Exterior Wood filler

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by IMM, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. IMM

    IMM Guest

    I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity has
    appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by replacing
    a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I use
    to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?
     
    IMM, Feb 17, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. IMM

    Grunff Guest

    IMM wrote:
    > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity has
    > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by replacing
    > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I use
    > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?


    Car body filler (styrene resin filled with either aluminium or polymer
    powder) will do a good job of sticking to pretty much anything as long
    as it's dry. You can subsequently sand and fill it.

    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Feb 17, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. IMM

    IMM Guest

    "Michael McNeil" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "IMM" <> wrote in message
    > news:c0rml2$7oj$
    >
    > > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity

    has
    > > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by

    replacing
    > > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I

    use
    > > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?

    >
    > Is this a joke or are you even more of a tit than I thought?


    Do you mean I should not use a filler? How strange!
     
    IMM, Feb 17, 2004
    #3
  4. IMM

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <c0rml2$7oj$>,
    IMM <> wrote:
    > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity
    > has appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by
    > replacing a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of
    > filler could I use to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone
    > have any ideas?


    And I thought you lived in a modern super insulated house. Something else
    you've made up?

    For a repair to only last a few months, I'd use mortar.
    Car body filler - Isopon etc - is better, but not worth the expense for
    such a short time.

    --
    *See no evil, Hear no evil, Date no evil.

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 17, 2004
    #4
  5. IMM

    Grouch Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:c0roh0$hp0$...
    >
    > "Michael McNeil" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > "IMM" <> wrote in message
    > > news:c0rml2$7oj$
    > >
    > > > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity

    > has
    > > > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by

    > replacing
    > > > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could

    I
    > use
    > > > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?

    > >
    > > Is this a joke or are you even more of a tit than I thought?

    >
    > Do you mean I should not use a filler? How strange!
    >
    >


    =============================
    If you read his posting properly you will see the light. ;o)

    Get some dry wall plaster this goes hard as nails but rember to paint over
    it
     
    Grouch, Feb 17, 2004
    #5
  6. IMM wrote:

    > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity has
    > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by replacing
    > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I use
    > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Car body filler if painting afterwards.

    Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then
    treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both
    eem to bind soft fi=bers together.

    When that lot has set, slap on two part polyester resind mix =- P38 or
    chemical metal are the usual 'brands' - shape as good as you can with a
    poutty knofe, allow to half set (5 mins) then sand like firey as once
    set rockhard it takes forever to sand down.

    That will outlast any wooden frame you have left by aboutt 100 years.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Feb 17, 2004
    #6
  7. IMM

    IMM Guest

    "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity

    has
    > > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by

    replacing
    > > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I

    use
    > > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?

    >
    > Car body filler if painting afterwards.
    >
    > Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then
    > treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both
    > eem to bind soft fi=bers together.


    ???

    > When that lot has set, slap on two part polyester resind mix =- P38 or
    > chemical metal are the usual 'brands' - shape as good as you can with a
    > poutty knofe, allow to half set (5 mins) then sand like firey as once
    > set rockhard it takes forever to sand down.
    >
    > That will outlast any wooden frame you have left by aboutt 100 years.
     
    IMM, Feb 17, 2004
    #7
  8. IMM

    stuart noble Guest

    Dave Plowman wrote in message <>...
    >Car body filler - Isopon etc - is better, but not worth the expense for
    >such a short time.

    Cheap from trade outlets. £10 for 3.5kgs with 4 tubes of hardener.
     
    stuart noble, Feb 17, 2004
    #8
  9. IMM

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <STnYb.166$>,
    stuart noble <stuart'> wrote:
    > >Car body filler - Isopon etc - is better, but not worth the expense for
    > >such a short time.


    > Cheap from trade outlets. £10 for 3.5kgs with 4 tubes of hardener.


    And a handful of sand and cement costs...?

    --
    *24 hours in a day ... 24 beers in a case ... coincidence? *

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 17, 2004
    #9
  10. IMM

    PoP Guest

    On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 00:24:17 +0000 (UTC), "Michael McNeil"
    <> wrote:

    >Is this a joke or are you even more of a tit than I thought?


    Put it this way, if there were two of him then Jordan would feel
    intimidated.

    PoP

    -----

    My published email address probably won't work. If
    you need to contact me please submit your comments
    via the web form at http://www.anyoldtripe.co.uk

    I apologise for the additional effort, however the
    level of unsolicited email I receive makes it
    impossible to advertise my real email address!
     
