Fixing Celotex to walls

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Stephen Gilkes, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. Hi there

    Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and
    have got a couple of questions:

    The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex
    and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to
    the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to
    put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do this?
    If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line up
    the batten with the holes.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    thing.

    Stephen
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. Stephen Gilkes

    MrCheerful Guest

    "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi there
    >
    > Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and
    > have got a couple of questions:
    >
    > The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex
    > and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to
    > the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to
    > put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do

    this?
    > If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line

    up
    > the batten with the holes.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    > thing.
    >
    > Stephen
    >
    >


    I would glue it on.

    MrCheerful
    MrCheerful, Feb 16, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Stephen Gilkes

    Andy Hall Guest

    On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 16:36:04 -0000, "Stephen Gilkes"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi there
    >
    >Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and
    >have got a couple of questions:
    >
    >The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex
    >and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to
    >the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to
    >put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do this?
    >If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line up
    >the batten with the holes.
    >
    >Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    >thing.
    >
    >Stephen
    >


    I think that a lot depends on what you want to use the shed for and
    whether you want to fix things to the battens or to clad it in ply or
    something.

    If you don't really need to fix anything to it, then you might as well
    skip the screws and simply stick the cladding to the wall with
    Gripfill. You could then stick a thin ply to the front if you want
    to protect it slightly.

    If you want something slightly more substantial, then you could do as
    you are suggesting. Simply use a long masonry drill and drill through
    the Celotex into the wall. You can then remove the sheet and insert
    the plugs. Replace the sheet and carefully locate the screws through
    the battens and the sheet. The problem with this method is that it
    won't support very much if you are trying to do that because the
    Celotex will tend to crush if you overtighten the fixings and in any
    case mechanically speaking you will have the battens effectively stood
    off from the wall on screws by the thickness of the Celotex - it won't
    give any support. Therefore it is not going to be a good method if
    you are looking to fit heavy shelves.

    I insulated my single brick garage using Celotex by first making stud
    framing in 75x50mm timber. The rectangular sections produced were
    bolted to the floor using Rawlbolts and to the joists using carriage
    screws. The rear face of the timber was spaced off from the wall by
    about 25mm. The Celotex was cut and friction fitted into the frames
    and then the joints taped with foil tape that they supply. Finally,
    I clad the framing with 18mm ply. Having the timber framing spaced
    off from the wall prevents cold bridging from the wall (although it
    does allow some with the floor). An alternative would have been to
    bolt the timbers directly to the wall but this would have bridged the
    insulation - not necessarily that big a deal in a shed, although you
    wouldn't do it in a dwelling. The cladding means that I can fit
    light to medium weight things anywere on the walls with no hassle and
    for heavier things I have very substantial studs at 600mm intervals.

    For the roof I didn't need to fix anything to it, so I used long
    drywall screws with large washers to fix the Celotex to the rafters.


    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
    Andy Hall, Feb 16, 2004
    #3
  4. Stephen Gilkes

    MrCheerful Guest

    "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi there
    >
    > Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and
    > have got a couple of questions:
    >
    > The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex
    > and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to
    > the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to
    > put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do

    this?
    > If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line

    up
    > the batten with the holes.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    > thing.
    >
    > Stephen
    >
    >


    If you want to put plaster board over the celotex, then you could first fix
    uprights to the wall, fill between with celotex, then plasterboard over the
    whole lot. This would give you some solid bits to fix things to. It is
    also possible to get plasterboard already fixed to celotex.

    MrCheerful
    MrCheerful, Feb 16, 2004
    #4
  5. Stephen Gilkes

    Steve Guest

    Stephen Gilkes wrote:
    > Hi there
    >
    > Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and
    > have got a couple of questions:
    >
    > The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex
    > and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to
    > the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to
    > put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do this?
    > If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line up
    > the batten with the holes.
    >
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    > thing.
    >
    > Stephen
    >
    >

    There are some nice "knock-in" fastners from Rawlplug et al. Just drill
    through the batten, into the wall and then NAIL the batten on. The
    "nail" is a screw like thingy which can be tightened further once it is
    on the wall. Very quick and also very strong.

