Fitting A Loft Ladder

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Andrew McKay, Jul 14, 2003.

  1. Andrew McKay

    Andrew McKay Guest

    Just looking for general advice with the following, fitting the loft
    ladder isn't a problem.

    A client has asked me to fit a loft ladder. No big deal. But I
    understand that the loft hatch is possibly one of those new fangled
    jobs which is a thin plastic tray filled with polystyrene. I've got
    one of those in my own house :)

    With typical loft ladders you are supposed to add hinges and arrange
    the hatch so that it swings down, away from the ceiling, so that the
    loft ladder can be pulled down.

    Anyone got any suggestions about how you arrange this with one of
    those modern loft doors?

    Andrew

    Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
    web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
    Andrew McKay, Jul 14, 2003
    #1
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  2. Andrew McKay

    Andrew McKay Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 12:00:53 GMT, "BigWallop"
    <spamguard@_spam_guard_.com> wrote:

    >http://www.gcdewey.co.uk/html/loft_ladders.html


    You've been a busy boy :)

    It's not the fitting of a loft ladder that is the issue, it's the
    rather flimsy loft hatch that needs to be modified (or potentially
    replaced). Just wondered if anyone had had any success with a loft
    trapdoor which defied simple modification :)

    Andrew

    Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
    web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
    Andrew McKay, Jul 14, 2003
    #2
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  3. Andrew McKay

    BigWallop Guest

    "Andrew McKay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 12:00:53 GMT, "BigWallop"
    > <spamguard@_spam_guard_.com> wrote:
    >
    > >http://www.gcdewey.co.uk/html/loft_ladders.html

    >
    > You've been a busy boy :)
    >
    > It's not the fitting of a loft ladder that is the issue, it's the
    > rather flimsy loft hatch that needs to be modified (or potentially
    > replaced). Just wondered if anyone had had any success with a loft
    > trapdoor which defied simple modification :)
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    Hi Andrew,

    I know you can get a concertina style ladder that extends to about 2.5 mtrs,
    I think it's shown on one of the links, that fits between two of the main
    joists and doesn't really need anything more special than hinges fitted to
    keep the hatch cover from falling away from the opening. This give freedom
    to hinge the cover one way and pull the ladder down from the opposite side.
    It may be one to look out for.


    ---
    BigWallop

    http://basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.500 / Virus Database: 298 - Release Date: 10/07/03
    BigWallop, Jul 14, 2003
    #3
  4. Andrew McKay

    John Guest

    I"Andrew McKay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just looking for general advice with the following, fitting the loft
    > ladder isn't a problem.
    >
    > A client has asked me to fit a loft ladder. No big deal. But I
    > understand that the loft hatch is possibly one of those new fangled
    > jobs which is a thin plastic tray filled with polystyrene. I've got
    > one of those in my own house :)
    >
    > With typical loft ladders you are supposed to add hinges and arrange
    > the hatch so that it swings down, away from the ceiling, so that the
    > loft ladder can be pulled down.
    >
    > Anyone got any suggestions about how you arrange this with one of
    > those modern loft doors?
    >
    > Andrew


    If I understand correctly what you are saying. I have done this three
    times. Remove the hatch door and surround (usually held with 2 screws
    per side into the joists). Use suitable timber (eg. 4" x 1" PSE) to
    line the opening. Make good the ceiling opening by means of mitred
    architrave or similar and carry on as normal making the hinged down
    door etc.

    HTH

    John
    John, Jul 14, 2003
    #4
  5. Andrew McKay

    Andy Hall Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 12:41:37 +0100, Andrew McKay
    <> wrote:

    >Just looking for general advice with the following, fitting the loft
    >ladder isn't a problem.
    >
    >A client has asked me to fit a loft ladder. No big deal. But I
    >understand that the loft hatch is possibly one of those new fangled
    >jobs which is a thin plastic tray filled with polystyrene. I've got
    >one of those in my own house :)
    >
    >With typical loft ladders you are supposed to add hinges and arrange
    >the hatch so that it swings down, away from the ceiling, so that the
    >loft ladder can be pulled down.
    >
    >Anyone got any suggestions about how you arrange this with one of
    >those modern loft doors?
    >


    Have a look at this type of ladder.

    http://tinyurl.com/gw27


    This is one example, and there are several other manufacturers of this
    folding idea. Basically they differ in price by size, features and
    quality.

    I fitted one of the Lux types a few years ago and it works well.

    I had previously had one of the plastic tray affairs and with that had
    replaced the tray with a piece of ply hinged to drop down and then a
    catch to secure it. An aluminium loft ladder could then be pulled
    forward and down. However it was never satisfactory and the ladder
    wasted a lot of space.

    I figured out that by the time I had messed around with making and
    fitting a suitable casing to improve it, it was easier, quicker and
    cheaper to just buy the whole thing ready to go. Plus the function
    and operation is better than can be achieved from making something.

    Fitting these is a doddle. Basically you remove the old hatch and
    extend the cut out in the plasterboard. Most ladders of this type
    have a casing which matches the joist pitch.
    I then removed the ladder from the casing assembly to make it easier
    to lift. I fitted some 100mm wide battens between the joists as
    temporary support, flush with the ceiling. I lifted the casing into
    the loft and dropped it into place. It needed a couple of packing
    pieces but then it's simply a matter of screwing through the sides of
    the casing into the joists. The battens can then be removed and the
    ladder fitted. Finally, the ceiling can be neatened with some
    architrave mitred for the job.

    A wooden ladder is much more comfortable to climb than an aluminium
    one and a lot more stable. The extra weight is handled by the gas
    struts very effectively. You also get a properly sealed and
    insulated cover and the other big advantage is that it all folds up
    within the footprint of the casing

    ..andy

    To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
    Andy Hall, Jul 14, 2003
    #5
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