How to adjust oil furnace electrodes and flame?

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by Logic316, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    Hi folks,
    I have an old cast iron boiler that used to burn coal back in the 1940's,
    and had been converted over to heating oil. It uses a pretty standard
    looking 3450 motor that's about 30 years old, and I clean and maintain the
    boiler myself (a pretty damn messy job, I know). The only problem is, I'm
    not sure how to properly adjust the ignition electrodes. I just vacuumed out
    the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle with
    exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle, 1.35
    gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky. I tried
    another new fuel nozzle with the same results, so I'm pretty sure that the
    nozzle isn't clogged up. I'm guessing it has something to do with the
    position of the ignition electrodes possibly interfering with the fuel spray
    pattern, and I suppose I could go back and forth about a hundred times
    disassembling and reassembling the fuel gun assembly until I get the
    electrodes perfect, but if anybody out there can give me the proper
    specifications I would very much appreciate it (there is no specs label on
    this motor, I checked).

    Also, can anybody give me some tips on adjusting the flame? I have some
    general idea that the flame should be made as big as possible, without
    giving off any smoke or long red "fingers". When I adjusted it last year,
    the furnace seemed to run pretty efficiently and there wasn't much soot in
    it when I cleaned it out, but it would be great if anybody could give me any
    tips on this.
    Thanks in advance :)

    - Logic316

    "I don't mind what Congress does, as long as they don't
    do it in the streets and frighten the horses."
    -- Victor Hugo
    Logic316, Oct 30, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    <.p.jm@see_my_sig_for_address.com> wrote in message
    news:...

    > If it was working right it wouldn't be. you either have
    > excess soot, or excess unburned oil, and neither is good. A well
    > tuned oil fired boiler burns CLEAN.


    There's always been a significant amount of soot that needed to be cleaned
    out, even when I had the oil company guys work on it. There was actually
    LESS soot in the boiler after I had adjusted it last year, but for some
    reason the flame doesn't look the same this time around and I'm not sure
    what I missed.


    >>The only problem is, I'm
    >>not sure how to properly adjust the ignition electrodes. I just vacuumed
    >>out

    >
    > You don't touch them. You have neither the tools nor the
    > knowhow.


    Then tell me what special tools and info I need, if you're so smart. I don't
    have an exhaust gas meter, if that's what you're hinting at, but none of the
    oil company technicians I've seen use those either (and I've had it serviced
    by different companies). They all adjusted everything strictly by eye. This
    can't be rocket science.


    >>The problem is that even when I open the air
    >>intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky. I tried
    >>another new fuel nozzle with the same results, so I'm pretty sure that the
    >>nozzle isn't clogged up.

    >
    > I dunno - throw a few more nozzles at it and see what happens.
    > Try some different ones. Whatever Home Depot has in stock that day
    > will do.


    I used the exact same type of nozzle that the technicians from the oil
    company put on there. And I get my parts from local heating and plumbing
    supply distributors, and shop at family-owned hardware stores, not Home
    Depot, you wiseass.


    > Call someone who knows WTF they're doing. PAY them to come do it.


    Piss off. I got it right last year. You're just jealous because somebody out
    there isn't giving you any work. Well pity party for you, boo fucking
    hoo....

    - Logic316

    "Give a man fire and he's warm for a while. Set a man on fire and he's
    warm for the rest of his life."
    Logic316, Oct 30, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Bubba" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Absolutely fuckin amazing. Many techs wont even mess with a oil
    > furnace unless they do a lot of them yet it simply amazes me how many
    > idiots like you will **** with something that you dont have the
    > slightest clue about.
    > How do you adjust it?
    > You buy expensive digital combustion efficiency equipment, spend 20
    > years of on the job training and then you will have a bit of a clue.
    > Bubba


    Ok, "Bubba".
    NONE of the professional techs who adjusted my furnace before ever used any
    sort of combustion efficiency meter doodads. I watched them, and I know they
    did it by eye. And most of them didn't look nearly old enough to have 20
    years of on the job training. BTW, is it considered some sort of a
    requirement to be trained in acting like a complete asshole before you can
    post on Usenet? Feel free to email me privately if you live anywhere near
    Westchester, NY and I'll be happy to arrange a personal meeting between your
    ass and my foot and we'll see just how big your mouth is going to be then.

    - Logic316

    "Don't you wish there were a knob on the TV to turn up the
    intelligence? There's one marked "Brightness," but it doesn't work."
    -- Gallagher
    Logic316, Oct 30, 2008
    #3
  4. Logic316

    Mark Guest

    I just vacuumed out
    > the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle with
    > exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle, 1.35
    > gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    > intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky.