    Don't forget the sealing tape stuff too.,

    Steve
    Steve, Feb 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Stephen Gilkes

    Sploop Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote in message
    news:403123b3$0$19406$...
    > Stephen Gilkes wrote:
    > > Hi there
    > >
    > > Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex

    and
    > > have got a couple of questions:
    > >
    > > The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the

    Celotex
    > > and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens

    to
    > > the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need

    to
    > > put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do

    this?
    > > If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line

    up
    > > the batten with the holes.
    > >
    > > Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of
    > > thing.
    > >
    > > Stephen
    > >
    > >

    > There are some nice "knock-in" fastners from Rawlplug et al. Just drill
    > through the batten, into the wall and then NAIL the batten on. The
    > "nail" is a screw like thingy which can be tightened further once it is
    > on the wall. Very quick and also very strong.
    >
    > Don't forget the sealing tape stuff too.,#




    Forget the lot use thermoboard, which is plasterboard with 30/40/50 mm
    insulation bonded. £17 an 8x4 sheet fix with drywall adhesive.£4.75 a 25kg
    bag. Bingo finish in one. Standard requirement on newbuild exterior walls.
    >
    > Steve
    Sploop, Feb 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Stephen Gilkes

    Andrew Guest

    Andy Hall <> wrote in message news:<>...
    >
    > I insulated my single brick garage using Celotex by first making stud
    > framing in 75x50mm timber. The rectangular sections produced were
    > bolted to the floor using Rawlbolts and to the joists using carriage
    > screws. The rear face of the timber was spaced off from the wall by
    > about 25mm. The Celotex was cut and friction fitted into the frames
    > and then the joints taped with foil tape that they supply. Finally,
    > I clad the framing with 18mm ply. Having the timber framing spaced
    > off from the wall prevents cold bridging from the wall (although it
    > does allow some with the floor). An alternative would have been to
    > bolt the timbers directly to the wall but this would have bridged the
    > insulation - not necessarily that big a deal in a shed, although you
    > wouldn't do it in a dwelling. The cladding means that I can fit
    > light to medium weight things anywere on the walls with no hassle and
    > for heavier things I have very substantial studs at 600mm intervals.
    >


    Andy,

    I want to do something similar and had wondered why you used the
    framing method (found in the archive). Now I understand.

    Do I need ventilation for the airgap behind the celotex?

    Is there another airgap between the celotex and the plywood or do you
    fit the celotex flush with the outer face of the battens?

    The celotex app notes also suggests using it to insulate the floor
    with a covering of flooring grade chipboard. Anyone done this?

    Andrew
    Andrew, Feb 17, 2004
    #7
  8. Stephen Gilkes

    Andy Hall Guest

    On 17 Feb 2004 01:50:42 -0800, (Andrew)
    wrote:

    >Andy Hall <> wrote in message news:<>...
    >>
    >> I insulated my single brick garage using Celotex by first making stud
    >> framing in 75x50mm timber. The rectangular sections produced were
    >> bolted to the floor using Rawlbolts and to the joists using carriage
    >> screws. The rear face of the timber was spaced off from the wall by
    >> about 25mm. The Celotex was cut and friction fitted into the frames
    >> and then the joints taped with foil tape that they supply. Finally,
    >> I clad the framing with 18mm ply. Having the timber framing spaced
    >> off from the wall prevents cold bridging from the wall (although it
    >> does allow some with the floor). An alternative would have been to
    >> bolt the timbers directly to the wall but this would have bridged the
    >> insulation - not necessarily that big a deal in a shed, although you
    >> wouldn't do it in a dwelling. The cladding means that I can fit
    >> light to medium weight things anywere on the walls with no hassle and
    >> for heavier things I have very substantial studs at 600mm intervals.
    >>

    >
    >Andy,
    >
    >I want to do something similar and had wondered why you used the
    >framing method (found in the archive). Now I understand.
    >
    >Do I need ventilation for the airgap behind the celotex?


