Height of Radon Vent Pipe

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by hr(bob) hofmann@att.net, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
     
    hr(bob) , Jun 23, 2012
    #1
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  2. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 20:15:30 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    <> wrote:

    >I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    >the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    >pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    >cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    >not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    >even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    >no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?


    So that the wind doesn't carry the radon back into the upper, living, areas of
    the house.
     
    , Jun 23, 2012
    #2
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  3. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Jun 23, 1:54 am, ""
    <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 20:15:30 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    > >the house to which they are attached.  As long as the output of the
    > >pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > >cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > >not an area where people congregate.  Like behind a big evergreen
    > >where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > >even get there.  The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > >no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > So that the wind doesn't carry the radon back into the upper, living, areas of
    > the house.


    Yes, I agree that's the reason. If the discharge was located on a
    side of the house where it's far away
    from any window or door, then the problem of it coming
    back into the house is essentially
    eliminated. Although if there are soffit vents, some of
    the air could still make it's way into the attic. Then you
    still have the problem of people standing near it outside.
    I don't know how you can say for sure where people
    will or won't congregate. Just vent it where there is no chance of
    any of it getting back in and be done with it.
     
    , Jun 23, 2012
    #3
  4. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >
    > > I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    > > the house to which they are attached.  As long as the output of the
    > > pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > > cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > > not an area where people congregate.  Like behind a big evergreen
    > > where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > > even get there.  The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > > no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    > instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    > easily painted same color as siding.
    >
    > One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    > rain diverter built-in ??


    I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    debris. She isn't too happy!!!
     
    hr(bob) , Jun 23, 2012
    #4
  5. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > >> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >
    > >> > I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    > >> > the house to which they are attached.  As long as the output of the
    > >> > pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > >> > cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > >> > not an area where people congregate.  Like behind a big evergreen
    > >> > where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > >> > even get there.  The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > >> > no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > >> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    > >> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    > >> easily painted same color as siding.

    >
    > >> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    > >> rain diverter built-in ??

    >
    > >I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    > >debris.  She isn't too happy!!!

    >
    > Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris.  Water can easily
    > condense as the temperature changes.  So, the fan needs to handle
    > water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    > pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -
    >



    Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    tips?
     
    , Jun 24, 2012
    #5
  6. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    On Jun 24, 11:16 am, "" <>
    wrote:
    > On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >
    > > <> wrote:
    > > >On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > > >> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >
    > > >> > I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    > > >> > the house to which they are attached.  As long as the output of the
    > > >> > pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > > >> > cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as itis
    > > >> > not an area where people congregate.  Like behind a big evergreen
    > > >> > where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > > >> > even get there.  The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > > >> > no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > > >> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    > > >> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    > > >> easily painted same color as siding.

    >
    > > >> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    > > >> rain diverter built-in ??

    >
    > > >I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    > > >debris.  She isn't too happy!!!

    >
    > > Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris.  Water can easily
    > > condense as the temperature changes.  So, the fan needs to handle
    > > water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    > > pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees.  Any more practical
    > tips?- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    You just said what I was thinking.
     
    hr(bob) , Jun 24, 2012
    #6
  7. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    On Jun 23, 7:59 pm, Steve Barker <> wrote:
    > On 6/22/2012 10:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >
    > > I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    > > the house to which they are attached.  As long as the output of the
    > > pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > > cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > > not an area where people congregate.  Like behind a big evergreen
    > > where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > > even get there.  The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > > no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > so the stuff don't blow back in the window.  Some think it's dangerous.
    >
    > --
    > Steve Barker
    > remove the "not" from my address to email


    The outlet is on the outside of the foundation wall, behind a heavy
    hedge of evergreens. No one ever goes there except to pick up
    accumulated wind-blown trash every once in a while (three times a year
    maybe). So, I don'tt think anyone is going to get contaminated unless
    they are homeless and set up a tiny tent behind the hedges so that no
    one can see them.
     
    hr(bob) , Jun 24, 2012
    #7
  8. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > >> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >> >On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > >> >> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >
    > >> >> > I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the heightof
    > >> >> > the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    > >> >> > pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > >> >> > cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > >> >> > not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    > >> >> > where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > >> >> > even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > >> >> > no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > >> >> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    > >> >> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    > >> >> easily painted same color as siding.

