How to melt shoe polish?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Kooky45, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. Kooky45

    Kooky45 Guest

    I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    likely to go on fire?

    In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)
     
    Kooky45, Nov 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Ian Stirling" <> wrote in message
    news:41ab436b$0$4020$...
    > Kooky45 <> wrote:
    >> I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >> chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    >> the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    >> again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    >> likely to go on fire?
    >>
    >> In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    >> polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)

    >
    > Put it in the oven at 100C or so.
    > On the cooker is a bad idea, as it may burn.


    But it will still be too hard to use and will break up when you try to. Some
    of the solvent has evaporated. You could try mixing a small amount of oil of
    turpentine into it while it's molten - but shoe polish is pretty cheap still
    (you seem not to have used it for some time!)

    Mary


    >
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Kooky45

    coherers Guest

    "Mary Fisher" <> wrote in message
    news:41ab452c$0$2653$...
    >
    > But it will still be too hard to use and will break up when you try to.

    Some
    > of the solvent has evaporated. You could try mixing a small amount of oil

    of
    > turpentine into it while it's molten - but shoe polish is pretty cheap

    still
    > (you seem not to have used it for some time!)
    >
    > Mary
    >

    I just add some white spirit - mind you that stinks the place out if you do
    it indoors or, worse, in the oven !
     
    coherers, Nov 29, 2004
    #3
  4. Kooky45

    Guest

    On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:

    >I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    >the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    >again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    >likely to go on fire?
    >
    >In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    >polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)


    Put the tin in a basin of hot water for 15 minutes.
     
    , Nov 29, 2004
    #4
  5. Kooky45

    OG Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:
    >
    > >I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    > >chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    > >the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    > >again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    > >likely to go on fire?
    > >
    > >In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    > >polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)

    >
    > Put the tin in a basin of hot water for 15 minutes.


    Then let the whole thing cool - don't try and lift it out until the
    polish has solidified again.

    I didn't - it went all over the place, and it's taken 9 months to get
    the polish out of the vinyl flooring.

    In my case I sat it in a saucepan with half a centimetre of simmering
    water. Melted in less than a minute and cooled back to solid in about
    30.

    HTH
    OG
     
    OG, Nov 29, 2004
    #5
  6. "Kooky45" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    > chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    > the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    > again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    > likely to go on fire?
    >
    > In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    > polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)


    Yes you can; I have done this many many times over the years, (but not with
    the same tin of polish, obviously). However, it is all too easy to overdo it
    on the cooker, and the fumes can then catch fire with unpleasant results. It
    would be better to heat it gently over a little spirit burner or one of
    those squat little candles which used to be used as nightlights in the old
    days, but which seem to be used for 'mood' lighting these days. However, do
    be very careful as liquid shoe polish on the skin is extremely painful and
    seriously unfunny.

    Each time you do this some solvent is lost, so it may only be effective once
    or twice. Unless the tin has a lot left in it, I'd bin it and buy a new one.
    I suppose if I'm objective about it, from a health and safety point of view,
    I should advise you not to do it - period! You could cause an expensive
    fire, or burn yourself quite nastily, which is hardly worth it for a few
    tens of pence worth of polish. However, I must admit to deriving a certain
    miserly pleasure from it. ;-)

    Rick
     
    Richard Sterry, Nov 29, 2004
    #6
  7. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Richard Sterry" <> wrote in message
    news:cofuho$spb$1$...
    > "Kooky45" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >> chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    >> the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    >> again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    >> likely to go on fire?
    >>
    >> In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    >> polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)

    >
    > Yes you can; I have done this many many times over the years, (but not
    > with the same tin of polish, obviously). However, it is all too easy to
    > overdo it on the cooker, and the fumes can then catch fire with unpleasant
    > results. It would be better to heat it gently over a little spirit burner
    > or one of those squat little candles which used to be used as nightlights
    > in the old days, but which seem to be used for 'mood' lighting these days.
    > However, do be very careful as liquid shoe polish on the skin is extremely
    > painful and seriously unfunny.
    >
    > Each time you do this some solvent is lost, so it may only be effective
    > once or twice. Unless the tin has a lot left in it, I'd bin it and buy a
    > new one. I suppose if I'm objective about it, from a health and safety
    > point of view, I should advise you not to do it - period! You could cause
    > an expensive fire, or burn yourself quite nastily, which is hardly worth
    > it for a few tens of pence worth of polish. However, I must admit to
    > deriving a certain miserly pleasure from it. ;-)


    Power and fuel costs money.

    Mary
    >
    > Rick
    >
    >
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Kooky45

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:

    >I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush.


    Either buy some more, or melt it over your double-boiler and add a
    little real turpentine and a few drops of ammonia (you might just need
    the ammonia). If you don't have all of these already, just buy some
    more shoe polish.

    It's a foul task for a cheap product. Really not worth doing. OTOH,
    I'm a bloody fool and can happily spend all day brewing wax polishes -
    there's crateloads of the stuff in the workshop.