    It's probably a good idea. As a general principle, putting wood in a
    potentially damp and unventilated space is not a good plan. Because
    of the construction of my garage, I was able to incorporate
    ventilation quite easily. The overhang of the roof provides quite
    generous horizontal soffits under the eaves. The roof uses trussed
    frames similar to house construction. I fitted Celotex to the
    inner surface of the rafters - I could have fitted some between and
    some on top, but it was enough of a PITA to fit the stuff up there
    anyway that I didn't mind losing about 50mm of depth up there.
    This created a space behind the depth of the rafters to ventilate the
    them. I then boarded on top of the joists to form a storage area but
    only up to the roof Celotex. The wall framing was arranged so that
    there was an air gap at the top meeting the gap behind the roof
    Celotex. I then fitted soffit vents into the soffits between each
    pair of rafters on both sides of the (apex) roof.
    This gives a ventilated space common behind roof and walls.

    I did a simple test using smoke matches held against holes cut in the
    final wall on a mildly windy day. It was blown in and out, so I
    think that the ventilation is effective enough.

    An alternative would be to chop an air brick into the wall, I suppose.

    For belt and braces, I used pressure treated timber for the framing as
    well. A good and cheap source of this is a timber mill that makes
    fencing materials, although it can be obtained at a normal merchant.

    >
    >Is there another airgap between the celotex and the plywood or do you
    >fit the celotex flush with the outer face of the battens?


    No. The Celotex is fitted flush with the front surface of the
    framing. I then taped it using the metalised tape, to cover the
    joins from sheet to sheet and to the battens. In a few places where
    there were small holes and gaps as a result of the garage
    construction, I used foam filler.

    I then fitted the ply to the framing using drywall screws and painted
    it.


    >
    >The celotex app notes also suggests using it to insulate the floor
    >with a covering of flooring grade chipboard. Anyone done this?


    I debated the idea. The problem for me is that the height from
    floor to joists is only about 2400mm and I didn't want to lose any of
    that. Also, I will want to move heavy things in and out on occasions
    so I don't really want a step at the front.

    I had done the heat loss calculations for the building and the floor
    was the least of the losses. Now of course it's the most, but not
    substantial.




    >
    >Andrew


    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
    Andy Hall, Feb 17, 2004
    #8
  9. At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?



    "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in message
    news:4030f6c2$0$10339$...
    > > Should I use screws or masonry nails?

    >
    >
    > Predrill holes in all the battens first.
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Thanks Mate!

    "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in message
    news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?

    >
    > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall,
    > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5 or 6

    in
    > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    >
    > Christian.
    >
    >
    >
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 17, 2004
    #10
  11. The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm blunting
    drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but the dust
    is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so tough!

    My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?

    "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in message
    news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?

    >
    > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall,
    > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5 or 6

    in
    > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    >
    > Christian.
    >
    >
    >
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 17, 2004
    #11
  12. Stephen Gilkes

    MrCheerful Guest

    "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm

    blunting
    > drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but the dust
    > is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so tough!
    >
    > My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?
    >
    > "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in message
    > news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?

    > >
    > > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall,
    > > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5 or 6

    > in
    > > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    > >
    > > Christian.
    > >

    Buy an sds drill and bits.

    MrCheerful
    MrCheerful, Feb 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Stephen Gilkes

    T i m Guest

    On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 09:19:37 -0000, "Christian McArdle"
    <> wrote:

    >> Forget the lot use thermoboard, which is plasterboard with 30/40/50 mm
    >> insulation bonded. +AKM-17 an 8x4 sheet fix with drywall adhesive.+AKM-4.75 a
    >> 25kg bag. Bingo finish in one.

    >
    >For a shed, though, it might be more appropriate to use plywood instead of
    >(or in addition to) plasterboard, as it is much easier to fix shelving and
    >racking to.
    >
    >Christian.
    >


    I turned a pre-fab 20' x 10' concrete garage into a GP workshop and
    wanted to line the inside with something warm, strong and easy to fix
    things to. The 'problem' was the inside of the garage was very
    'paneled' with a 1 1/2" 'dish' in the panels.