    Sounds like you have too much oil flow or not enough air flow...

    Are you sure the old nozzle was 1.35 gal per hour and not less?

    Did you mess with the pressure regulator?

    Is something clogging up the air flow?

    Also some burners have two sets of air bands, on is a coarse
    adjustment and one is a fine adjustment?

    Mark
    Mark, Oct 31, 2008
    #4
  5. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Zyp" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Seems like you [Logic316] need to set YOURSELF on fire!
    >
    > --
    > Zyp


    Sure thing, Zyp. But first you show me how.

    - Logic316


    "I haven't committed a crime. What I did was fail to comply with the law."
    -- David Dinkins, former New York City Mayor
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #5
  6. Logic316

    Mikepier Guest

    Mikepier, Oct 31, 2008
    #6
  7. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Zyp" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >> "Give a man fire and he's warm for a while. Set a man on fire and he's
    >> warm for the rest of his life."

    >
    > Seems like you [Logic316] need to set YOURSELF on fire!
    >
    > --
    > Zyp


    Sure thing, buddy. Come over here and show me how.

    - Logic316


    "I haven't committed a crime. What I did was fail to comply with the law."
    -- David Dinkins, former New York City Mayor
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #7
  8. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Mark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I just vacuumed out
    >> the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle
    >> with
    >> exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle,
    >> 1.35
    >> gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    >> intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky.

    >
    > Sounds like you have too much oil flow or not enough air flow...
    >
    > Are you sure the old nozzle was 1.35 gal per hour and not less?
    >
    > Did you mess with the pressure regulator?
    >
    > Is something clogging up the air flow?
    >
    > Also some burners have two sets of air bands, on is a coarse
    > adjustment and one is a fine adjustment?
    >
    > Mark
    >
    >


    I didn't touch the fuel pressure regulator screw, I already know from what
    I've read on the web that that's a big no-no without having the proper
    meter. The fuel nozzle is definitely the same as what was previously on
    there (I had also tried a smaller nozzle that's 1.00 GPM, and it's just as
    smoky). I had cleaned out whole the air intake last year and it's still
    clear now. There isn't a fine adjustment anywhere, just the big collar on
    the left of the motor.

    - Logic316


    "A ship in the harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for."
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #8
  9. Logic316

    Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 19:27:27 -0400, Bubba <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 18:38:39 -0400, "Logic316"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi folks,
    >>I have an old cast iron boiler that used to burn coal back in the 1940's,
    >>and had been converted over to heating oil. It uses a pretty standard
    >>looking 3450 motor that's about 30 years old, and I clean and maintain the
    >>boiler myself (a pretty damn messy job, I know). The only problem is, I'm
    >>not sure how to properly adjust the ignition electrodes. I just vacuumed out
    >>the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle with
    >>exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle, 1.35
    >>gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    >>intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky. I tried
    >>another new fuel nozzle with the same results, so I'm pretty sure that the
    >>nozzle isn't clogged up. I'm guessing it has something to do with the
    >>position of the ignition electrodes possibly interfering with the fuel spray
    >>pattern, and I suppose I could go back and forth about a hundred times
    >>disassembling and reassembling the fuel gun assembly until I get the
    >>electrodes perfect, but if anybody out there can give me the proper
    >>specifications I would very much appreciate it (there is no specs label on
    >>this motor, I checked).
    >>
    >>Also, can anybody give me some tips on adjusting the flame? I have some
    >>general idea that the flame should be made as big as possible, without
    >>giving off any smoke or long red "fingers". When I adjusted it last year,
    >>the furnace seemed to run pretty efficiently and there wasn't much soot in
    >>it when I cleaned it out, but it would be great if anybody could give me any
    >>tips on this.
    >>Thanks in advance :)
    >>
    >>- Logic316
    >>

    >Absolutely fuckin amazing. Many techs wont even mess with a oil
    >furnace unless they do a lot of them yet it simply amazes me how many
    >idiots like you will **** with something that you dont have the
    >slightest clue about.
    >How do you adjust it?
    >You buy expensive digital combustion efficiency equipment, spend 20
    >years of on the job training and then you will have a bit of a clue.
    >Bubba


    For many years before digital combustion efficiency meters, guys
    adjusted oil burners very well entirely by eye (and ear). The guy who
    used to service ours could tell in about 20 seconds if the pump
    pressure was low just by looking at the spray. Adjusting the ignitor
    was the same - he knew exactly how wide the gap needed to be and where
    it had to be positioned. If someone had TOTALLY screwed it up, he
    could get it back in shape in about 15 minutes or less. He'd set
    everything up cold and dry, then start the furnace. Very seldom
    required any extensive tweaking.
    >>"I don't mind what Congress does, as long as they don't
    >> do it in the streets and frighten the horses."
    >> -- Victor Hugo
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    , Oct 31, 2008
    #9
  10. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here's a good write-up on tuning up oil burners and adjusting
    > electrodes.
    >
    > http://www.freepoolheat.com/oil.html



    Thanks, Mike.
    I'll try setting the electrodes flush with the plane of the nozzle like it
    recommends, the rest of the system seems OK.