    >
    > >> >> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    > >> >> rain diverter built-in ??

    >
    > >> >I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    > >> >debris. She isn't too happy!!!

    >
    > >> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    > >> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    > >> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    > >> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees.  Any more practical
    > >tips?

    >
    > One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees.  One only needs to avoid the
    > trees in your particular installation.  My vent is above the roof line
    > per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees.  If it
    > was at the roof line, it would not be.  The OP asked why the vent
    > needed to be higher.  I gave one *possible* reason.  My main point was
    > why it is not necessary to keep rain water out.  - Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    escapes you
     
    , Jun 25, 2012
    #8
  9. hr(bob)

    George Guest

    On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    > On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> <> wrote:
    >>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >>
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >>
    >>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    >>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    >>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    >>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    >>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    >>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    >>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >>
    >>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    >>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    >>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.

    >>
    >>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    >>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??

    >>
    >>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    >>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!

    >>
    >>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>> tips?

    >>
    >> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    > escapes you
    >


    I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    radon remediation exhaust looks like this:

    http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg

    I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
     
    George, Jun 25, 2012
    #9
  10. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Jun 25, 10:46 am, George <> wrote:
    > On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""

    >
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > >>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >
    > >>>> <> wrote:
    > >>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > >>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the heightof
    > >>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    > >>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    > >>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    > >>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    > >>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    > >>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    > >>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > >>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    > >>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    > >>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.

    >
    > >>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    > >>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??

    >
    > >>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    > >>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!

    >
    > >>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    > >>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    > >>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    > >>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees.  Any more practical
    > >>> tips?

    >
    > >> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees.  One only needs to avoid the
    > >> trees in your particular installation.  My vent is above the roof line
    > >> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees.  If it
    > >> was at the roof line, it would not be.  The OP asked why the vent
    > >> needed to be higher.  I gave one *possible* reason.  My main pointwas
    > >> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out.  - Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    > > escapes you

    >
    > I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    > radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >
    > http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >
    > I wonder if he/she is a hippie?- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    The point is that if the issue is that you need to avoid
    having debris like leaves falling into the pipe, that can
    be solved with a simple screen or cap. A simple
    screen cover could even be in the diagram you
    provided, just not shown. It's just a simple wire
    screen.


    So, yeah, I'd say someone who instead proposes extending the pipe up
    above the height of the trees is probably a hippie.
     
    , Jun 25, 2012
    #10
  11. hr(bob)

    gregz Guest

    George <> wrote:
    > On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    >>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    >>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    >>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    >>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    >>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    >>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>
    >>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    >>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    >>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>
    >>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    >>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>
    >>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    >>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>
    >>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>> tips?
    >>>
    >>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >> escapes you
    >>

    >
    > I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    > radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >
    > http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >
    > I wonder if he/she is a hippie?


    All systems must account for water, condensation or rain. It's real dum to
    put an open pipe sticking up. It's also real dum to use a large diameter
    pipe. It does not depend on fan size, it's all about how much flow you get.
    I put up a pipe with a bend above roof. I have a water collection system
    for condensation. It's easy to clog. I only have to run the system in the
    colder months, and a bug screen is necessary. My 120 cfm German fan is
    pulling about 20-30 cfm, at 1 inch pull.
    My radon is 1.5 in the summer without fan. In winter it could jump to 20
    times that without fan.

    Greg
     
    gregz, Jun 25, 2012
    #11
  12. hr(bob)

    George Guest

    On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    > On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>
    >>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>
    >>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>> text -
    >>>>
    >>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>> tips?
    >>>>
    >>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>> escapes you
    >>>

    >>
    >> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>
    >> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>
    >> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    > usually looks like this:
    >
    > http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >
    > (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    > few did not go past roof line !!)


    I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like
    your image shows.
     
