HELP My boiler won' t fire up

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by andyG@stuck.com, Nov 30, 2003.

  1. Guest

    The pilot light on my gas fired boiler went out I re lit it but now
    when I turn the stat on the boiler up I can't get the thing to fire
    up. I have turned the room stat right up and the pump works OK and
    when the pump is on there is a power light on at the spur
    The programmer is set to constant The pilot light stays on OK.
    One thing all this seemed to happen after I managed to drill thro the
    main 30 amp feed to the electric cooker whilst installing a new cooker
    hood ..... oops nice one ! Don't know whether or not this had anything
    to do with it ? Same circuit etc. Fixed that tho + replaced fuse wire
    etc.

    Pretty desperate now to get some heat urgently so any help would be
    most appreciated

    Cheers
     
    , Nov 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Andy Hall Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 16:17:31 +0000, wrote:

    >The pilot light on my gas fired boiler went out I re lit it but now
    >when I turn the stat on the boiler up I can't get the thing to fire
    >up. I have turned the room stat right up and the pump works OK and
    >when the pump is on there is a power light on at the spur
    >The programmer is set to constant The pilot light stays on OK.
    >One thing all this seemed to happen after I managed to drill thro the
    >main 30 amp feed to the electric cooker whilst installing a new cooker
    >hood ..... oops nice one ! Don't know whether or not this had anything
    >to do with it ? Same circuit etc. Fixed that tho + replaced fuse wire
    >etc.
    >
    >Pretty desperate now to get some heat urgently so any help would be
    >most appreciated
    >
    >Cheers



    Mentioning the make and model of the boiler wouldn't hurt... :)

    How is the boiler connected to the cooker circuit? Normally the
    cooker should be on a dedicated circuit with perhaps a 13A outlet at
    the switch panel. You shouldn't have a spur from that to a boiler
    outlet......

    Probably not the immediate cause of your problems but this should be
    corrected if wired in that way.


    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
     
    Andy Hall, Nov 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 16:53:16 +0000, Andy Hall <>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 16:17:31 +0000, wrote:
    >
    >>The pilot light on my gas fired boiler went out I re lit it but now
    >>when I turn the stat on the boiler up I can't get the thing to fire
    >>up. I have turned the room stat right up and the pump works OK and
    >>when the pump is on there is a power light on at the spur
    >>The programmer is set to constant The pilot light stays on OK.
    >>One thing all this seemed to happen after I managed to drill thro the
    >>main 30 amp feed to the electric cooker whilst installing a new cooker
    >>hood ..... oops nice one ! Don't know whether or not this had anything
    >>to do with it ? Same circuit etc. Fixed that tho + replaced fuse wire
    >>etc.
    >>
    >>Pretty desperate now to get some heat urgently so any help would be
    >>most appreciated
    >>
    >>Cheers

    >
    >
    >Mentioning the make and model of the boiler wouldn't hurt... :)
    >
    >How is the boiler connected to the cooker circuit? Normally the
    >cooker should be on a dedicated circuit with perhaps a 13A outlet at
    >the switch panel. You shouldn't have a spur from that to a boiler
    >outlet......
    >
    >Probably not the immediate cause of your problems but this should be
    >corrected if wired in that way.
    >
    >
    >.andy
    >
    >To email, substitute .nospam with .gl


    Sorry its an old Glow Worm ( Space Saver ) but still 'glowing'
    strong !
    I guess that it was just a coincidence that the boiler went down at
    the same time as I blew the cooker fuse out. ( Too traumatic for the
    old boy )
    I did think that the cooker should be on a dedicated circuit and this
    appears to be so.
    I've never had a free standing cooker here - just wired the seperate
    oven (gas hob ) to switch panel. Surprised / shocked me that cable
    was just under plaster with a thin strip of plastic over ... no real
    protective sheathing ( metal ) I guess regs. are different now ?

    Anyway good news I managed to get it to fire up. Don't really know
    what I did but could be some sort of safety button on boiler stat .
    I took knob off an pushed in .......
    The previous owner did not leave a manual or anything so its been hit
    + miss etc. I must try and get hold of some documentation to see how
    everything works - hate not knowing.