    - Logic316


    "Don't you wish there were a knob on the TV to turn up the
    intelligence? There's one marked "Brightness," but it doesn't work."
    -- Gallagher
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #10
  11. Logic316

    Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 20:14:25 -0400, "Logic316"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Mark" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> I just vacuumed out
    >>> the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle
    >>> with
    >>> exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle,
    >>> 1.35
    >>> gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    >>> intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky.

    >>
    >> Sounds like you have too much oil flow or not enough air flow...
    >>
    >> Are you sure the old nozzle was 1.35 gal per hour and not less?
    >>
    >> Did you mess with the pressure regulator?
    >>
    >> Is something clogging up the air flow?
    >>
    >> Also some burners have two sets of air bands, on is a coarse
    >> adjustment and one is a fine adjustment?
    >>
    >> Mark
    >>


    Is the flame retention ring in position, and did the nozzle position
    gen changed?
    >>

    >
    >I didn't touch the fuel pressure regulator screw, I already know from what
    >I've read on the web that that's a big no-no without having the proper
    >meter. The fuel nozzle is definitely the same as what was previously on
    >there (I had also tried a smaller nozzle that's 1.00 GPM, and it's just as
    >smoky). I had cleaned out whole the air intake last year and it's still
    >clear now. There isn't a fine adjustment anywhere, just the big collar on
    >the left of the motor.
    >
    >- Logic316
    >
    >
    >"A ship in the harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for."
    >
    >
    >
    >
    , Oct 31, 2008
    #11
  12. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 19:27:27 -0400, Bubba <>


    > For many years before digital combustion efficiency meters, guys
    > adjusted oil burners very well entirely by eye (and ear). The guy who
    > used to service ours could tell in about 20 seconds if the pump
    > pressure was low just by looking at the spray. Adjusting the ignitor
    > was the same - he knew exactly how wide the gap needed to be and where
    > it had to be positioned. If someone had TOTALLY screwed it up, he
    > could get it back in shape in about 15 minutes or less. He'd set
    > everything up cold and dry, then start the furnace. Very seldom
    > required any extensive tweaking.


    I figured as much.
    My motor ran perfectly last year, and the only thing I can think of that's
    different now is the position of the electrodes. I knocked them out of whack
    when cleaning the flame retention ring, and I repositioned them according to
    some tips I found on the web, but the flame is a bit long and smoky even
    with the air intake open all the way. Not to the point where it's smells or
    causing a safety hazard, but I'm sure I'm not getting full efficiency right
    now.

    - Logic316

    "No taxation without respiration."
    -- Rep. Bob Schaffer, Colorado, on repeal of the death tax.
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #12
  13. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    "Zyp" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Aren't you the one with the little saying at the end of your little
    > message. I'd guess you already knew how... or are you not being truthful
    > in your writing?> --


    > Zyp


    That's called a "tagline", young man. If you've been on Usenet for any
    length of time, you would know what that is.
    And I may not know every little detail about tuning a furnace, but I've got
    the safety aspects covered pretty well, and if I'm as stupid as you and a
    couple of the other trolls here think I am, then you're just simply going to
    have to come over and personally show me how to set myself on fire. Unless
    you're a pussy....

    - Logic316


    User: n. The word computer professionals use when they mean "idiot."
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #13
  14. Logic316

    Logic316 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Is the flame retention ring in position, and did the nozzle position
    > gen changed?


    The retention ring has no way of being moved up or down along the fuel pipe,
    though it can be twisted around slightly. It looks pretty primitive, as it's
    permanently machined in place and there is no adjustment there. I see no way
    to adjust the position of the nozzle either, you just change it and that's
    it.

    - Logic316


    "If you think there is good in everybody, you haven't met everybody."
    Logic316, Oct 31, 2008
    #14
  15. Logic316

    Steve Guest

    "Logic316" <> wrote in message
    news:490a44cd$0$5666$...
    > <.p.jm@see_my_sig_for_address.com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> If it was working right it wouldn't be. you either have
    >> excess soot, or excess unburned oil, and neither is good. A well
    >> tuned oil fired boiler burns CLEAN.