    George, Jun 26, 2012
    #12
  13. hr(bob)

    George Guest

    On 6/25/2012 12:53 PM, wrote:
    > On Jun 25, 10:46 am, George <> wrote:
    >> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""

    >>
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >>
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >>
    >>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the height of
    >>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of the
    >>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent pipe
    >>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long as it is
    >>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one could
    >>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better, there are
    >>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >>
    >>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout pipe,
    >>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so obvious, and
    >>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.

    >>
    >>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan have a
    >>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??

    >>
    >>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it fills with
    >>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!

    >>
    >>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>> tips?

    >>
    >>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >>>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>> escapes you

    >>
    >> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>
    >> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>
    >> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > The point is that if the issue is that you need to avoid
    > having debris like leaves falling into the pipe, that can
    > be solved with a simple screen or cap. A simple
    > screen cover could even be in the diagram you
    > provided, just not shown. It's just a simple wire
    > screen.
    >
    >
    > So, yeah, I'd say someone who instead proposes extending the pipe up
    > above the height of the trees is probably a hippie.
    >

    But you chastised the person who questioned the omission of a cap. Does
    that make them a double hippy or maybe something else?
     
    George, Jun 26, 2012
    #13
  14. hr(bob)

    George Guest

    On 6/25/2012 3:32 PM, CRNG wrote:
    > On Mon, 25 Jun 2012 18:24:22 +0000 (UTC), gregz <>
    > wrote Re Re: Height of Radon Vent Pipe:
    >
    >> All systems must account for water, condensation or rain. It's real dum to
    >> put an open pipe sticking up. It's also real dum to use a large diameter
    >> pipe.

    >
    > What's really dumb is spelling "dumb" as "dum".
    >

    prolly...
     
    George, Jun 26, 2012
    #14
  15. hr(bob)

    gregz Guest

    George <> wrote:
    > On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    >> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>>> text -
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>>> tips?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>
    >>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>
    >>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>>> escapes you
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>>
    >>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    >> usually looks like this:
    >>
    >> http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >>
    >> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    >> few did not go past roof line !!)

    >
    > I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    > version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like your image shows.


    I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    going on.

    He includes water trap and cap.

    http://threethingsverydullindeed.blogspot.com/2011/02/radon-mitigation-system-installation.html

    Greg
     
    gregz, Jun 26, 2012
    #15
  16. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 00:27:30 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:

    >George <> wrote:
    >> On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    >>> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >>>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>>>> text -
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>>>> tips?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>>>> escapes you
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >>>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    >>> usually looks like this:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >>>
    >>> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    >>> few did not go past roof line !!)

    >>
    >> I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    >> version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like your image shows.

    >
    >I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    >closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    >large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    >one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    >going on.


    You mistakenly assume anyone cares about what's really going on. Histeria,
    and all (sorta like AGW). I had to put a system in my NY house, >20 years
    ago, to sell it. There was no way I'd put it in for myself.
     
    , Jun 26, 2012
    #16
  17. hr(bob)

    gregz Guest

    "" <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 00:27:30 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:
    >
    >> George <> wrote:
    >>> On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    >>>> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >>>>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>>>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>>>>> text -
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>>>>> tips?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>>>>> escapes you
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >>>>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    >>>> usually looks like this:
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    >>>> few did not go past roof line !!)
    >>>
    >>> I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    >>> version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like your image shows.

    >>
    >> I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    >> closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    >> large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    >> one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    >> going on.

    >
    > You mistakenly assume anyone cares about what's really going on. Histeria,
    > and all (sorta like AGW). I had to put a system in my NY house, >20 years
    > ago, to sell it. There was no way I'd put it in for myself.


    The thread is about pipes.

    Would you care if someone forced you to smoke two packs of cigarettes a day
    ?
    That's what's happening if I didn't install fan.

