James

    James Guest

    Thanks for all the ideas. I have in fact tried liquid wrench, but it
    wears off after a week or two.

    I have not yet tried graphite, and had not thought of it. I think that I
    will give that a try. I wonder if the powder or liquid graphite would do
    best ?


    Keep the comments coming !!

    James
    James, Jun 13, 2007
    #6
  7. James

    Guest

    On Jun 12, 7:04 pm, "James" <> wrote:
    > Thanks for all the ideas. I have in fact tried liquid wrench, but it
    > wears off after a week or two.
    >
    > I have not yet tried graphite, and had not thought of it. I think that I
    > will give that a try. I wonder if the powder or liquid graphite would do
    > best ?
    >
    > Keep the comments coming !!
    >
    > James


    I've used powdered graphite on a couple of similar things. I got a 12
    ounce squeeze bottle at the local True Value. Pretty cheap as I
    remember. Don't know why a previous poster mentioned that it would
    make a goopy mess. It's dry. Unless your door is really exposed to the
    weather, the graphite should stay dry too....
    , Jun 13, 2007
    #7
  8. James

    mm Guest

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 19:06:22 -0400, "James" <>
    wrote:

    >What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need


    If the door is scraping the track, you may be able to just raise it up
    higher by adjusting the rollers. There's a hidden screw in the hole
    at the bottom at aach end. CW is up, iirc.

    >something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    >attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have tried
    >a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >
    >WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >
    >Any good ideas ?
    >
    >Thank you !!
    >
    >
    >James
    >
    mm, Jun 13, 2007
    #8
  9. James

    Nate Nagel Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>On Jun 12, 4:06 pm, "James" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    >>>something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    >>>attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have
    >>>tried
    >>>a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.

    >
    >
    >
    >>I haven't tried it, but what about graphite. Seems <logically> that it
    >>would be OK....
    >>

    >
    >
    > Graphite will make a gunky mess. Any lubricant is the wrong approach. The
    > door needs to be fixed properly meaning it must be removed from the track
    > the rollers replaced. It should be done soon as more wear can ruin the
    > track completely.
    >


    My parents had a sliding glass door at their house - when they bought
    the house it was in really bad shape and would barely slide. The
    eventual fix was not only replacement of any suspect rollers but
    renewing the lower track. Somewhere my dad found a stainless U-channel
    for just this purpose, it would snap over the existing track and provide
    a new, smooth (and harder than the original aluminum) surface for the
    rollers to ride on. The original track was so badly worn that we had to
    fill the stainless U-channel with something - I don't remember what, but
    possibly silicone? - to make up the difference in areas where the
    rollers actually rode. Worked beautifully with no maintenance until
    maybe 10-15 years later when they decided to replace the sliding door
    with new french doors.

    nate


    --
    replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
    Nate Nagel, Jun 13, 2007
    #9
  10. James

    mm Guest

    On Wed, 13 Jun 2007 01:40:14 GMT, Tony Hwang <> wrote:

    >
    >I wonder why people think WD-40 is lubricant? It's a cleaning solvent.
    >I'd try little bit of white grease(Luriplate) or squirt of liquid wrench
    >(Teflon).


    Liquid wrench is made with teflon? Are you sure?
    mm, Jun 13, 2007
    #10
  11. James

    Noozer Guest

    "mm" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 13 Jun 2007 01:40:14 GMT, Tony Hwang <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I wonder why people think WD-40 is lubricant? It's a cleaning solvent.
    >>I'd try little bit of white grease(Luriplate) or squirt of liquid wrench
    >>(Teflon).

    >
    > Liquid wrench is made with teflon? Are you sure?


    They make a version with a hint of teflon... It's all just marketing hype
    though.

    It's still not a lubricant.
    Noozer, Jun 13, 2007
    #11
  12. James

    Dan Deckert Guest

    Silicon Spray. It doesn't attract dirt and has no chemical residue. Much the
    same as powdered graphite. & on that note, make sure your door rollers are
    properly adjusted. #1 cause of hanging sliders. #2 is dirt/foreign objects
    in the tracks. Never ever use oil based products, such as WD-40. They
    attract & HOLD dirt particles.

    Dan


    "James" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    > something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    > attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have

    tried
    > a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >
    > WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >
    > Any good ideas ?
    >
    > Thank you !!
    >
    >
    > James
    >
    >
    Dan Deckert, Jun 13, 2007
    #12
  13. <> wrote in message
    >
    > I've used powdered graphite on a couple of similar things. I got a 12
    > ounce squeeze bottle at the local True Value. Pretty cheap as I
    > remember. Don't know why a previous poster mentioned that it would
    > make a goopy mess. It's dry. Unless your door is really exposed to the
    > weather, the graphite should stay dry too....
    >


    Sorry, what was I thinking. A door exposed to weather? How silly of me.
    (head hanging with shame)

    Besides, that graphite will add a nice sheen to the floors as it gets
    tracked in.
    Edwin Pawlowski, Jun 13, 2007
    #13
  14. James

    Guest

    On Jun 12, 7:00 pm, "Edwin Pawlowski" <> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > > I've used powdered graphite on a couple of similar things. I got a 12
    > > ounce squeeze bottle at the local True Value. Pretty cheap as I
    > > remember. Don't know why a previous poster mentioned that it would
    > > make a goopy mess. It's dry. Unless your door is really exposed to the
    > > weather, the graphite should stay dry too....