    --
    Smert' spamionam
     
    Andy Dingley, Nov 29, 2004
    #8
  9. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Andy Dingley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:
    >
    >>I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >>chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush.

    >
    > Either buy some more, or melt it over your double-boiler and add a
    > little real turpentine and a few drops of ammonia (you might just need
    > the ammonia). If you don't have all of these already, just buy some
    > more shoe polish.
    >
    > It's a foul task for a cheap product. Really not worth doing.


    Quite.

    > OTOH,
    > I'm a bloody fool and can happily spend all day brewing wax polishes -
    > there's crateloads of the stuff in the workshop.


    I make lots too, but only to sell. I never use it ...

    Mary
    >
    > --
    > Smert' spamionam
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #9
  10. On 29 Nov 2004, Kooky45 wrote

    > I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    > chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    > the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    > again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    > likely to go on fire?
    >
    > In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    > polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)


    Got me thinking, that. Starting point:

    I have no idea.

    Wondering:

    One of the simplest ways to make "black polish" --
    black-coloured shellac which one uses for ebonising
    furniture -- is to "melt" a broken pre-vinyl record
    (scratched 78rpm) by soaking it in meths.

    Questions for the expurts:

    Does shoe polish have shellac in it? (Hell -- does
    *anything* have shellac in it any more?) Would a minimal
    amount of meths revitalise shoe polish in the same way that
    it melts 78rpm records?

    --
    Cheers,
    Harvey
     
    Harvey Van Sickle, Nov 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Kooky45

    Peter Parry Guest

    On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:

    > Can I put the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    >again, like candle wax,


    Yes

    >or is there anything in the polish that's likely to go on fire?


    Yes



    --
    Peter Parry.
    http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
     
    Peter Parry, Nov 29, 2004
    #11
  12. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Harvey Van Sickle" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns95B0DF1E42A88whhvans@62.253.162.203...
    >
    > Questions for the expurts:
    >
    > Does shoe polish have shellac in it?


    No.

    (Hell -- does
    > *anything* have shellac in it any more?)


    French polish.

    Would a minimal
    > amount of meths revitalise shoe polish in the same way that
    > it melts 78rpm records?


    No. And it doesn't melt the records, it can dissolve them but it takes some
    time.

    Do you remember making plant pots from them by making them soft in hot water
    and moulding them round a shape of your choice? They had a wavy edge ...

    Never liked them!

    However, I have a collection of 78s if anyone wants to try ... some from the
    1930s. I keep forgetting how heavy they are.

    Mary

    Mary
    >
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Harvey
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #12
  13. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Peter Parry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 29 Nov 2004 07:39:16 -0800, (Kooky45) wrote:
    >
    >> Can I put the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back
    >> together
    >>again, like candle wax,

    >
    > Yes
    >
    >>or is there anything in the polish that's likely to go on fire?

    >
    > Yes


    LOL!
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Peter Parry.
    > http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #13
  14. "Mary Fisher" <> wrote in message
    news:41ab8abc$0$2648$...
    >
    > "Richard Sterry" <> wrote in message
    > news:cofuho$spb$1$...
    >> "Kooky45" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    >>> chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    >>> the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    >>> again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    >>> likely to go on fire?
    >>>
    >>> In fact, does anyone have any good tips on the best way to use this
    >>> polish (brush or cloth, cold or hot, etc.)

    >>
    >> Yes you can; I have done this many many times over the years, (but not
    >> with the same tin of polish, obviously). However, it is all too easy to
    >> overdo it on the cooker, and the fumes can then catch fire with
    >> unpleasant results. It would be better to heat it gently over a little
    >> spirit burner or one of those squat little candles which used to be used
    >> as nightlights in the old days, but which seem to be used for 'mood'
    >> lighting these days. However, do be very careful as liquid shoe polish on
    >> the skin is extremely painful and seriously unfunny.
    >>
    >> Each time you do this some solvent is lost, so it may only be effective
    >> once or twice. Unless the tin has a lot left in it, I'd bin it and buy a
    >> new one. I suppose if I'm objective about it, from a health and safety
    >> point of view, I should advise you not to do it - period! You could cause
    >> an expensive fire, or burn yourself quite nastily, which is hardly worth
    >> it for a few tens of pence worth of polish. However, I must admit to
    >> deriving a certain miserly pleasure from it. ;-)

    >
    > Power and fuel costs money.
    >
    > Mary


    Curses! I never thought of that. :-(

    Rick
     
    Richard Sterry, Nov 29, 2004
    #14
  15. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Richard Sterry" <> wrote in message news:cog8i2$gtg$1
    >>
    >> Power and fuel costs money.
    >>
    >> Mary

    >
    > Curses! I never thought of that. :-(


    LOL!

    That's why my shoes aren't polished ...

    Mary
    >
    > Rick
    >
    >
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #15
  16. On 29 Nov 2004, Mary Fisher wrote

    >
    > "Harvey Van Sickle" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns95B0DF1E42A88whhvans@62.253.162.203...
    >>
    >> Questions for the expurts:
    >>
    >> Does shoe polish have shellac in it?