    Greg
     
    gregz, Jun 26, 2012
    #17
  18. hr(bob)

    hr(bob) Guest

    On Jun 25, 8:29 pm, gregz <> wrote:
    > "" <> wrote:
    > > On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 00:27:30 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:

    >
    > >> George <> wrote:
    > >>> On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    > >>>> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    > >>>>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    > >>>>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > >>>>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""

    >
    > >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    > >>>>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    > >>>>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "

    >
    > >>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    > >>>>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    > >>>>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> height of
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> the
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> pipe
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> as it is
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> could
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> there are
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    > >>>>>>>>>>> pipe,
    > >>>>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    > >>>>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    > >>>>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    > >>>>>>>>>>> have a
    > >>>>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    > >>>>>>>>>> fills with
    > >>>>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!

    >
    > >>>>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    > >>>>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    > >>>>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    > >>>>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    > >>>>>>>>> text -

    >
    > >>>>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    > >>>>>>>> tips?

    >
    > >>>>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    > >>>>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    > >>>>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    > >>>>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    > >>>>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    > >>>>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >>>>>>> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > >>>>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    > >>>>>> escapes you

    >
    > >>>>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    > >>>>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:

    >
    > >>>>>http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg

    >
    > >>>>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?

    >
    > >>>> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    > >>>> usually looks like this:

    >
    > >>>>http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg

    >
    > >>>> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, anda
    > >>>> few did not go past roof line !!)

    >
    > >>> I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    > >>> version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like your image shows.

    >
    > >> I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    > >> closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    > >> large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    > >> one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    > >> going on.

    >
    > > You mistakenly assume anyone cares about what's really going on.  Histeria,
    > > and all (sorta like AGW).  I had to put a system in my NY house, >20 years
    > > ago, to sell it.  There was no way I'd put it in for myself.

    >
    > The thread is about pipes.
    >
    > Would you care if someone forced you to smoke two packs of cigarettes a day
    > ?
    > That's what's happening if I didn't install fan.
    >
    > Greg- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Well, I'm going to leave mine terminated on the outside wall about 20
    inches above ground level with a dryer vent cap to keep critters out
    until I am ready to sell the house, then I'll see if I even really
    need it as my levels were about 3.5 in the middle of winter many years
    ago, and the ground water levels have changed quite a bit with the
    addition of storm water drains in a nearby subdivision that have
    lowered the water table so much that my sujmp pump rarely even runs
    any more.
     
    hr(bob) , Jun 26, 2012
    #18
  19. hr(bob)

    Guest

    On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 01:29:12 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:

    >"" <> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 00:27:30 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> George <> wrote:
    >>>> On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    >>>>> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >>>>>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>>>>>> text -
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>>>>>> tips?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>>>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>>>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>>>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>>>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>>>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>>>>>> escapes you
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >>>>>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    >>>>> usually looks like this:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    >>>>> few did not go past roof line !!)
    >>>>
    >>>> I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    >>>> version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just like your image shows.
    >>>
    >>> I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    >>> closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    >>> large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    >>> one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    >>> going on.

    >>
    >> You mistakenly assume anyone cares about what's really going on. Histeria,
    >> and all (sorta like AGW). I had to put a system in my NY house, >20 years
    >> ago, to sell it. There was no way I'd put it in for myself.

    >
    >The thread is about pipes.
    >
    >Would you care if someone forced you to smoke two packs of cigarettes a day
    >?
    >That's what's happening if I didn't install fan.


    Of course that all depends on the severity and where the radon is measured. In
    my case it was varying between 4 and 12 pCi/l in the basement. I would never
    have spent $1200 (in '93 money) on it for us. OTOH, my brother's house was
    almost glowing (120 pCi/l, IIRC).
     
    , Jun 26, 2012
    #19
  20. hr(bob)