    >
    > Sorry, what was I thinking. A door exposed to weather? How silly of me.
    > (head hanging with shame)
    >
    > Besides, that graphite will add a nice sheen to the floors as it gets
    > tracked in.


    YMMV, but all my silders are under a VERY big "eve," I know I spelled
    that wrong/. Anyway, they get no moisture, really, and I am in
    Oregon's Rain Forest. Again, as I say, it may be different for you,
    that's why i made my disclaimer, but in this area all exterior doors
    in any quality built place are quite protected....
    , Jun 13, 2007
    #14
  15. James

    Eric9822 Guest

    On Jun 12, 4:06 pm, "James" <> wrote:
    > What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    > something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    > attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have tried
    > a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >
    > WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >
    > Any good ideas ?
    >
    > Thank you !!
    >
    > James


    As some other posters have stated, lubricating the track is a band-aid
    approach and should be avoided. The rollers need to be replaced and/
    or lubricated. Personally I would replace them since the work to
    access them for lubrication is the same as accessing them for
    replacement. There should be an adjustment at the end of the slider
    near the rollers. Adjust the rollers to retract them in so the slider
    can be removed from the frame. Once the slider is out remove and
    replace or lubricate the rollers. Applying lubricants to the tracks
    will just attract more dust and debris which will create gunk that
    makes the situation worse. Have fun.
    Eric9822, Jun 13, 2007
    #15
  16. James

    willshak Guest

    on 6/12/2007 9:40 PM Tony Hwang said the following:
    > C & E wrote:
    >
    >> "Rich" <> wrote in message
    >> news:466ef08b$0$19720$...
    >>
    >>> James wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I
    >>>> need something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks,
    >>>> without attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself.
    >>>> I have tried a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >>>>
    >>>> WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any good ideas ?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you !!
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> James
    >>>
    >>> Lubricating the tracks is like oiling the skating rink hoping for
    >>> longer coast times. You need to oil the bearing that are riding on
    >>> the tracks.
    >>>
    >>> Rich
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Sounds good. How do you get to them? Aerosol?
    >>

    > Hi,
    > I wonder why people think WD-40 is lubricant? It's a cleaning solvent.
    > I'd try little bit of white grease(Luriplate) or squirt of liquid wrench
    > (Teflon).


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

    --

    Bill
    In Hamptonburgh, NY
    To email, remove the double zeroes after @
    willshak, Jun 13, 2007
    #16
  17. James

    AZ Nomad Guest

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 19:57:20 -0700, Dan Deckert <> wrote:


    >Silicon Spray. It doesn't attract dirt and has no chemical residue. Much the

    The problem is that an application is only good for a couple of weeks.
    AZ Nomad, Jun 13, 2007
    #17
  18. James

    PeterD Guest

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 19:06:22 -0400, "James" <>
    wrote:

    >What is a good lubricant for glass sliding door tracks? I suppose I need
    >something that will lube the tracks for at least a few weeks, without
    >attracting too much dirt and grime to the lubricant itself. I have tried
    >a soap bar which works well, but only for a week or so.
    >
    >WD40 works intitially, but doesn't last, and attracts dirt.
    >
    >Any good ideas ?
    >
    >Thank you !!
    >
    >
    >James
    >


    Go to a bike shop and ask for a bottle of 'White Lightning'... Use it.
    PeterD, Jun 13, 2007
    #18
  19. James

    Mike Guest

    "Noozer" <> wrote in message
    news:%WIbi.18782$xq1.6761@pd7urf1no...
    >
    > "mm" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 13 Jun 2007 01:40:14 GMT, Tony Hwang <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>I wonder why people think WD-40 is lubricant? It's a cleaning solvent.
    >>>I'd try little bit of white grease(Luriplate) or squirt of liquid wrench
    >>>(Teflon).

    >>
    >> Liquid wrench is made with teflon? Are you sure?

    >
    > They make a version with a hint of teflon... It's all just marketing hype
    > though.
    >
    > It's still not a lubricant.
    >

    Yes it is: http://www.gunk.ca/prodsht-en/l212c.pdf
    Mike, Jun 13, 2007
    #19
  20. James

    Mike Guest

    Silicone is NOT silicon.
    "Richard J Kinch" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns994E11DF2B4BFsomeconundrum@216.196.97.131...
    > Dan Deckert writes:
    >
    >> Really? An OIL?

    >
    > Surely you're not that dumb.
    >
    >> Then how do you describe/ascribe to the following?
    >> Well that's certainly strange, even CRC doesn't list their silicone
    >> spray @ 99% mineral spirits & other hydrocarbon stuff.

    >
    > Did you actually read that MSDS? Sez 90 percent petroleum hydrocarbons.
    >
    > Thank you for demonstrating my point.
    Mike, Jun 13, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. jay
    Replies:
    25
    Views:
    793
  2. blueman
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    359
    James \Cubby\ Culbertson
    Mar 25, 2005
  3. Godfrey Muganda

    Replacing glass in sliding glass door

    Godfrey Muganda, Jul 8, 2006, in forum: Misc DIY
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    459
    Godfrey Muganda
    Jul 9, 2006
  4. Miguel
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    932
    Lobster
    Jul 22, 2009
  5. James

    Lubricant for Glass Sliding door tracks ?

    James, Jun 13, 2007, in forum: Building Construction
    Replies:
    31
    Views:
    1,186
    Dan Deckert
    Jun 15, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page