    Cheers
     
    , Nov 30, 2003
    #3
  4. Guest

    In uk.d-i-y, wrote:
    >
    > I've never had a free standing cooker here - just wired the seperate
    > oven (gas hob ) to switch panel. Surprised / shocked me that cable
    > was just under plaster with a thin strip of plastic over ... no real
    > protective sheathing ( metal ) I guess regs. are different now ?
    >

    No: regs continue to assume a degree of sense on the part of the drill
    holder ;-) It continues to be OK to run cables simply buried in the plaster,
    *provided* they're in a direct horiozontal or vertical line from a visible
    fitting; or in a couple of well-defined narrow strips - horizontal within
    6inches of the wall-ceiling corner, and 6ins either side of the corners of
    the room. Other routes require the cable to be either more than 2 inches
    deep from the surface of the wall, or to have extra protection against
    nailing/drilling. (The idea is to protect against "foreseeable" wall
    penetration - picture pins and drill-holes for normal-size wallplugs.
    The belief is that heftier works will be undertaken with due care...)

    Many people find that even the cheap cable detectors work quite well,
    especially when there's current flowing in the cable. (Detecting wooden
    studs reliably isn't as well done by cheap scanners; but metal, expecially
    with dancing electrons, is easier.)

    HTH, Stefek
     
    , Nov 30, 2003
    #4
  5. Guest

    On 30 Nov 2003 21:32:11 GMT, wrote:

    >In uk.d-i-y, wrote:
    >>
    >> I've never had a free standing cooker here - just wired the seperate
    >> oven (gas hob ) to switch panel. Surprised / shocked me that cable
    >> was just under plaster with a thin strip of plastic over ... no real
    >> protective sheathing ( metal ) I guess regs. are different now ?
    >>

    >No: regs continue to assume a degree of sense on the part of the drill
    >holder ;-) It continues to be OK to run cables simply buried in the plaster,
    >*provided* they're in a direct horiozontal or vertical line from a visible
    >fitting; or in a couple of well-defined narrow strips - horizontal within
    >6inches of the wall-ceiling corner, and 6ins either side of the corners of
    >the room. Other routes require the cable to be either more than 2 inches
    >deep from the surface of the wall, or to have extra protection against
    >nailing/drilling. (The idea is to protect against "foreseeable" wall
    >penetration - picture pins and drill-holes for normal-size wallplugs.
    >The belief is that heftier works will be undertaken with due care...)
    >
    >Many people find that even the cheap cable detectors work quite well,
    >especially when there's current flowing in the cable. (Detecting wooden
    >studs reliably isn't as well done by cheap scanners; but metal, expecially
    >with dancing electrons, is easier.)
    >
    >HTH, Stefek


    Yep I really must invest in cable detector .... they used to be a
    luxury item in the old days . Don't have much need for one but for
    those odd occasions etc. Sods law that the one mounting screw hole
    just had to be right in the path of the cable ....... no excuse + just
    as well drills are made of plastic these days !
    Been spoilt living/working in Portugal for 13 years . Built a new
    house there - sank tough plastic trunking into hollow bricks & covered
    with good 1/2 '' cement render,
    One other thing why is the cable to my new stainless steel cooker hood
    only 2 core ..... no earth ??
     
    , Nov 30, 2003
    #5
  6. Guest

    In uk.d-i-y, wrote:
    >
    > One other thing why is the cable to my new stainless steel cooker hood
    > only 2 core ..... no earth ??


    If this cable is what the manufacturer has fitted, then we presume the
    cooker hood has been built not to need an earth - wot was previously
    called "double insulated" and is now called "Class II". There should be
    a little symbol somewhere on the cooker hood (probably on the rating
    plate which says how many watts it eats) showing one square inside another.

    But if the cable's been replaced or extended by some random bodge merchant,
    you'll be wanting to undo said bodge...

    HTH, Stefek
     
    , Nov 30, 2003
    #6
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