For Drilling Holes In Tree Stumps

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by brojack77@my-deja.com, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. Guest

    The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the
    stumps.

    Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
     
    , Jun 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. RB Guest

    I've done this and it's a PITA. A good sized ships auger, 3/4" to 1" in
    diameter and at least 6 to 8" in length. I used a 1/2" drill. I doubt
    that the typical battery powered drill will do the job with less than 4
    to 6 recharges.

    Even after you drill the holes and place chemicals in the holes you're
    looking at several years for the stump to decompose.

    A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium
    or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will
    self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is
    nothing else combustible nearby.

    RB

    wrote:
    > The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the
    > stumps.
    >
    > Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    > battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
     
    RB, Jun 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Chris Lewis Guest

    According to RB <>:
    > I've done this and it's a PITA. A good sized ships auger, 3/4" to 1" in
    > diameter and at least 6 to 8" in length. I used a 1/2" drill. I doubt
    > that the typical battery powered drill will do the job with less than 4
    > to 6 recharges.


    You'd be surprised. An ordinary 12V Dewalt drill can do in the neighborhood of 40
    holes thru full 2" thick lumber with a 7/8" auger before recharging.

    I've also used the same drill/bit to drill series of holes in fenceposts.
    Also no problem.

    The better quality battery units are quite amazing.
    --
    Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
    It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
     
    Chris Lewis, Jun 3, 2004
    #3
  4. davefr Guest

    I'd go about 6-8" deep with a 1/2" or larger bit (preferably auger)
    using an electric drill.

    Then I fill the holes with diesel and give it about 15 minutes to
    saturate the stump. Repeat once more than lite it.

    After a few days there won't be a stump.

    Don't do it if the surrounding area is "at risk" of also catching on
    fire.

    Another method is to cover the stump with charcoal and lite it. The
    charcoal will burn out the stump.

    () wrote in message news:<>...
    > The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the
    > stumps.
    >
    > Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    > battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
     
    davefr, Jun 3, 2004
    #4
  5. Have you actually done the nitrate bit? I've wondered how
    well that works. I used to use potassium nitrate for making
    fireworks.

    I've heard some where that you can load the holes with
    powdered milk -- that's supposed to speed up the rot. I've
    never tried that.

    --

    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    www.mormons.com


    "RB" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with
    potassium
    or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground
    and it will
    self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that
    there is
    nothing else combustible nearby.

    RB
     
    Stormin Mormon, Jun 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Chet Hayes Guest

    Or you could just do the most logical and easy thing, rent a stump grinder
     
    Chet Hayes, Jun 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Sporkman Guest

    RB wrote:
    >...(clip)...
    > A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium
    > or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will
    > self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is
    > nothing else combustible nearby.


    Pardon me, as I'm not an explosives expert, but don't nitrates and fuel
    oil make a pretty potent *bang* when you light it? Or do you need
    something like a blasting cap to create a real explosion?

    Along the same lines of thought, though, one could use thermite. A five
    gallon bucket with a quart or gallon bucket inside it. Load sand around
    the quart or gallon bucket inside the bigger bucket -- prevents radial
    spread of the extreme heat generated. Thermite (aluminum powder with
    iron oxide) in the smaller central bucket. Light it off with a LONG
    magnesium strip.
     
    Sporkman, Jun 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Pen Guest

    Pen, Jun 4, 2004
    #8
  9. ken Guest

    Grew up on an apple ranch and when I was just a little tyke, Uncle
    Richard would just dig a hole down next to the stump, wire up a stick or
    two next to it, walk way far away, and blow the stump out.......the good
    old days!!!
     
    ken, Jun 4, 2004
    #9
  10. RB Guest

    Stormin Mormon wrote:
    > Have you actually done the nitrate bit? I've wondered how
    > well that works. I used to use potassium nitrate for making
    > fireworks.
    >

    Yes. Works well. There are commercial products sold for this purpose
    that are nothing more than KNO3.

    RB

    > I've heard some where that you can load the holes with
    > powdered milk -- that's supposed to speed up the rot. I've
    > never tried that.
    >
     
    RB, Jun 4, 2004
    #10
  11. RB Guest

    Sporkman wrote:
    > RB wrote:
    >
    >>...(clip)...
    >>A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium
    >>or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will
    >>self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is
    >>nothing else combustible nearby.

    >
    >
    > Pardon me, as I'm not an explosives expert, but don't nitrates and fuel
    > oil make a pretty potent *bang* when you light it? Or do you need
    > something like a blasting cap to create a real explosion?


    They will in a confined space but this is not confined so they just burn
    or smolder.

    >
    > Along the same lines of thought, though, one could use thermite. A five
    > gallon bucket with a quart or gallon bucket inside it. Load sand around
    > the quart or gallon bucket inside the bigger bucket -- prevents radial
    > spread of the extreme heat generated. Thermite (aluminum powder with
    > iron oxide) in the smaller central bucket. Light it off with a LONG
    > magnesium strip.


