Looking for jackable wheelstands for car

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by MM, Jul 16, 2011.

  1. MM

    MM Guest

    I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something. Any ideas
    what to Google for? I tried a few terms, but Google just floods me
    with everything under the sun (as per usual).

    By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    wheelstands should be safer.)

    MM
    MM, Jul 16, 2011
    #1
  2. MM

    Newshound Guest

    On 16/07/2011 19:23, MM wrote:
    > I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    > there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    > then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something. Any ideas
    > what to Google for? I tried a few terms, but Google just floods me
    > with everything under the sun (as per usual).
    >
    > By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    > could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    > modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    > wheelstands should be safer.)
    >
    > MM


    Ramps are OK. If you are nervous, get a pair of the longer shallow angle
    ones intended for sports cars. That said, a proper garage lift is on my
    lottery list, together with the swimming pool...
    Newshound, Jul 16, 2011
    #2
  3. MM

    Steve Firth Guest

    MM <> wrote:

    > I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands s


    You still seem to be running away from answering the question of how
    manyu children you have brought up. Surely an expert on childcare would
    remember how many children they have?
    Steve Firth, Jul 17, 2011
    #3
  4. MM

    Alan Guest

    In message <>, Trigger
    <> wrote


    >http://www.car-lift-cn.com/car-scissor-lift.html


    Even someone without engineering knowledge can see that the legs will be
    the first bit to collapse on that design, especially as a medium size
    car is circa 1200 Kg and the car lift is rated at 350Kg (static load?)

    It's not something that I would use to work UNDER a car.


    --
    Alan
    news2009 {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
    Alan, Jul 17, 2011
    #4
  5. MM

    Bob Minchin Guest

    Steve Firth wrote:
    > MM<> wrote:
    >
    >> I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands s

    >
    > You still seem to be running away from answering the question of how
    > manyu children you have brought up. Surely an expert on childcare would
    > remember how many children they have?

    FFS give it rest Firth!
    Bob Minchin, Jul 17, 2011
    #5
  6. MM

    Steve Walker Guest

    On 17/07/2011 07:23, Alan wrote:
    > In message <>, Trigger
    > <> wrote
    >
    >
    >> http://www.car-lift-cn.com/car-scissor-lift.html

    >
    > Even someone without engineering knowledge can see that the legs will be
    > the first bit to collapse on that design, especially as a medium size
    > car is circa 1200 Kg and the car lift is rated at 350Kg (static load?)


    By the length and width, you'd be using two or four of these at a time.

    Four at a time and each will be seeing only 1/4 of the total weight -
    ignoring any weight differential between front and rear of the vehicle.

    Two at a time, and it'll probably less, as lifting one end (or even one
    side) of the car will transfer weight to the grounded end/side.

    > It's not something that I would use to work UNDER a car.


    No. I'd not want to use them either, they just don't look right do they?
    Although they are presumably designed and tested to well over the rated
    load.

    SteveW
    Steve Walker, Jul 17, 2011
    #6
  7. On Sun, 17 Jul 2011 07:23:14 +0100, Alan wrote:

    > >http://www.car-lift-cn.com/car-scissor-lift.html

    >
    > Even someone without engineering knowledge can see that the legs will be
    > the first bit to collapse on that design, especially as a medium size
    > car is circa 1200 Kg and the car lift is rated at 350Kg (static load?)


    But each wheel won't have 1200kg on it just a fraction but I agree
    the legs do look like bits of pressed steel. It will also need a
    smooth surface for the legs to rest on as they will need to come
    together as the lift rises and it appears to be pneumatic rather than
    hydraulic.

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
    Dave Liquorice, Jul 17, 2011
    #7
  8. MM

    Huge Guest

    On 2011-07-16, Newshound <> wrote:

    > Ramps are OK. If you are nervous, get a pair of the longer shallow angle
    > ones intended for sports cars. That said, a proper garage lift is on my
    > lottery list,


    Have a look on eBay - they aren't that expensive. The real pain is that they
    usually have 3 phase motors.

    --
    Today is Pungenday, the 52nd day of Confusion in the YOLD 3177
    Sing, for song drives away the wolves.
    Huge, Jul 17, 2011
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    MM <> wrote:
    > I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    > there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    > then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something. Any ideas
    > what to Google for? I tried a few terms, but Google just floods me
    > with everything under the sun (as per usual).


    Well, you're still going to have to drive onto those - so what's the
    difference? They'd also by nature be heavier than a fixed type - and
    decent fixed types are already quite heavy/bulky. If you don't like
    driving up the steep slope, ones with a more gradual one can be found.
    If the problem is the car pushing them along, fix some rubber matting to
    the bottom.

    > By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    > could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    > modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    > wheelstands should be safer.)


    Generally anywhere near a suspension mount will be strong enough to take
    the weight. Use some decent wood to protect things.

    --
    *If you think this van is dirty, you should try having sex with the driver*

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Jul 17, 2011
    #9
  10. MM

    Adrian C Guest

    On 16/07/2011 22:23, Newshound wrote:

    > Ramps are OK. If you are nervous, get a pair of the longer shallow angle
    > ones intended for sports cars. That said, a proper garage lift is on my
    > lottery list, together with the swimming pool...


    Visions of a car parked and floating haphazardly (air beds?) in the
    middle of a swimming pool have swum into my head, dunno why...

    '
    '
    '

    Ah, has me alarm clock gone off yet?

