Is it ok to use tongue and groove walls for a bathroom?

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by Eric, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. Eric

    Eric Guest

    We are gutting our very dated and less than functional 50's era
    bathroom. The top contender for replacing the green tile is beaded
    tongue and groove (pine). I had originally looked at the panels and
    found that I can buy the actual tongue and groove boards for less
    money and I think it will look better and be easier to install around
    pipes and other obstacles. We are going for 4' coverage around the
    room, with tile in the shower area.

    We plan to paint it white and I was considering that it should be
    primed on front and back prior to installing it (perhaps with exterior
    grade oil paint) and then a final coat of latex (also exterior grade
    paint?)...

    So our one concern is with moisture in the bathroom. Will this cause
    us problems using painted wood like this? Any advice is appreciated.
    Will this work with no side effects? Any thoughts on what kind of
    paint will be the best option? I've heard that it is fine, but others
    have said that it could mold, warp, shift, etc.

    Thanks,
    Eric
    Eric, Oct 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Eric

    Jeff Guest

    Beadboard wainscoting is a traditional bathroom wall treatment found in many
    turn of the century homes. I'd say it has passed the test of time. Moisture
    will only be a problem if the bathroom is not well vented. Be sure to
    install and use a vent fan even if the bathroom has a window, as bathroom
    windows are rarely opened for ventilation.


    "Eric" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We are gutting our very dated and less than functional 50's era
    > bathroom. The top contender for replacing the green tile is beaded
    > tongue and groove (pine). I had originally looked at the panels and
    > found that I can buy the actual tongue and groove boards for less
    > money and I think it will look better and be easier to install around
    > pipes and other obstacles. We are going for 4' coverage around the
    > room, with tile in the shower area.
    >
    > We plan to paint it white and I was considering that it should be
    > primed on front and back prior to installing it (perhaps with exterior
    > grade oil paint) and then a final coat of latex (also exterior grade
    > paint?)...
    >
    > So our one concern is with moisture in the bathroom. Will this cause
    > us problems using painted wood like this? Any advice is appreciated.
    > Will this work with no side effects? Any thoughts on what kind of
    > paint will be the best option? I've heard that it is fine, but others
    > have said that it could mold, warp, shift, etc.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eric
    Jeff, Oct 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. > We plan to paint it white and I was considering that it should be
    > primed on front and back prior to installing it (perhaps with exterior
    > grade oil paint) and then a final coat of latex (also exterior grade
    > paint?)...
    >
    > So our one concern is with moisture in the bathroom. Will this cause
    > us problems using painted wood like this? Any advice is appreciated.
    > Will this work with no side effects? Any thoughts on what kind of
    > paint will be the best option? I've heard that it is fine, but others
    > have said that it could mold, warp, shift, etc.


    If you use an oil-based primer on both sides of the panels, it should
    prevent warping and cupping. You don't need exterior. You should make sure
    that the latex top-coat has mildew prevention additives, but I think most
    do. B. Moore and others have latex paint specially formulated for
    kitchens/bathes.
    Buck Turgidson, Oct 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Eric

    CWatters Guest

    "Buck Turgidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > We plan to paint it white and I was considering that it should be
    > > primed on front and back prior to installing it (perhaps with exterior
    > > grade oil paint) and then a final coat of latex (also exterior grade
    > > paint?)...
    > >
    > > So our one concern is with moisture in the bathroom. Will this cause
    > > us problems using painted wood like this? Any advice is appreciated.
    > > Will this work with no side effects? Any thoughts on what kind of
    > > paint will be the best option? I've heard that it is fine, but others
    > > have said that it could mold, warp, shift, etc.

    >
    > If you use an oil-based primer on both sides of the panels, it should
    > prevent warping and cupping. You don't need exterior. You should make

    sure
    > that the latex top-coat has mildew prevention additives, but I think most
    > do. B. Moore and others have latex paint specially formulated for
    > kitchens/bathes.


    If it's pine watch out for the knots - sometimes they continue to bleed
    after painting. If possible discard any strips with big weepy knots or use
    them where they won't show.
    CWatters, Oct 10, 2004
    #4
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