    >
    > No.
    >
    > (Hell -- does
    >> *anything* have shellac in it any more?)

    >
    > French polish.
    >
    > Would a minimal
    >> amount of meths revitalise shoe polish in the same way that
    >> it melts 78rpm records?

    >
    > No. And it doesn't melt the records, it can dissolve them but it
    > takes some time.


    Tell me about it....it took a while, but c.1985 it was the by far the
    simplest way to source a small amount -- one chair's worth -- of black
    shellac.

    (I bought the 78s from a junk-shop-wannabe-antique store, and asked for
    his "oldest and poorest-quality" records -- more shellac content in the
    older ones, I was told. The look on his face when he found I had zilch
    interest in what the recording was, and just wanted to render them down
    for materials was...not pleased...)

    > However, I have a collection of 78s if anyone wants to try ...
    > some from the 1930s. I keep forgetting how heavy they are.


    1930s would work well for shellac-making....

    --
    Cheers,
    Harvey
     
    Harvey Van Sickle, Nov 29, 2004
    #16
  17. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Harvey Van Sickle" <> wrote in message >>>
    Questions for the expurts:
    >>>
    >>> Does shoe polish have shellac in it?

    >>
    >> No.
    >>
    >> (Hell -- does
    >>> *anything* have shellac in it any more?)

    >>
    >> French polish.
    >>
    >> Would a minimal
    >>> amount of meths revitalise shoe polish in the same way that
    >>> it melts 78rpm records?

    >>
    >> No. And it doesn't melt the records, it can dissolve them but it
    >> takes some time.

    >
    > Tell me about it....it took a while, but c.1985 it was the by far the
    > simplest way to source a small amount -- one chair's worth -- of black
    > shellac.


    Oh it wasn't difficult to find!
    >
    > (I bought the 78s from a junk-shop-wannabe-antique store, and asked for
    > his "oldest and poorest-quality" records -- more shellac content in the
    > older ones, I was told.


    That's true. the later, lighterones weren't the same at all. some of them
    were unbreakable! Took all the fun out of it.

    >> However, I have a collection of 78s if anyone wants to try ...
    >> some from the 1930s. I keep forgetting how heavy they are.

    >
    > 1930s would work well for shellac-making....


    I know. but I don't want any. If I did I have some flakes. I also have some
    ready-made button polish but I bet I couldn't get the stopper off ...

    Mary
    >
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Harvey
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #17
  18. Kooky45

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 21:55:58 GMT, Harvey Van Sickle
    <> wrote:

    > One of the simplest ways to make "black polish" --
    > black-coloured shellac which one uses for ebonising
    > furniture -- is to "melt" a broken pre-vinyl record
    > (scratched 78rpm) by soaking it in meths.


    Have you ever actually done this ?

    I'm not disputing the basic theory (78's are shellac, shellac in
    alcohol makes a "black polish") but with that much granted, this is
    about as unworkable a proces as you can find.

    78's aren't shellac - they're shellac and filler (presumably carbon
    black, although I don't know for sure). This modifies shellac's
    behaviour enormously.

    Shellac won't just dissolve in meths. As someone who does a lot of
    this, I use a coffee grinder to powder it first and even then it takes
    a couple of days.

    Fresh shellac makes polish. Old shellac doesn't make anything useful,
    A few months is the limit for liquid, the age of a 78 is certainly
    enough for solids.

    Black shellac polish is the most foul-tempered and unworkable of all
    shellac polishes. If you're expecting a good result, you need the best
    quality and freshest you can find. Trying to make it out of recycled
    78's is just asking for trouble.

    > Does shoe polish have shellac in it?


    No.

    > (Hell -- does *anything* have shellac in it any more?)


    Lots of things. Sweets (M&Ms / Smarties) and pills are eaten,
    hairspray and furniture finishes still use it as a varnish or polish.
    I use a couple of kilogrammes a year.


    > Would a minimal
    > amount of meths revitalise shoe polish


    Maybe. But it would be unstable in storage and wouldn't keep working
    for very long.
    --
    Smert' spamionam
     
    Andy Dingley, Nov 29, 2004
    #18
  19. Kooky45

    Mary Fisher Guest

    "Andy Dingley" <> wrote in message >
    >> (Hell -- does *anything* have shellac in it any more?)

    >
    > Lots of things. Sweets (M&Ms / Smarties) and pills are eaten,
    > hairspray and furniture finishes still use it as a varnish or polish.
    > I use a couple of kilogrammes a year.


    Of Smarties or hairspray?
    >

    Mary
     
    Mary Fisher, Nov 29, 2004
    #19
  20. Kooky45

    Suz Guest

    >I have a tin of Kiwi shoe polish where the polish has broken into
    > chunks making it difficult to wipe onto a cloth or brush. Can I put
    > the tin on the cooker and melt the polish so it sticks back together
    > again, like candle wax, or is there anything in the polish that's
    > likely to go on fire?



    It's time for our Natural Philisopher to *wax* lyrical about the fringe
    benefits of an Aga.

    Suzanne
     
    Suz, Nov 29, 2004
    #20
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