    >
    > There's always been a significant amount of soot that needed to be cleaned
    > out, even when I had the oil company guys work on it. There was actually
    > LESS soot in the boiler after I had adjusted it last year, but for some
    > reason the flame doesn't look the same this time around and I'm not sure
    > what I missed.



    You missed the simple fact that properly adjusted oil furnaces don't soot
    up. If it soots up, there is too much oil and not enough air.... the oil
    companies don't care about you having a properly burning furnace, they only
    care about selling oil.

    Now... spend a few bucks and call a *REAL* oil tech and have it done right.
    Steve, Oct 31, 2008
    #15
  16. Logic316

    ransley Guest

    On Oct 30, 6:45 pm, "Logic316" <> wrote:
    > "Bubba" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Absolutely fuckin amazing. Many techs wont even mess with a oil
    > > furnace unless they do a lot of them yet it simply amazes me how many
    > > idiots like you will **** with something that you dont have the
    > > slightest clue about.
    > > How do you adjust it?
    > > You buy expensive digital combustion efficiency equipment, spend 20
    > > years of on the job training and then you will have a bit of a clue.
    > > Bubba

    >
    > Ok, "Bubba".
    > NONE of the professional techs who adjusted my furnace before ever used any
    > sort of combustion efficiency meter doodads. I watched them, and I know they
    > did it by eye. And most of them didn't look nearly old enough to have 20
    > years of on the job training. BTW, is it considered some sort of a
    > requirement to be trained in acting like a complete asshole before you can
    > post on Usenet? Feel free to email me privately if you live anywhere near
    > Westchester, NY and I'll be happy to arrange a personal meeting between your
    > ass and my foot and we'll see just how big your mouth is going to be then..
    >
    > - Logic316
    >
    > "Don't you wish there were a knob on the TV to turn up the
    > intelligence? There's one marked "Brightness," but it doesn't work."
    >  -- Gallagher


    It took bubba 20 years to learn it so it must be gospal. In most
    cities people go to school and learn this stuff from an instructor in
    a no time at all, and they learn it right the first time, not screwing
    up for 19 years.
    ransley, Oct 31, 2008
    #16
  17. i see you're still sucking cocks in your trailer park bj

    <.p.jm@see_my_sig_for_address.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 19:35:49 -0400, "Logic316"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >><.p.jm@see_my_sig_for_address.com> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>
    >>> If it was working right it wouldn't be. you either have
    >>> excess soot, or excess unburned oil, and neither is good. A well
    >>> tuned oil fired boiler burns CLEAN.

    >>
    >>There's always been a significant amount of soot that needed to be cleaned
    >>out, even when I had the oil company guys work on it. There was actually
    >>LESS soot in the boiler after I had adjusted it last year, but for some
    >>reason the flame doesn't look the same this time around and I'm not sure
    >>what I missed.
    >>
    >>
    >>>>The only problem is, I'm
    >>>>not sure how to properly adjust the ignition electrodes. I just vacuumed
    >>>>out
    >>>
    >>> You don't touch them. You have neither the tools nor the
    >>> knowhow.

    >>
    >>Then tell me what special tools and info I need, if you're so smart. I
    >>don't

    >
    > **** off, ****.
    trailer-trash, Oct 31, 2008
    #17
  18. Logic316

    Guest

    On Oct 31, 1:18 am, "zero" <sometimes.zero@_remove_gmail.com> wrote:
    > "Logic316" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:490a5a8c$0$4911$...
    >
    >
    >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > >news:...

    >
    > >> Is the flame retention ring in position, and did the nozzle position
    > >> gen changed?

    >
    > > The retention ring has no way of being moved up or down along the fuel
    > > pipe, though it can be twisted around slightly. It looks pretty primitive,
    > > as it's permanently machined in place and there is no adjustment there.I
    > > see no way to adjust the position of the nozzle either, you just changeit
    > > and that's it.

    >
    > I think you might need a new burner? What else could it be?
    >
    > -zero
    >
    >
    >
    > > - Logic316

    >
    > > "If you think there is good in everybody, you haven't met everybody."- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    New burner? It's only 30 years old. LOL. The furnace is 60 years
    old and was designed to burn coal. You think it just might make
    sense to buy a new furnace? With the price of oil today, it's hard
    to imagine how you could not save enough in fuel costs to justify a
    new furnace. You're likely sending substantial $$$ up the chimney,
    while fretting over how to try to tune up a dinosaur, which even if
    burning as best it can, still is inefficient compared to a new furnace.
    , Oct 31, 2008
    #18
  19. Logic316

    ransley Guest

    On Oct 31, 8:10 am, wrote:
    > On Oct 31, 1:18 am, "zero" <sometimes.zero@_remove_gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Logic316" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:490a5a8c$0$4911$...