    PoP, Feb 17, 2004
    #10
  11. IMM

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > > I have an old sash window that has just shown signs of rot. A cavity

    has
    > > appeared in the wood frame. This will have to be done properly by

    replacing
    > > a section of the frame in the summer or so. What type of filler could I

    use
    > > to see it through the next 6 to 9 months? Anyone have any ideas?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Car body filler if painting afterwards.
    >
    > Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then
    > treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both
    > eem to bind soft fi=bers together.


    Whatever you do, don't sniff the glue - it plays havoc with your keyboard
    skills :eek:)
    >
    > When that lot has set, slap on two part polyester resind mix =- P38 or
    > chemical metal are the usual 'brands' - shape as good as you can with a
    > poutty knofe, allow to half set (5 mins) then sand like firey as once


    Mind you "sand like firey" has a certain ring of truth about it!


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     
    Bob Mannix, Feb 17, 2004
    #11
  12. IMM

    stuart noble Guest

    Dave Plowman wrote in message <>...
    >In article <STnYb.166$>,
    > >And a handful of sand and cement costs...?

    Bugger all and, as a wood filler, you would get what you had paid for.
     
    stuart noble, Feb 17, 2004
    #12
  13. IMM

    Pete C Guest

    Hi,

    Car filler is not necessarily a good idea, sometimes the 'filler'
    ingredient is talc which is quite porous. Also car filler isn't very
    flexible so may pull away from the wood as it shrinks when the weather
    gets drier.

    For a temporary repair fill the cavity with expanding foam, sand the
    foam flat then tape over it with aluminium tape and paint over that.
    It's also worth treating the hole in the frame with wood preserver to
    minimise further rot.

    For a more permenant repair first chisel the rotten wood away to good
    leaving a clean regular shaped hole. Then cut a piece of similar wood
    to fill the hole as neatly as possible but slightly proud to the
    surrounding frame, and treat the wood and the frame with preserver.
    When dry glue the wood fillet in with a good polyurethane
    adhesive/sealant such as Sikaflex 221, and when that has set sand the
    new wood flush to the frame.

    Hope this helps,
    Pete.
     
    Pete C, Feb 17, 2004
    #13
  14. IMM

    Dave Plowman Guest

    In article <6stYb.354$>,
    stuart noble <stuart'> wrote:

    > > >And a handful of sand and cement costs...?


    > Bugger all and, as a wood filler, you would get what you had paid for.


    Since it's only got to last a few months I can't see the point in spending
    money. Perhaps you've got more than me. So saying, IMM is good at spending
    other's money, so perhaps I should be recommending a gold inlay.

    --
    *You! Off my planet!

    Dave Plowman London SW 12
    RIP Acorn
     
    Dave Plowman, Feb 17, 2004
    #14
  15. "IMM" <> wrote in message
    news:c0sr9p$fke$...
    >
    > "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then
    > > treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both
    > > eem to bind soft fi=bers together.

    >
    > ???


    Cuprinol wood hardener?

    Michael Chare
     
    Michael Chare, Feb 17, 2004
    #15
  16. IMM

    IMM Guest

    "Michael Chare" <> wrote in message
    news:c0tvv6$m26$...
    > "IMM" <> wrote in message
    > news:c0sr9p$fke$...
    > >
    > > "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then
    > > > treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both
    > > > eem to bind soft fi=bers together.

    > >
    > > ???

    >
    > Cuprinol wood hardener?


    Is that what all that says?
     
    IMM, Feb 17, 2004
    #16
  17. IMM

    Grunff Guest

    Pete C wrote:

    > Car filler is not necessarily a good idea, sometimes the 'filler'
    > ingredient is talc which is quite porous. Also car filler isn't very
    > flexible so may pull away from the wood as it shrinks when the weather
    > gets drier.


    I don't know what car filler you've been using, but it's *nothing* like
    anything I've ever used.

    The resin is normally styrene, and the filler is almost always either
    polymer or aluminium. It's very flexible, and never shrinks.


    > For a temporary repair fill the cavity with expanding foam, sand the
    > foam flat then tape over it with aluminium tape and paint over that.
    > It's also worth treating the hole in the frame with wood preserver to
    > minimise further rot.


    Have you ever actually tried sanding foam??? I have...