    --
    Adrian C
    Adrian C, Jul 17, 2011
    #10
  11. Alan pretended :
    > In message <>, Trigger
    > <> wrote
    >
    >
    >>http://www.car-lift-cn.com/car-scissor-lift.html

    >
    > Even someone without engineering knowledge can see that the legs will be the
    > first bit to collapse on that design, especially as a medium size car is
    > circa 1200 Kg and the car lift is rated at 350Kg (static load?)
    >
    > It's not something that I would use to work UNDER a car.


    I think that lift, is intended to be a motorbike lift. It only shows
    one, which would just lift one side of a car.

    --
    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (L)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
    Harry Bloomfield, Jul 17, 2011
    #11
  12. MM

    Alan Guest

    In message <>, Harry
    Bloomfield <> wrote

    >I think that lift, is intended to be a motorbike lift.


    And that's why its described as a car scissor lift :)

    --
    Alan
    news2009 {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
    Alan, Jul 17, 2011
    #12
  13. MM

    Guest

    On Sun, 17 Jul 2011 10:37:54 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > MM <> wrote:
    >> I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    >> there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    >> then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something.


    >Well, you're still going to have to drive onto those - so what's the
    >difference?


    >> By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    >> could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    >> modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    >> wheelstands should be safer.)

    >
    >Generally anywhere near a suspension mount will be strong enough to take
    >the weight. Use some decent wood to protect things.


    Sods law could kick in as well, When you find the job you need to do
    is easier or requires the wheels/hubs etc off then you still have to
    support elsewhere anyway.

    G.Harman
    , Jul 17, 2011
    #13
  14. MM

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Jul 16, 7:23 pm, MM <> wrote:
    > I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands


    I generally winch mine up with a horizontal cable winch or Tirfor,
    rather than driving up. It's slower, easier to control, and certainly
    much easier if you're working on your own.
    Andy Dingley, Jul 17, 2011
    #14
  15. It happens that Alan formulated :
    > In message <>, Harry
    > Bloomfield <> wrote
    >
    >>I think that lift, is intended to be a motorbike lift.

    >
    > And that's why its described as a car scissor lift :)


    Well it is a Chinese web site and we all know what Chinese instruction
    leaflets are like, when translated lol

    --
    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (L)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
    Harry Bloomfield, Jul 17, 2011
    #15
  16. MM

    Steve Firth Guest

    Bob Minchin <> wrote:

    > FFS give it rest Firth!


    FFuck off!
    Steve Firth, Jul 17, 2011
    #16
  17. Trigger was thinking very hard :
    > "Harry Bloomfield" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> It happens that Alan formulated :
    >>> In message <>, Harry
    >>> Bloomfield <> wrote
    >>>
    >>>>I think that lift, is intended to be a motorbike lift.
    >>>
    >>> And that's why its described as a car scissor lift :)

    >>
    >> Well it is a Chinese web site and we all know what Chinese instruction
    >> leaflets are like, when translated lol
    >>

    > I don't like the Chinese; not after what they done to Pearl Harbour.


    I think that may have been the Japanese.

    --
    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (L)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk
    Harry Bloomfield, Jul 17, 2011
    #17
  18. MM

    MM Guest

    On Sat, 16 Jul 2011 22:23:00 +0100, Newshound
    <> wrote:

    >On 16/07/2011 19:23, MM wrote:
    >> I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    >> there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    >> then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something. Any ideas
    >> what to Google for? I tried a few terms, but Google just floods me
    >> with everything under the sun (as per usual).
    >>
    >> By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    >> could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    >> modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    >> wheelstands should be safer.)
    >>
    >> MM

    >
    >Ramps are OK. If you are nervous, get a pair of the longer shallow angle
    >ones intended for sports cars. That said, a proper garage lift is on my
    >lottery list, together with the swimming pool...


    In a previous house I had the luxury of a pit. Does one need planning
    permission to dig one in the garage? Would it upset the 'balance' of
    the house foundations?

    MM
    MM, Jul 17, 2011
    #18
  19. MM

    MM Guest

    MM, Jul 17, 2011
    #19
  20. MM

    Newshound Guest

    On 17/07/2011 21:39, MM wrote:
    > On Sat, 16 Jul 2011 22:23:00 +0100, Newshound
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 16/07/2011 19:23, MM wrote:
    >>> I don't fancy driving the car onto fixed wheelstands so I wondered if
    >>> there are scissor types available where you drive the car over them,
    >>> then jack them up and insert a safety bolt or something. Any ideas
    >>> what to Google for? I tried a few terms, but Google just floods me
    >>> with everything under the sun (as per usual).
    >>>
    >>> By the way, I only need these for the back of the car. (Yes, I know I
    >>> could jack the car up normally, then put axle stands underneath, but
    >>> modern cars often don't have anywhere safe to place the stands, hence
    >>> wheelstands should be safer.)
    >>>
    >>> MM

    >>
    >> Ramps are OK. If you are nervous, get a pair of the longer shallow angle
    >> ones intended for sports cars. That said, a proper garage lift is on my
    >> lottery list, together with the swimming pool...

    >
    > In a previous house I had the luxury of a pit. Does one need planning
    > permission to dig one in the garage? Would it upset the 'balance' of
    > the house foundations?
    >
    > MM

    A mate of mine dug one, years ago, and three of us spent a lot of time
    in there. This was a garage at the bottom of the garden (1970 estate in
    Yate) so well away from house footings. The biggest single problem was
    the amount of ground water which seeped in. He subsequently lined it
    with some sort of rubber tanking compound which kept a lot of it out,
    but we still needed to pump out the sump every time we used it.
    Newshound, Jul 17, 2011
    #20

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