    gregz Guest

    "" <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 01:29:12 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:
    >
    >> "" <> wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 26 Jun 2012 00:27:30 +0000 (UTC), gregz <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> George <> wrote:
    >>>>> On 6/25/2012 11:43 AM, Retired wrote:
    >>>>>> On 6/25/12 10:46 AM, George wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 6/25/2012 9:53 AM, wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Jun 25, 9:42 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 09:16:58 -0700 (PDT), ""
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> On Jun 24, 11:25 am, Pat <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 14:52:55 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) "
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>> On Jun 23, 10:12 am, Retired <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> On 6/22/12 11:15 PM, hr(bob) wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> I'm wondering why radon vent pipes have to be at least the
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> height of
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> the house to which they are attached. As long as the output of
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> pipe is under pressure from the fan, I don't see why the vent
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> pipe
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> cannot end just at the outside surface of the house, as long
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> as it is
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> not an area where people congregate. Like behind a big evergreen
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> where the evergreen is close enough to the house that no one
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> could
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> even get there. The height should not make it draw better,
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> there are
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> no sparks to worry about, so what's the reason?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> FWIW, mine was installed using aluminum rain gutter downspout
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> pipe,
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> instead of PVC, from the fan to roof line. Not quite so
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> obvious, and
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> easily painted same color as siding.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> One thing I've wondered about. Why no rain cap, does the fan
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> have a
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> rain diverter built-in ??
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> I have a neighbor who has a radon vent without a cap and it
    >>>>>>>>>>>> fills with
    >>>>>>>>>>>> debris. She isn't too happy!!!
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> Having a cap does not guarantee no water or debris. Water can easily
    >>>>>>>>>>> condense as the temperature changes. So, the fan needs to handle
    >>>>>>>>>>> water regardless and to return to the original question, maybe the
    >>>>>>>>>>> pipe should be higher to avoid debris from trees.- Hide quoted
    >>>>>>>>>>> text -
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Yes, about 75 ft high should avoid most trees. Any more practical
    >>>>>>>>>> tips?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> One doesn't need to avoid "most" trees. One only needs to avoid the
    >>>>>>>>> trees in your particular installation. My vent is above the roof line
    >>>>>>>>> per code and that happens to be above the nearby small trees. If it
    >>>>>>>>> was at the roof line, it would not be. The OP asked why the vent
    >>>>>>>>> needed to be higher. I gave one *possible* reason. My main point was
    >>>>>>>>> why it is not necessary to keep rain water out. - Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Obviously the concept of a simple rain/debris cap
    >>>>>>>> escapes you
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I think that they do know about those ideas and wondered why the usual
    >>>>>>> radon remediation exhaust looks like this:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://inspectapedia.com/BestPractices/Figure7-8s.jpg
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I wonder if he/she is a hippie?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That's fine for new construction, but a retrofit on an older home
    >>>>>> usually looks like this:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://www.coloradohazard.com/images/radon-mitigation-system-3.jpg
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> (FWIW, while Googling for this image, I saw none with rain caps, and a
    >>>>>> few did not go past roof line !!)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think the old work version in your image is basically the new work
    >>>>> version mounted on the outside. They install around here them just
    >>>>> like your image shows.
    >>>>
    >>>> I installed mine inside. Ran from planned basement wall up through bathroom
    >>>> closet, one story. This guy did a good job, except probably no need for
    >>>> large diameter pipes. I used 2.5 inch, to 5 inch fan. Of course, hardly no
    >>>> one mentions you have to measure radon for a YEAR, before you know what's
    >>>> going on.
    >>>
    >>> You mistakenly assume anyone cares about what's really going on. Histeria,
    >>> and all (sorta like AGW). I had to put a system in my NY house, >20 years
    >>> ago, to sell it. There was no way I'd put it in for myself.

    >>
    >> The thread is about pipes.
    >>
    >> Would you care if someone forced you to smoke two packs of cigarettes a day
    >> ?
    >> That's what's happening if I didn't install fan.

    >
    > Of course that all depends on the severity and where the radon is measured. In
    > my case it was varying between 4 and 12 pCi/l in the basement. I would never
    > have spent $1200 (in '93 money) on it for us. OTOH, my brother's house was
    > almost glowing (120 pCi/l, IIRC).


    I did not see much difference between basement and upper floor. I sent
    fliers out to others on street. Pretty much didn't care. I measured
    neighbors newly built house, and it was elevated, but not like my 60 year
    house. I got into measuring it and trying to remedy situation when I sold a
    house. It measured just over at the time. They wanted it fixed. I did some
    sealing, and hired another measurement, and it passed. They still wanted
    the money.

    Greg
     
    gregz, Jun 26, 2012
    #20
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