    I thought that the only real purpose for thermite was to "weld" chamber
    pots under John Harvard's seated statue in the Harvard Yard. ;-)

    RB
     
    RB, Jun 4, 2004
    #11
  12. RB Guest

    That would work well but today it isn't politically correct.

    RB

    ken wrote:
    > Grew up on an apple ranch and when I was just a little tyke, Uncle
    > Richard would just dig a hole down next to the stump, wire up a stick or
    > two next to it, walk way far away, and blow the stump out.......the good
    > old days!!!
    >
     
    RB, Jun 4, 2004
    #12
  13. Evan Mann Guest

    The stuff I got at home depot says to drill 1" wide, 12" deep, and then make
    a sideways hole at a downward angle that joins the straight down hole in the
    stump. I just drilled 3 or 4 straight down holes using a 1" wood spade bit,
    about 8" deep. My tree stump was something hard, so I used a corded
    milwaukee 1/2" drill. I started with my 18V Bosch, but I knew that would
    die quickly because of the hardness of the stump

    "" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the
    > stumps.
    >
    > Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    > battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
    >
     
    Evan Mann, Jun 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Chet Hayes Guest

    davefr <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > $1.00 worth of diesel or $75 rental fee + 2 round trips to the rental
    > yard.
    >
    > Sounds like a no-brainer to me!!
    >
    > On 3 Jun 2004 18:55:38 -0700, (Chet Hayes)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Or you could just do the most logical and easy thing, rent a stump grinder



    Yeah, $1.00 worth of diesel, a couple days spent watching and tending
    it while trying to burn it, getting permits for an outdoor fire or
    paying the resulting fines in most municipalities, worrying that the
    fire may spread somewhere else, then finally renting the stump grinder
    when it won't burn away.
     
    Chet Hayes, Jun 4, 2004
    #14
  15. SteveB Guest

    "RB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Sporkman wrote:
    > > RB wrote:
    > >
    > >>...(clip)...
    > >>A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium
    > >>or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will
    > >>self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is
    > >>nothing else combustible nearby.

    > >
    > >
    > > Pardon me, as I'm not an explosives expert, but don't nitrates and fuel
    > > oil make a pretty potent *bang* when you light it? Or do you need
    > > something like a blasting cap to create a real explosion?

    >


    With explosives, you must reach the speed of detonation to have an
    explosion. Explosives are rated in feet per second, that is, a
    mathematically arrived at figure where you could lay out ten miles of the
    stuff, and time it from one end to the other. Black powder is slower,
    hence, you have seen the trail of gunpowder lit by the bank robbers and all
    snaking its way along. Something like 500 fps. That is low order. High
    order is in the 24,000 fps and up range.

    Many high explosives will burn and not explode. C4 plastic explosive was
    commonly burned in small food stoves in Viet Nam.

    A story is told in "Yankee Autumn in Acadiana", an account of the Civil War
    movement of the North fighting the South as it progressed through southern
    Louisiana. A particularly loony soldier would commonly use an unexploded
    "Parrott" shell as a cook surface by building a fire next to it. These were
    16" in diameter. He would turn it flat side up. Other soldiers would stay
    away from his camp. He said it would not ignite. He was wrong, and one
    night, it did with him cooking dinner. He was never seen again.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Jun 4, 2004
    #15
  16. SteveB Guest

    "Chet Hayes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > davefr <> wrote in message

    news:<>...
    > > $1.00 worth of diesel or $75 rental fee + 2 round trips to the rental
    > > yard.
    > >
    > > Sounds like a no-brainer to me!!
    > >
    > > On 3 Jun 2004 18:55:38 -0700, (Chet Hayes)
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >Or you could just do the most logical and easy thing, rent a stump

    grinder
    >
    >
    > Yeah, $1.00 worth of diesel, a couple days spent watching and tending
    > it while trying to burn it, getting permits for an outdoor fire or
    > paying the resulting fines in most municipalities, worrying that the
    > fire may spread somewhere else, then finally renting the stump grinder
    > when it won't burn away.


    They WILL burn away. They WILL decay away. It just depends how long you
    want to wait.

    Steve
     
    SteveB, Jun 4, 2004
    #16
  17. Chris Lewis Guest

    According to RB <>:

    > Sporkman wrote:
    > > RB wrote:


    > >>...(clip)...
    > >>A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium
    > >>or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will
    > >>self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is
    > >>nothing else combustible nearby.


    > > Pardon me, as I'm not an explosives expert, but don't nitrates and fuel
    > > oil make a pretty potent *bang* when you light it? Or do you need
    > > something like a blasting cap to create a real explosion?


    > They will in a confined space but this is not confined so they just burn
    > or smolder.


    Sporkman is thinking ANFO.

    Ammonium Nitrate (fertilizer) and fuel oil is a true explosive, and will
    go kaboom without confinement - but it does need a cap to initiate.