    >
    > > > <> wrote in message
    > > >news:...

    >
    > > >> Is the flame retention ring in position, and did the nozzle position
    > > >> gen changed?

    >
    > > > The retention ring has no way of being moved up or down along the fuel
    > > > pipe, though it can be twisted around slightly. It looks pretty primitive,
    > > > as it's permanently machined in place and there is no adjustment there. I
    > > > see no way to adjust the position of the nozzle either, you just change it
    > > > and that's it.

    >
    > > I think you might need a new burner? What else could it be?

    >
    > > -zero

    >
    > > > - Logic316

    >
    > > > "If you think there is good in everybody, you haven't met everybody."- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -

    >
    > New burner?   It's only 30 years old.  LOL.   The furnace is 60 years
    > old and was designed to burn coal.    You think it just might make
    > sense to buy a new furnace?    With the price of oil today, it's hard
    > to imagine how you could not save enough in fuel costs to justify a
    > new furnace.   You're likely sending substantial $$$ up the chimney,
    > while fretting over how to try to tune up a dinosaur, which even if
    > burning as best it can, still is inefficient compared to a new furnace.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    What is it, he first says cast iron boiler, bubbass dreams up furnace,
    now its a cast iron furnace? If cast furnace its 50-60% efficent, a
    boiler maybe 65% overall, He should dump whatever it is and get a high
    efficency unit, what a waste.
    ransley, Oct 31, 2008
    #19
  20. Logic316

    Boden Guest

    Bubba wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 18:38:39 -0400, "Logic316"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi folks,
    >>I have an old cast iron boiler that used to burn coal back in the 1940's,
    >>and had been converted over to heating oil. It uses a pretty standard
    >>looking 3450 motor that's about 30 years old, and I clean and maintain the
    >>boiler myself (a pretty damn messy job, I know). The only problem is, I'm
    >>not sure how to properly adjust the ignition electrodes. I just vacuumed out
    >>the boiler, replaced the oil filter, and then replaced the fuel nozzle with
    >>exactly the same kind that it was using before (60 degrees spray angle, 1.35
    >>gallons per hour flow rate). The problem is that even when I open the air
    >>intake band all the way, the flame is still long, red and smoky. I tried
    >>another new fuel nozzle with the same results, so I'm pretty sure that the
    >>nozzle isn't clogged up. I'm guessing it has something to do with the
    >>position of the ignition electrodes possibly interfering with the fuel spray
    >>pattern, and I suppose I could go back and forth about a hundred times
    >>disassembling and reassembling the fuel gun assembly until I get the
    >>electrodes perfect, but if anybody out there can give me the proper
    >>specifications I would very much appreciate it (there is no specs label on
    >>this motor, I checked).
    >>
    >>Also, can anybody give me some tips on adjusting the flame? I have some
    >>general idea that the flame should be made as big as possible, without
    >>giving off any smoke or long red "fingers". When I adjusted it last year,
    >>the furnace seemed to run pretty efficiently and there wasn't much soot in
    >>it when I cleaned it out, but it would be great if anybody could give me any
    >>tips on this.
    >>Thanks in advance :)
    >>
    >>- Logic316
    >>

    >
    > Absolutely fuckin amazing. Many techs wont even mess with a oil
    > furnace unless they do a lot of them yet it simply amazes me how many
    > idiots like you will **** with something that you dont have the
    > slightest clue about.
    > How do you adjust it?
    > You buy expensive digital combustion efficiency equipment, spend 20
    > years of on the job training and then you will have a bit of a clue.
    > Bubba
    >
    >>"I don't mind what Congress does, as long as they don't
    >>do it in the streets and frighten the horses."
    >>-- Victor Hugo
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    My oil burner tech spent about 5 minutes showing me how to set the
    electrodes on my Beckett AFs. I now replace the nozzles, clean out the
    oil filters, measure combustion by-products (with eBay acquired testers).

    I suppose it could take 20 years to learn, but if you went to school on
    a long bus 5 to 10 minutes will do.

    A copy of the Beckett Oil Burner Manual (Form 6104BAF R0803) is useful
    and answers most questions.

    The Oil Burner Guild would like to discourage knowledgeable home owners
    from doing this simple task. But, guilds work that way. If you're not
    knowledgeable then you should become informed (and safe) first or hire a
    guild member.

    Boden
    Boden, Oct 31, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertising

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