How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by alvinamorey@notmail.com, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. Guest

    How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?
    They are 90lb bags. From what I recall, it was 3 bags per cu yard.
    Yet I got this guy at the local lumberyard who insists I need 5 bags
    per... Sounds to me he is trying to make more money...

    I am referring to a standard mix of 1 part portland, 2 parts sand and
    3 parts stone.

    It's been awhile since I made cement so I am asking to be sure. I'm
    checking into the cost to make my own from scratch rather than truck
    in some ready mixed stuff in a tub.
    , Nov 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. Grandpa Guest

    In article <>,
    "Bob F" <> wrote:

    > I don't think so.
    >
    >
    > "The Freon Cowboy" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > 3
    > >
    > >
    > > wrote:
    > >>How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?

    > >


    I don't think so either.
    It will depend on the size of the aggregate; see:
    http://www.cement.org/tech/faq_cement.asp

    --
    Grandpa
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://improve-usenet.org/
    Grandpa, Nov 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. zxcvbob Guest

    wrote:
    > How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?
    > They are 90lb bags. From what I recall, it was 3 bags per cu yard.
    > Yet I got this guy at the local lumberyard who insists I need 5 bags
    > per... Sounds to me he is trying to make more money...
    >
    > I am referring to a standard mix of 1 part portland, 2 parts sand and
    > 3 parts stone.
    >
    > It's been awhile since I made cement so I am asking to be sure. I'm
    > checking into the cost to make my own from scratch rather than truck
    > in some ready mixed stuff in a tub.



    4 1/2. Five if you mix it a little stronger. Don't add too much water.

    Best regards,
    Bob
    zxcvbob, Nov 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Doug Miller Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?
    >They are 90lb bags. From what I recall, it was 3 bags per cu yard.
    >Yet I got this guy at the local lumberyard who insists I need 5 bags
    >per... Sounds to me he is trying to make more money...
    >
    >I am referring to a standard mix of 1 part portland, 2 parts sand and
    >3 parts stone.


    Premix aggregate yields 2/3 cubic FOOT of concrete per 90# bag.
    That's 27 / (2/3) = 40.5 bags of aggregate per cubic yard.

    So if you're making your own mix, with the cement being 1 part in 6, you'd
    need 40.5 / 6 = just under 7 bags.

    --
    Regards,
    Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

    It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
    Doug Miller, Nov 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Oren Guest

    On Tue, 06 Nov 2007 15:08:46 -0600, wrote:

    >How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?
    >They are 90lb bags. From what I recall, it was 3 bags per cu yard.
    >Yet I got this guy at the local lumberyard who insists I need 5 bags
    >per... Sounds to me he is trying to make more money...


    Buy five and take two back; or one.

    --
    Oren

    I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison
    Oren, Nov 6, 2007
    #5
  6. dpb Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > Note: cement and concrete are not the same thing at all.
    >
    > Concrete comes in different size bags. Concrete is formulated to
    > different specifications and strengths.

    ....

    It would be the cement that comes in the bags...

    --
    dpb, Nov 7, 2007
    #6
  7. Harry K Guest

    On Nov 7, 9:19 am, dpb <> wrote:
    > Joseph Meehan wrote:
    > > Note: cement and concrete are not the same thing at all.

    >
    > > Concrete comes in different size bags. Concrete is formulated to
    > > different specifications and strengths.

    >
    > ...
    >
    > It would be the cement that comes in the bags...
    >
    > --


    Errm..you can also buy premix (dry) concrete in the bag.

    Harry K
    Harry K, Nov 7, 2007
    #7
  8. DanG Guest

    Gfretwell gave you the correct answer.

    When ordering or specifying concrete today, it is done by
    requesting a PSI strength depending on how the concrete is to be
    used. 2500# for residential footings, minimum; most commercial
    work is speced at 3500#; tilt up and prestress run 4500-6000#.
    Each excess gallon on water per yard above the design water/cement
    ratio reduces the strength by 500#, so you will often see
    references to not using too much water.

    The very old method of ordering, mixing, or thinking about
    concrete as xxx number of sacks per yard is not used anymore, but
    most concrete people (at least we old ones) do understand the
    terminology.

