Gas cooker bayonet fitting - how hard is it to get the right angle?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Jón Fairbairn, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. To forestall any thoughts that I might be talking about
    doing this myself, I'm not. So it's OT, but I'm sure someone
    here will know:

    While we had some friends staying in our flat, the gas
    cooker was condemned, so we had to have it replaced at a
    time when we were away, fitted by someone from the vendor.
    When we got back to it, aside from the usual pieces of
    brassware discarded under cabinets and so on, what stood out
    was that the cooker stuck out further than it should. The
    back of the cooker has two "feet" to space it off the wall
    (one of them has been bent upwards, which hardly inspires
    confidence) and there is a fair distance between these and
    the wall. Closer inspection reveals that this is because the
    hose connector isn't vertical.

    If you picture the gas pipe running horizontally parallel to
    the wall, the bayonet connector forms a right angle, one arm
    of which should be vertical, but instead is angled out from
    the wall, making the hose arrangement take up more space
    than it should. So far as I could see by peering down the
    back of the cooker, there is a threaded part soldered onto
    the supply pipe and the bayonet fitting screws into this.
    So, finally, to my question: is it difficult to fit these
    things so that the hose comes out vertical? How big a job is
    it for someone to put it right?

    Apologies for the verbosity, but I'm not too awake right
    now.

    --
    Jón Fairbairn
    http://www.chaos.org.uk/~jf/Stuff-I-dont-want.html (updated 2010-09-14)
     
    Jón Fairbairn, Apr 5, 2011
    #1
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  2. Jón Fairbairn

    YAPH Guest

    Re: Gas cooker bayonet fitting - how hard is it to get the rightangle?

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 10:11:00 +0100, Jón Fairbairn wrote:

    > finally, to my question: is it difficult to fit these things so that the
    > hose comes out vertical? How big a job is it for someone to put it
    > right?


    If I'm visualising this correctly it depends whether the pipe up to the
    bayonet can be sprung away as it'll probably be necessary to unscrew the
    bayonet connector, clean/check the threads and apply fresh PTFE tape,
    thread-sealing cord or jointing compound, then screw it back in leaving
    it set at a suitable angle. Just twisting it in situ could result in the
    joint leaking.


    --
    John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

    militant pacifist
     
    YAPH, Apr 5, 2011
    #2
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  3. Re: Gas cooker bayonet fitting - how hard is it to get the rightangle?

    On 2011-04-05, YAPH <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 05 Apr 2011 10:11:00 +0100, Jón Fairbairn wrote:
    >
    >> finally, to my question: is it difficult to fit these things so that the
    >> hose comes out vertical? How big a job is it for someone to put it
    >> right?

    >
    > If I'm visualising this correctly it depends whether the


    copper?

    > pipe up to the bayonet can be sprung away


    from the wall? Probably. I'm not there at the moment, so I
    can't check.

    > as it'll probably be necessary to unscrew the bayonet
    > connector, clean/check the threads and apply fresh PTFE
    > tape, thread-sealing cord or jointing compound, then screw
    > it back in leaving it set at a suitable angle. Just
    > twisting it in situ could result in the joint leaking.


    Yes, I expected that part. What I don't quite follow is how
    one can reliably get a good seal with the bayonet in a
    particular orientation -- I guess you don't have to screw it
    in all the way, but fill any space with thread-sealer or
    what have you?

    But anyway, I get the impression that it's a fairly short
    job, so someone qualified should be able to do it without
    charging the earth.

    Thanks.

    --
    Jón Fairbairn
    http://www.chaos.org.uk/~jf/Stuff-I-dont-want.html (updated 2010-09-14)
     
    Jón Fairbairn, Apr 6, 2011
    #3
  4. Jón Fairbairn

    YAPH Guest

    Re: Gas cooker bayonet fitting - how hard is it to get the rightangle?

    On Wed, 06 Apr 2011 09:23:02 +0100, Jón Fairbairn wrote:

    > Yes, I expected that part. What I don't quite follow is how one can
    > reliably get a good seal with the bayonet in a particular orientation --
    > I guess you don't have to screw it in all the way, but fill any space
    > with thread-sealer or what have you?


    If using (suitable) jointing paste it's gooey enough to seal provided the
    joint's done up fairly snug, and tends to harden over time setting the
    joint tighter. PTFE tape (gas approved, thicker, unsintered) requires you
    to screw as far as it'll go leaving it at the right orientation, which'll
    generally be pretty tight (since the threads are tapered). Locktite
    thread sealing cord likewise but if you get the right amount of thread on
    you can get it pretty damn tight, and if you find you've turned too far
    you can back it off to the desired orientation.





    --
    John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

    DEATH TO FANATICS!
     
    YAPH, Apr 6, 2011
    #4
  5. Re: Gas cooker bayonet fitting - how hard is it to get the rightangle?

    On 2011-04-06, YAPH <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 06 Apr 2011 09:23:02 +0100, Jón Fairbairn wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, I expected that part. What I don't quite follow is how one can
    >> reliably get a good seal with the bayonet in a particular orientation --
    >> I guess you don't have to screw it in all the way, but fill any space
    >> with thread-sealer or what have you?

    >
    > If using (suitable) jointing paste it's gooey enough to seal provided the
    > joint's done up fairly snug, and tends to harden over time setting the
    > joint tighter. PTFE tape (gas approved, thicker, unsintered) requires you
    > to screw as far as it'll go leaving it at the right orientation, which'll
    > generally be pretty tight (since the threads are tapered). Locktite
    > thread sealing cord likewise but if you get the right amount of thread on
    > you can get it pretty damn tight, and if you find you've turned too far
    > you can back it off to the desired orientation.


    Interesting. Thanks.

    --
    Jón Fairbairn
    http://www.chaos.org.uk/~jf/Stuff-I-dont-want.html (updated 2010-09-14)
     
    Jón Fairbairn, Apr 7, 2011
    #5
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