Ensuite Japanese-style bathroom, over garage

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by bluphysted@hotmail.com, May 31, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Mates,

    I've just purchased my first home and have some wild plans of
    installing a 'Japanese-Style' bathroom.

    I have a few family members who are carpenters, and overall handy guys,
    but I thought I'd thought Id give a shout out to see if anyone here
    could offer any suggestion, books, warnings, etc on the topic.


    Currently, the home has a garage that extends from the front of first
    floor of the two storey home. The master bedroom looks down onto the
    garage roof. My hopes were to bash a hole in my bedroom wall, tear off
    the roof of the garage, replace the current ceiling joists of the
    garage with some beefy floor joists, and basically build a second level
    onto the garage with an entrance from the master bedroom.

    A Japanese bathroom is constructed so that everything is meat to be
    wet. You wash yourself while standing, or sitting on a small stool,
    using a handheld shower head, and/or a spout in the wall, before
    splashing into the over-sized tub (the tub isnt meant for washing).
    With all this wet in mind, I'll have to do some extensive
    waterproofing. I imagine more so than the average western bathroom.

    My immediate concerns is how to qualify the garage to support the load
    of a large tub of water. On top of the weight of a large tub of water,
    I'll probably use some rather heavy tiles on the floors and walls. The
    garage is brick, but Im not entirely sure these things are built with
    the structure of possibly having a second storey one day.


    Anyways, obviously this may be a rather grand do-it-yourself task for
    someone who's never had the chance to do something like this before...
    but if anyone could suggest any material that would be helpful for me,
    I'd greatly appreciate the advice.
     
    , May 31, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    "How do I know the garage walls will support the loads I intend to
    impose?"ight
    Right?
    One can start from either end of the problem, but in the end, the loads
    must be calculated and the soil bearing capacity, foundation, and wall
    must be examined.
    A structural engineer would be a good investment, once you know what
    and where you want to add to the second floor. The engineer would be a
    help in designing the second floor frame and in designing connections
    to the existing home. I see it as a few hundreds to avoid damages of a
    few thousand and the resustant time and misery.

    I looked at a case simiilar to the one you describe. A large whirl pool
    tub for two, large shower, multi bowl lavatory counter, toilet, and
    bidet = all using stone flooring, counters, tub platform and tile walls
    had been added to the second floor an existing house. The owner wanted
    to know why the corner of his house sagged and bowed out.

    TB
     
    , May 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    wrote:
    > "How do I know the garage walls will support the loads I intend to
    > impose?"ight
    > Right?
    > One can start from either end of the problem, but in the end, the loads
    > must be calculated and the soil bearing capacity, foundation, and wall
    > must be examined.
    > A structural engineer would be a good investment, once you know what
    > and where you want to add to the second floor. The engineer would be a
    > help in designing the second floor frame and in designing connections
    > to the existing home. I see it as a few hundreds to avoid damages of a
    > few thousand and the resustant time and misery.
    >
    > I looked at a case simiilar to the one you describe. A large whirl pool
    > tub for two, large shower, multi bowl lavatory counter, toilet, and
    > bidet = all using stone flooring, counters, tub platform and tile walls
    > had been added to the second floor an existing house. The owner wanted
    > to know why the corner of his house sagged and bowed out.
    >
    > TB



    Thanks, I had this idea in mind (the engineer), although I was (and
    still am) a little uncertain as to the cost of such a service.

    I appreciate the advice. I guess I'll have a stroll through the yellow
    pages. I reckon there would be some 'freelance' structural engineers
    for hire kicking around? Not that I particularily wish to cut corners,
    but keeping the cost as low as possible is a good thing (although
    keeping my garage intact, and the tub off the roof of my car would
    probably take precedence ;)
     
    , May 31, 2005
    #3
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