    Otherwise known as "ANFO". The US govt (used to) publish pamphlets with
    instructions for farmers how to make the stuff to blow up stumps. The
    mining industry (and certain road building) uses it extensively. Drill
    holes in the rock, tanker truck pumps in pre-mixed ANFO, set blasting cap,
    and boom!

    Sodium/Potassium nitrate plus fuel oil isn't a true explosive - burns rather
    than explodes.

    Should be considered with caution, because below-ground fires can
    be _extremely_ nasty to put out, and pop up hundreds of yards
    from where you set them.

    > > Along the same lines of thought, though, one could use thermite. A five
    > > gallon bucket with a quart or gallon bucket inside it. Load sand around
    > > the quart or gallon bucket inside the bigger bucket -- prevents radial
    > > spread of the extreme heat generated. Thermite (aluminum powder with
    > > iron oxide) in the smaller central bucket. Light it off with a LONG
    > > magnesium strip.


    While this is fun to do, I think the heat production is way too short-duration
    to be much use with a stump.

    > I thought that the only real purpose for thermite was to "weld" chamber
    > pots under John Harvard's seated statue in the Harvard Yard. ;-)


    Welding large castings, rails, etc... ;-)
    --
    Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
    It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
     
    Chris Lewis, Jun 4, 2004
    #17
  18. "Ignoramus32760" <ignoramus32760@NOSPAM.32760.invalid> wrote in message
    news:c9pu2k$4fh$...
    >
    > i
    >
    > In article <TSZvc.59566$>, Evan Mann

    wrote:
    > > The stuff I got at home depot says to drill 1" wide, 12" deep, and then

    make
    > > a sideways hole at a downward angle that joins the straight down hole in

    the
    > > stump. I just drilled 3 or 4 straight down holes using a 1" wood spade

    bit,
    > > about 8" deep. My tree stump was something hard, so I used a corded
    > > milwaukee 1/2" drill. I started with my 18V Bosch, but I knew that

    would
    > > die quickly because of the hardness of the stump
    > >
    > > "" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the
    > >> stumps.
    > >>
    > >> Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    > >> battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
    > >>

    > >
    > >


    > And what chemical would destroy the stump?


    Potassium nitrate.

    --

    SVL
     
    PrecisionMachinisT, Jun 4, 2004
    #18
  19. "Ignoramus32760" <ignoramus32760@NOSPAM.32760.invalid> wrote in message
    news:c9q8n7$58e$...
    > In article <>, PrecisionMachinisT wrote:
    > >
    > > "Ignoramus32760" <ignoramus32760@NOSPAM.32760.invalid> wrote in message
    > > news:c9pu2k$4fh$...
    > >>
    > >> i
    > >>
    > >> In article <TSZvc.59566$>, Evan Mann

    > > wrote:
    > >> > The stuff I got at home depot says to drill 1" wide, 12" deep, and

    then
    > > make
    > >> > a sideways hole at a downward angle that joins the straight down hole

    in
    > > the
    > >> > stump. I just drilled 3 or 4 straight down holes using a 1" wood

    spade
    > > bit,
    > >> > about 8" deep. My tree stump was something hard, so I used a corded
    > >> > milwaukee 1/2" drill. I started with my 18V Bosch, but I knew that

    > > would
    > >> > die quickly because of the hardness of the stump
    > >> >
    > >> > "" <> wrote in message
    > >> > news:...
    > >> >> The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down

    the
    > >> >> stumps.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a
    > >> >> battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >

    > >
    > >> And what chemical would destroy the stump?

    > >
    > > Potassium nitrate.
    > >

    >
    > and where could I buy it?
    >


    Hardware store, plant nursery, or at the home and garden dept at many
    variety stores--labeled as "Stump Remover"--read the label, diesel or other
    hydrocarbon fuel will help if you intend to later burn the stump.

    Bulk quantities are available at wholesale chemical houses and pyrotechnic
    materials suppliers........

    Beware, stump removal grade is *not* generally not pure enough for
    pyrotechnic use, so suggest dont get any bright ideas about making
    explosives or other 4th of July demonstrations with it.

    Enuff said ???

    --

    SVL
     
    PrecisionMachinisT, Jun 4, 2004
    #19
  20. "escapee" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 4 Jun 2004 16:41:11 GMT, Ignoramus32760

    <ignoramus32760@NOSPAM.32760.invalid>
    > opined:
    >
    >
    > >and where could I buy it?
    > >
    > >i

    >
    > All you need is any cheap bag of high nitrogen fertilizer. Try not to get

    it on
    > anything but the stump you are trying to decay. In addition to the

    nitrogen
    > fertilizer, also put about a five pound bag of sugar on the stump to seep

    into
    > the holes you drill. The carbon in the sugar will help expedite the

    process
    >
    >


    Yup....

    In composting of woody material, nitrogen is needed--if not available in the
    form of green clippings it can be always be added in chemical form.

    Not sure about the sugar though, as in this case there is already plenty of
    carbon in the stump.

    --

    SVL
     
    PrecisionMachinisT, Jun 4, 2004
    #20
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