    It kinda ends up knowing what you are doing with the concrete, the
    stresses to which it will be exposed, your expectations for the
    finish product, etc. 3 sack will set up, get hard, and will
    crack. 6 sack will set up, get hard, and will crack. The six
    sack can take a great deal more load before crushing.

    Your call. There is an excellent explanation with facts and
    figures here: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Concrete

    --
    ______________________________
    Keep the whole world singing . . . .
    DanG (remove the sevens)




    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > How many bags of Portland Cement for a CU Yard?
    > They are 90lb bags. From what I recall, it was 3 bags per cu
    > yard.
    > Yet I got this guy at the local lumberyard who insists I need 5
    > bags
    > per... Sounds to me he is trying to make more money...
    >
    > I am referring to a standard mix of 1 part portland, 2 parts
    > sand and
    > 3 parts stone.
    >
    > It's been awhile since I made cement so I am asking to be sure.
    > I'm
    > checking into the cost to make my own from scratch rather than
    > truck
    > in some ready mixed stuff in a tub.
    DanG, Nov 8, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Wed, 7 Nov 2007 19:21:08 -0600, "DanG" <> wrote:

    >Gfretwell gave you the correct answer.
    >
    >When ordering or specifying concrete today, it is done by
    >requesting a PSI strength depending on how the concrete is to be
    >used. 2500# for residential footings, minimum; most commercial
    >work is speced at 3500#; tilt up and prestress run 4500-6000#.
    >Each excess gallon on water per yard above the design water/cement
    >ratio reduces the strength by 500#, so you will often see
    >references to not using too much water.
    >
    >The very old method of ordering, mixing, or thinking about
    >concrete as xxx number of sacks per yard is not used anymore, but
    >most concrete people (at least we old ones) do understand the
    >terminology.
    >
    >It kinda ends up knowing what you are doing with the concrete, the
    >stresses to which it will be exposed, your expectations for the
    >finish product, etc. 3 sack will set up, get hard, and will
    >crack. 6 sack will set up, get hard, and will crack. The six
    >sack can take a great deal more load before crushing.
    >
    >Your call. There is an excellent explanation with facts and
    >figures here: http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Concrete


    For a simple feedshed floor, I only need the minimum. It's only for
    me to walk on. On the other hand, I always make my concrete more
    durable than that sack-crete. That stuff always seems weak and
    inferior. (not enough portland in it).
    , Nov 8, 2007
    #9
  10. Harry K Guest

    On Nov 7, 6:29 pm, wrote:
    > On Wed, 7 Nov 2007 19:21:08 -0600, "DanG" <> wrote:
    > >Gfretwell gave you the correct answer.

    >
    > >When ordering or specifying concrete today, it is done by
    > >requesting a PSI strength depending on how the concrete is to be
    > >used. 2500# for residential footings, minimum; most commercial
    > >work is speced at 3500#; tilt up and prestress run 4500-6000#.
    > >Each excess gallon on water per yard above the design water/cement
    > >ratio reduces the strength by 500#, so you will often see
    > >references to not using too much water.

    >
    > >The very old method of ordering, mixing, or thinking about
    > >concrete as xxx number of sacks per yard is not used anymore, but
    > >most concrete people (at least we old ones) do understand the
    > >terminology.

    >
    > >It kinda ends up knowing what you are doing with the concrete, the
    > >stresses to which it will be exposed, your expectations for the
    > >finish product, etc. 3 sack will set up, get hard, and will
    > >crack. 6 sack will set up, get hard, and will crack. The six
    > >sack can take a great deal more load before crushing.

    >
    > >Your call. There is an excellent explanation with facts and
    > >figures here:http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Concrete

    >
    > For a simple feedshed floor, I only need the minimum. It's only for
    > me to walk on. On the other hand, I always make my concrete more
    > durable than that sack-crete. That stuff always seems weak and
    > inferior. (not enough portland in it).- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Yep, I buy the sack-crete and add 1 bag of portland. Add about a
    coffee can of portland per bag when mixing. Excess is kept in one of
    the ubiquitous white buckets with the sealing top. Seems to keep for
    years that way.

    Harry K
    Harry K, Nov 8, 2007
    #10
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