    I cut up a load 4 x 2 (sawn) into 6" long blocks and 'Gripfilled' them
    to the inside walls at 3 heights (top. middle and bottom) and 2'
    spacing. I then lined the whole lot with bubble pack and used ally 'H'
    section strips to lock 12m WBP (is it?) ply panels together at the
    joints and screwed to the wooden blocks.

    The whole lot was painted with some light grey floor paint and (second
    hand) Spur uprights (full height) fitted at 2' intervals around all
    the walls (picking up on the glued blocks). This means I can put
    shelves pretty well anywhere and the ply is strong enough for brackets
    or small draw units in between.

    The steel trussed, corrugated cement fibre, ridge type roof is a bit
    of a low pitch for any real 'loft' storage. I've not done anything to
    that yet but I might fabricate some taller trusses and re-roof it at
    some time soon? I think I can go up to 3m high without needing
    planning permission (the workshop is 8' 6" at the eaves). I was also
    considering some of that triple walled polycarbonate sheet to give me
    more light or maybe an odd corrugated clear H/D panel if I stick with
    that style?

    The std 8' square up-and-over door was not much fun (especially in the
    winter) so I fabricated a triple traditional door set (out of 50 x 25
    x 1.5 mm steel box tube clad in steel sheet) to give a single 1/3 rd
    wide 6' 6" high personal door and the other 2/3 rds are a sort of
    bi-fold allowing the whole thing to open up if needed.

    It all took quite a while to do but makes for a great hidy hole for
    'fettling' stuff ;-)

    All the best ..

    T i m
    T i m, Feb 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Whats an SDS drill?

    I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.


    "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    news:WEtYb.1228$...
    >
    > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm

    > blunting
    > > drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but the

    dust
    > > is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so

    tough!
    > >
    > > My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?
    > >
    > > "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in message
    > > news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?
    > > >
    > > > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall,
    > > > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5 or

    6
    > > in
    > > > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > > > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    > > >
    > > > Christian.
    > > >

    > Buy an sds drill and bits.
    >
    > MrCheerful
    >
    >
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 17, 2004
    #14
  15. Stephen Gilkes

    T i m Guest

    On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 23:55:40 -0000, "Stephen Gilkes"
    <> wrote:

    >> > >

    >> Buy an sds drill and bits.
    >>
    >> MrCheerful
    >>


    >Whats an SDS drill?
    >
    >I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.
    >
    >


    [T] I'm not sure what it stands for but it's a 'system'.

    A std 'hammer' drill works by having a searies of 'ramps' on one of
    the drive gears causing the bit to move backward and forward slightly
    as it goes round. They generally have a standard or hand chucks.

    An SDS 'tool' (as they don't just drill) use a different method to
    create the percussion and the q/r chuck takes a range of 'bits'
    including chisels etc and could be thought of as similar to a tiny
    Kango? They can be used as a std rotary drill, drill with hammer or
    just the hammer action (bit not rotating) . The bits have flutes on
    them where they go into the chuck so they don't slip.

    I think there are different std's (I'm new to all this myself) eg you
    can get SDS and SDS II etc?

    They range in price from +AKM-29 to hundreds for something that will work
    all day (if you can lift one all day that is!).

    Great for getting ceramic tiles of the wall I'm told?

    All the best ..

    T i m
    T i m, Feb 18, 2004
    #15
  16. Stephen Gilkes

    MrCheerful Guest

    "T i m" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 09:19:37 -0000, "Christian McArdle"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >> Forget the lot use thermoboard, which is plasterboard with 30/40/50 mm
    > >> insulation bonded. £17 an 8x4 sheet fix with drywall adhesive.£4.75 a
    > >> 25kg bag. Bingo finish in one.