    --
    Grunff
     
    Grunff, Feb 17, 2004
    #17
  18. IMM

    Pete C Guest

    On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 22:12:51 +0000, Grunff <> wrote:

    >Pete C wrote:
    >
    >> Car filler is not necessarily a good idea, sometimes the 'filler'
    >> ingredient is talc which is quite porous. Also car filler isn't very
    >> flexible so may pull away from the wood as it shrinks when the weather
    >> gets drier.

    >
    >I don't know what car filler you've been using, but it's *nothing* like
    >anything I've ever used.
    >
    >The resin is normally styrene, and the filler is almost always either
    >polymer or aluminium.


    I was thinking of more common body fillers like Isopon p38. Looking at
    the MHDS:

    http://www.u-pol.com/countries/en/downloads/hsds/isoponbodyfillerrange.pdf

    it reads:

    "4. Mineral filler (which is a constituent of most body fillers), "in
    excessive quantities", is considered a moderate
    risk and, therefore, it is advisable to provide proper working
    methods/machinery to minimise the risk."

    Sounds like talc to me, as a polymer or metal is not a mineral. Talc
    is an ideal constituent for filler as it's cheap and easy to sand. A
    polymer would react with the styrene, or melt and clog the sandpaper
    whilst sanding, and aluminium would be an absolute b*tch to sand
    down!!!

    >It's very flexible, and never shrinks.


    Sorry I meant the wood itself shrinks and expands due to changes in
    humidity throughout the seasons. Car body filler is only slightly
    flexible and has fairly poor adhesion to wood if it gets damp and/or
    moves due to humidity changes, so will separate from the wood over
    time. Car body filler is fine for interior use though.

    >
    >> For a temporary repair fill the cavity with expanding foam, sand the
    >> foam flat then tape over it with aluminium tape and paint over that.
    >> It's also worth treating the hole in the frame with wood preserver to
    >> minimise further rot.

    >
    >Have you ever actually tried sanding foam??? I have...


    No, what sort of foam was it and how did you sand it? I would have
    thought a belt or random orbital sander would do well enough. Cutting
    it with a sharp knife might be another alternative, it isn't the
    hardest material to shape.

    cheers,
    Pete.
     
    Pete C, Feb 18, 2004
    #18
  19. IMM

    Guest

    Pete C <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 22:12:51 +0000, Grunff <> wrote:
    >
    > >Pete C wrote:
    > >
    > >> Car filler is not necessarily a good idea, sometimes the 'filler'
    > >> ingredient is talc which is quite porous. Also car filler isn't very
    > >> flexible so may pull away from the wood as it shrinks when the weather
    > >> gets drier.

    > >
    > >I don't know what car filler you've been using, but it's *nothing* like
    > >anything I've ever used.
    > >
    > >The resin is normally styrene, and the filler is almost always either
    > >polymer or aluminium.

    >
    > I was thinking of more common body fillers like Isopon p38. Looking at
    > the MHDS:
    >
    > http://www.u-pol.com/countries/en/downloads/hsds/isoponbodyfillerrange.pdf
    >
    > it reads:
    >
    > "4. Mineral filler (which is a constituent of most body fillers), "in
    > excessive quantities", is considered a moderate
    > risk and, therefore, it is advisable to provide proper working
    > methods/machinery to minimise the risk."
    >
    > Sounds like talc to me, as a polymer or metal is not a mineral. Talc


    Er, um, I think you'll find that metals are most definitely mineral,
    they certainly aren't animal or vegetable.


    --
    Chris Green
     
    , Feb 18, 2004
    #19
  20. IMM

    stuart noble Guest

    Dave Plowman wrote in message <>...
    >Since it's only got to last a few months I can't see the point in spending
    >money. Perhaps you've got more than me.

    And this from a man who owns a house in Balham. I thought you lot were all
    millionaires :)
     
    stuart noble, Feb 18, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Kyle Boatright

    Re: exterior wood filler

    Kyle Boatright, Feb 26, 2006, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,652
    BobK207
    Feb 26, 2006
  2. Robert11

    Wood Filler For Exterior Wood Patching ?

    Robert11, Mar 4, 2007, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    661
    C & E
    Mar 4, 2007
  3. abby
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    285
    John Grabowski
    Jul 26, 2008
  4. Existential Angst

    Epoxy repair/filler for exterior wood.

    Existential Angst, Aug 9, 2011, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    721
    Existential Angst
    Aug 14, 2011
  5. George

    exterior wood filler?

    George, Aug 26, 2012, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    219
    George
    Aug 30, 2012
Loading...

Share This Page