Iron on carpet.

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by jerrybuilt, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. jerrybuilt

    jerrybuilt Guest

    Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.

    Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    sand a maximum depth.

    Anyone any ideas?

    be !
    Shop all amazing products and get our special offers!
     
    jerrybuilt, Oct 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. jerrybuilt

    David Hearn Guest

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?


    A sanding disk is likely to heat up/melt the carpet again.

    No chance of moving the furniture?

    D
     
    David Hearn, Oct 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. jerrybuilt

    Jon Guest

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?
    >
    > be !
    > Shop all amazing products and get our special offers!

    Cut an irregular shape around the patch and then move a bed / sofa /
    bookcase and cut the same shape out from underneath the object and swap over
    the bits. It does work, but depends on the differential between the wear on
    the two bits of carpet.
    Apart from that, a lawnmower on a very low setting and do the entire
    carpet....
    Jon
     
    Jon, Oct 29, 2003
    #3
  4. jerrybuilt

    Steve Harper Guest

    Claim on the house insurance for a new carpet?

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?
    >
    > be !
    > Shop all amazing products and get our special offers!
     
    Steve Harper, Oct 29, 2003
    #4
  5. jerrybuilt

    Angela Guest

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?


    Why not just claim on your insurance and get a new one?

    Angela
     
    Angela, Oct 29, 2003
    #5
  6. jerrybuilt

    David Hearn Guest

    "Angela" <> wrote in message
    news:bnordm$e58$...
    >
    > "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    > >
    > > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > > sand a maximum depth.
    > >
    > > Anyone any ideas?

    >
    > Why not just claim on your insurance and get a new one?


    Well, firstly requires accidental damage cover.

    Then there's the issue of whether the Contents insurer claims its not
    covered by contents and would be covered by Buildings Insurance, who then
    say that its actually a contents... ;)

    Depending on the excess of the policy, it may not be worthwhile to claim,
    considing the likely increase in premiums, and if he could find an easy way
    of making good without calling in the insurers.

    Ultimately, all claims get covered by other people's premiums, so if
    everyone made unecessary claims we'd all lose out.

    But yes, I think in the end, if the damage is bad, accidental damage cover
    is in place and its worthwhile, then a claim may well be appropriate.

    D
     
    David Hearn, Oct 29, 2003
    #6
  7. jerrybuilt

    RichardS Guest

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?
    >


    Can you have a go at it with a nice clean wire brush? I've done similar
    things in the past and it certainly helps to recreate the pile somehow and
    separates out any tops of the fibres that may have been fused together.

    Not much you can do about the difference in length of fibres except perhaps
    try and reduce the contrast with the surrounding carpet, perhaps using an
    electric razor or a decent beard trimmer?

    cheers
    Richard

    --
    Richard Sampson

    email me at
    richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
     
    RichardS, Oct 29, 2003
    #7
  8. jerrybuilt

    Martin Guest

    "jerrybuilt" <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    > has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    > very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    > that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >
    > Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    > thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    > reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    > a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    > sand a maximum depth.
    >
    > Anyone any ideas?
    >
    > be !
    > Shop all amazing products and get our special offers!


    I did that to a wool carpet 8-10 years back, just left it, after about a
    year of wear you couldn't see it any more.
    Coarse sandpaper or a wire brush in the pile direction may help to separate
    the fibres and hide it, depends on the pile depth.
     
    Martin, Oct 29, 2003
    #8
  9. jerrybuilt

    geoff Guest

    In message <>, jerrybuilt
    <Use-Author-Address-Header@[127.1]> writes
    >Some person has put down a hot iron on a plastic carpet. This
    >has caused a melted patch on the surface. The "crust" is not
    >very thick, and the melting not severe, 'though obvious. I guess
    >that the fibres have been shortened by 0 to two millimetres.
    >Is there a way of camoflaging this iron-shaped mark? I was
    >thinking of cutting the "cap" off with a very sharp knife, to
    >reveal the un-melted surface underneath, or perhaps trying
    >a sanding disk applied gently, perhaps using a frame to
    >sand a maximum depth.
    >Anyone any ideas?


    A rug ?

    >be !


    Hmm, don't seem to be able to read Thai anymore ... oh well



    --
    geoff
     
    geoff, Oct 29, 2003
    #9
  10. jerrybuilt

    John Rumm Guest

    jerrybuilt wrote:

    > Anyone any ideas?


    Iron the rest of the carpet to match ;-)


    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
     
    John Rumm, Oct 29, 2003
    #10
  11. jerrybuilt

    R W Guest

    When one is reading perfectly legitimate comments and suggestions, then
    one comes across

    Jon wrote:


    > Apart from that, a lawnmower on a very low setting and do the entire
    > carpet....



    is when one needs a new monitor due to laugh induced beverage damage.
     
    R W, Oct 30, 2003
    #11
  12. jerrybuilt

    BigWallop Guest

    "R W" <> wrote in message
    news:bnreqi$c7a$...
    > When one is reading perfectly legitimate comments and suggestions, then
    > one comes across
    >
    > Jon wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Apart from that, a lawnmower on a very low setting and do the entire
    > > carpet....

    >
    >
    > is when one needs a new monitor due to laugh induced beverage damage.
    >
    >


    ROFLMAO !!!!! Same here. :))
     
    BigWallop, Oct 30, 2003
    #12
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