    > >
    > >For a shed, though, it might be more appropriate to use plywood instead

    of
    > >(or in addition to) plasterboard, as it is much easier to fix shelving

    and
    > >racking to.
    > >
    > >Christian.
    > >

    >
    > I turned a pre-fab 20' x 10' concrete garage into a GP workshop and
    > wanted to line the inside with something warm, strong and easy to fix
    > things to. The 'problem' was the inside of the garage was very
    > 'paneled' with a 1 1/2" 'dish' in the panels.
    >
    > I cut up a load 4 x 2 (sawn) into 6" long blocks and 'Gripfilled' them
    > to the inside walls at 3 heights (top. middle and bottom) and 2'
    > spacing. I then lined the whole lot with bubble pack and used ally 'H'
    > section strips to lock 12m WBP (is it?) ply panels together at the
    > joints and screwed to the wooden blocks.
    >
    > The whole lot was painted with some light grey floor paint and (second
    > hand) Spur uprights (full height) fitted at 2' intervals around all
    > the walls (picking up on the glued blocks). This means I can put
    > shelves pretty well anywhere and the ply is strong enough for brackets
    > or small draw units in between.
    >
    > The steel trussed, corrugated cement fibre, ridge type roof is a bit
    > of a low pitch for any real 'loft' storage. I've not done anything to
    > that yet but I might fabricate some taller trusses and re-roof it at
    > some time soon? I think I can go up to 3m high without needing
    > planning permission (the workshop is 8' 6" at the eaves). I was also
    > considering some of that triple walled polycarbonate sheet to give me
    > more light or maybe an odd corrugated clear H/D panel if I stick with
    > that style?
    >
    > The std 8' square up-and-over door was not much fun (especially in the
    > winter) so I fabricated a triple traditional door set (out of 50 x 25
    > x 1.5 mm steel box tube clad in steel sheet) to give a single 1/3 rd
    > wide 6' 6" high personal door and the other 2/3 rds are a sort of
    > bi-fold allowing the whole thing to open up if needed.
    >
    > It all took quite a while to do but makes for a great hidy hole for
    > 'fettling' stuff ;-)
    >
    > All the best ..
    >
    > T i m
    >
    >


    Sounds nice. Local byelaws may be different but 4 metres is usual for max
    height

    MrCheerful.
    MrCheerful, Feb 18, 2004
    #16
  17. Stephen Gilkes

    MrCheerful Guest

    "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Whats an SDS drill?
    >
    > I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.
    >
    >
    > "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    > news:WEtYb.1228$...
    > >
    > > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm

    > > blunting
    > > > drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but the

    > dust
    > > > is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so

    > tough!
    > > >
    > > > My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?
    > > >
    > > > "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in

    message
    > > > news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > > > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?
    > > > >
    > > > > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall,
    > > > > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5

    or
    > 6
    > > > in
    > > > > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > > > > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    > > > >
    > > > > Christian.
    > > > >

    > > Buy an sds drill and bits.
    > >
    > > MrCheerful
    > >


    If you have a chuck that you tighten onto the drill, then you do not have an
    sds drill. SDS drills and bits are a godsend to any serious diy or building
    work, they have a special chuck that holds the drill bit with two sliding
    pieces on the sides, a hammer goes in and out to physically smash the
    floating drill bit into the wall. There is never a problem with
    retightening drill bits, there is only a few moments of actually drilling,
    the drills never get blunt or wear out (in practical terms)

    Screwfix have a very nice offer on an erbaur sds drill at the moment:

    86109 £79.99
    you will need the appropriate bits too.

    You will never regret buying an sds drill, I am certain.

    MrCheerful
    MrCheerful, Feb 18, 2004
    #17
  18. Thanks for all the info.

    It seems that the bricks used to build the shed are (according to a friend)
    cheap bricks that are absolute nightmare to drill into. They're much more
    hard than usual housebricks. Hopefully an SDS drill will do the business.

    So I cant just fix into the pug joints?


