Guardsman fabric protection

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by s0lstice, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. s0lstice

    s0lstice Guest

    Hello all,
    We've just taken delivery of a cane conservatory suite. We paid for
    the seat cushions and scatter cushions to be Scotchgarded. In the
    event they have apparently be treated at the manufacturers with
    Guardsman. I was surprised when I tested with a drop of tap-water that
    all the cushions behaved like blotting paper - no beading, just
    absorbed straight in. I obviously would rather not test with something
    that might stain.

    The guarantee certificate is apparently 'on the way'. In the meantime,
    any comments on my tap-water test? Have I been stitched-up?
    s0lstice, Jul 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. s0lstice wrote:
    > Hello all,
    > We've just taken delivery of a cane conservatory suite. We paid for
    > the seat cushions and scatter cushions to be Scotchgarded. In the
    > event they have apparently be treated at the manufacturers with
    > Guardsman.


    Two trade names for what 'should' be almost the same product. Scotchguard
    is the 3M product that has become the generic name for flurocarbon fabric
    protection.

    > I was surprised when I tested with a drop of tap-water that
    > all the cushions behaved like blotting paper - no beading, just
    > absorbed straight in. I obviously would rather not test with something
    > that might stain.


    That doesn't sound right at all. I ran a carpet cleaning company a few
    years ago and the way to sell fabric protector to Mrs Houswife is by
    demonstration. I used to carry pieces of kitchen paper, half sprayed with
    protector - you couldnt see which half was treated. Pouring the dregs of a
    cup of coffee (or even water) over the paper gave a startling result, soaked
    into the untreated half, beaded up on the treated piece.

    > The guarantee certificate is apparently 'on the way'. In the meantime,
    > any comments on my tap-water test? Have I been stitched-up?


    I reckon so, I've never come across a fabric protector, even the old
    silicone based ones, that didn't 'bead'. If water soaked in, then so will
    anything else.

    I'd get them round to demonstrate.


    --
    Dave - The Medway Handyman
    www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
    The Medway Handyman, Jul 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. s0lstice

    s0lstice Guest

    On Jul 11, 5:57 pm, "The Medway Handyman"
    <> wrote:
    > s0lstice wrote:
    > > Hello all,
    > > We've just taken delivery of a cane conservatory suite. We paid for
    > > the seat cushions and scatter cushions to be Scotchgarded. In the
    > > event they have apparently be treated at the manufacturers with
    > >Guardsman.

    >
    > Two trade names for what 'should' be almost the same product.  Scotchguard
    > is the 3M product that has become the generic name for flurocarbon fabric
    > protection.
    >
    > > I was surprised when I tested with a drop of tap-water that
    > > all the cushions behaved like blotting paper - no beading, just
    > > absorbed straight in. I obviously would rather not test with something
    > > that might stain.

    >
    > That doesn't sound right at all.  I ran a carpet cleaning company a few
    > years ago and the way to sell fabric protector to Mrs Houswife is by
    > demonstration.  I used to carry pieces of kitchen paper, half sprayed with
    > protector - you couldnt see which half was treated.  Pouring the dregs of a
    > cup of coffee (or even water) over the paper gave a startling result, soaked
    > into the untreated half, beaded up on the treated piece.
    >
    > > The guarantee certificate is apparently 'on the way'. In the meantime,
    > > any comments on my tap-water test? Have I been stitched-up?

    >
    > I reckon so, I've never come across a fabric protector, even the old
    > silicone based ones, that didn't 'bead'.  If water soaked in, then so will
    > anything else.
    >
    > I'd get them round to demonstrate.
    >
    > --
    > Dave - The Medway Handymanwww.medwayhandyman.co.uk


    Thanks for the reply Dave.

    The dealer has finally admitted that no protection has been applied to
    the fabric. Apparently, the manufacturer stopped doing it 'some time
    ago' because it 'compromises the fireproofing of upholstered
    furniture'. At least we are getting a refund, so I can compromise it
    myself.
    s0lstice, Jul 29, 2009
    #3
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