    "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    news:1eyYb.1515$...
    >
    > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Whats an SDS drill?
    > >
    > > I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.
    > >
    > >
    > > "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    > > news:WEtYb.1228$...
    > > >
    > > > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm
    > > > blunting
    > > > > drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but

    the
    > > dust
    > > > > is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so

    > > tough!
    > > > >
    > > > > My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?
    > > > >
    > > > > "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in

    > message
    > > > > news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > > > > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the

    wall,
    > > > > > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put

    5
    > or
    > > 6
    > > > > in
    > > > > > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > > > > > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Christian.
    > > > > >
    > > > Buy an sds drill and bits.
    > > >
    > > > MrCheerful
    > > >

    >
    > If you have a chuck that you tighten onto the drill, then you do not have

    an
    > sds drill. SDS drills and bits are a godsend to any serious diy or

    building
    > work, they have a special chuck that holds the drill bit with two sliding
    > pieces on the sides, a hammer goes in and out to physically smash the
    > floating drill bit into the wall. There is never a problem with
    > retightening drill bits, there is only a few moments of actually drilling,
    > the drills never get blunt or wear out (in practical terms)
    >
    > Screwfix have a very nice offer on an erbaur sds drill at the moment:
    >
    > 86109 £79.99
    > you will need the appropriate bits too.
    >
    > You will never regret buying an sds drill, I am certain.
    >
    > MrCheerful
    >
    >
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 18, 2004
    #18
  19. Stephen Gilkes

    PoP Guest

    On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 00:21:17 GMT, "MrCheerful" <>
    wrote:

    >You will never regret buying an sds drill, I am certain.


    Unless for his first job he offers it up to a wall made of soft
    materials in order to drill a little hole for a rawlplug. Then two
    seconds later he's got a new doorway to walk through ;)

    PoP

    -----

    My published email address probably won't work. If
    you need to contact me please submit your comments
    via the web form at http://www.anyoldtripe.co.uk

    I apologise for the additional effort, however the
    level of unsolicited email I receive makes it
    impossible to advertise my real email address!
    PoP, Feb 18, 2004
    #19
  20. Would this SDS drill be OK? - Its £93.98 from B&Q

    Bosch PBH 240 RE
    Rotary Hammer and Chiselling Machine
    Power Input: 600W
    Chuck size: SDS 13mm (1/2") Keyless
    No Load Speed: 0-800rpm
    Drilling capacity: in concrete 22mm, in masonry 50mm with a core
    Electro pneumatic hammer produces a massive 2.2 Joule impact force
    For drilling in concrete & chiselling in masonry
    Up to 4600 powerful hammer blows per minute
    Bosch Electronic Speed Control: Variable speed pre-selection & smooth
    acceleration form 0 to max
    Forward & reverse action
    Carrying case, SDS chuck, SDS chisel & 1 x 5, 6 & 8mm SDS drill bits




    "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    news:1eyYb.1515$...
    >
    > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Whats an SDS drill?
    > >
    > > I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.
    > >
    > >
    > > "MrCheerful" <> wrote in message
    > > news:WEtYb.1228$...
    > > >
    > > > "Stephen Gilkes" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm
    > > > blunting
    > > > > drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but

    the
    > > dust
    > > > > is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so

    > > tough!
    > > > >
    > > > > My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?
    > > > >
    > > > > "Christian McArdle" <> wrote in

    > message
    > > > > news:4031fb5c$0$10337$...
    > > > > > > At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the

    wall,
    > > > > > avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put

    5
    > or
    > > 6
    > > > > in
    > > > > > spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a
    > > > > > brick/block, to avoid damage.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Christian.
    > > > > >
    > > > Buy an sds drill and bits.
    > > >
    > > > MrCheerful
    > > >

    >
    > If you have a chuck that you tighten onto the drill, then you do not have

    an
    > sds drill. SDS drills and bits are a godsend to any serious diy or

    building
    > work, they have a special chuck that holds the drill bit with two sliding
    > pieces on the sides, a hammer goes in and out to physically smash the
    > floating drill bit into the wall. There is never a problem with
    > retightening drill bits, there is only a few moments of actually drilling,
    > the drills never get blunt or wear out (in practical terms)
    >
    > Screwfix have a very nice offer on an erbaur sds drill at the moment:
    >
    > 86109 £79.99
    > you will need the appropriate bits too.
    >
    > You will never regret buying an sds drill, I am certain.
    >
    > MrCheerful
    >
    >
    Stephen Gilkes, Feb 18, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

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