Emulsion and gloss - which first?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by chris French, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. chris French

    chris French Guest

    Just finished redecorating our bedroom, (a major refurb - new elcetrics,
    replastering etc.), father-in-law helped me out finish the painting on
    Saturday.

    Anyway, I've always (AFAICR) painted the woodwork first and then
    emulsioned the walls, and thought this was a fairly standard thing. FIL
    said that he always does the emulsion first and then the glosswork
    (learn from his FIL probably who was a decorator).

    anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what
    others do (and why?)
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
    chris French, Feb 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. On 23/02/2004 chris French opined:-
    > Just finished redecorating our bedroom, (a major refurb - new elcetrics,
    > replastering etc.), father-in-law helped me out finish the painting on
    > Saturday.
    >
    > Anyway, I've always (AFAICR) painted the woodwork first and then emulsioned
    > the walls, and thought this was a fairly standard thing. FIL said that he
    > always does the emulsion first and then the glosswork (learn from his FIL
    > probably who was a decorator).
    >
    > anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what others do
    > (and why?)
    > --


    The emulsion is applied with a larger brush/pad or etc. and tends to go
    over onto the gloss areas anyway, so I do the gloss after and more
    slowly.

    1. emulsion
    2. gloss
    3. papering

    --

    Regards,
    Harry (M1BYT) (L)
    http://www.ukradioamateur.org
    Harry Bloomfield, Feb 23, 2004
    #2
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  3. chris French

    Velvet Guest

    chris French wrote:

    >
    > Just finished redecorating our bedroom, (a major refurb - new elcetrics,
    > replastering etc.), father-in-law helped me out finish the painting on
    > Saturday.
    >
    > Anyway, I've always (AFAICR) painted the woodwork first and then
    > emulsioned the walls, and thought this was a fairly standard thing. FIL
    > said that he always does the emulsion first and then the glosswork
    > (learn from his FIL probably who was a decorator).
    >
    > anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what
    > others do (and why?)


    Emulsion then gloss. Spatters from the roller on emulsion bit gets on
    the gloss, I then paint the woodwork (straight over any spatters, since
    they come off as part of the woodwork prep) and it's done. And I find
    it easier to get a neat line between woodwork and wall when using the
    gloss/satin paint rather than the other way around.

    Velvet
    Velvet, Feb 23, 2004
    #3
  4. chris French

    John Forbes Guest

    > Emulsion then gloss. Spatters from the roller on emulsion bit gets on
    > the gloss, I then paint the woodwork (straight over any spatters, since
    > they come off as part of the woodwork prep) and it's done. And I find
    > it easier to get a neat line between woodwork and wall when using the
    > gloss/satin paint rather than the other way around.
    >
    > Velvet


    BUT, it's easier to wipe emulsion off (dry) gloss than to get
    oil-based gloss off emulsion ....
    BTW does anyone jnow a good book or website that gives "good"
    trade-level advice on painting??

    John Forbes
    John Forbes, Feb 24, 2004
    #4
  5. > anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what
    > others do (and why?)


    I tend to gloss afterwards - keeping the paint off wooden frames with a
    large roller is nigh to impossible. But then again, it is pretty easy to rub
    off emulsion.

    Rob
    Rob Nicholson, Feb 24, 2004
    #5
  6. chris French

    Velvet Guest

    John Forbes wrote:

    >>Emulsion then gloss. Spatters from the roller on emulsion bit gets on
    >>the gloss, I then paint the woodwork (straight over any spatters, since
    >>they come off as part of the woodwork prep) and it's done. And I find
    >>it easier to get a neat line between woodwork and wall when using the
    >>gloss/satin paint rather than the other way around.
    >>
    >>Velvet

    >
    >
    > BUT, it's easier to wipe emulsion off (dry) gloss than to get
    > oil-based gloss off emulsion ....
    > BTW does anyone jnow a good book or website that gives "good"
    > trade-level advice on painting??
    >
    > John Forbes


    True - but I paint gloss with a brush, and being a (lapsed) artist I
    have pretty good brush control, so it's very rare that gloss gets onto
    the wall where it shouldn't...

    And I don't think I really want to go round all the gloss after I've
    emulsioned and get every last speck of emulsion off it, when I'll do
    that at the gloss-prepping stage - it's one more circuit of the room
    that means the job takes longer overall - and the emulsion is SO much
    nicer to do when you can roller it on and not worry about where you're
    getting it too much :)

    Oh, I don't use masking tape either, other than along the
    skirting/carpet line (not all my carpets are take-up-able) cos I've
    never found one yet that doesn't lift one or other of the paints, so
    lots of practice freehand with a brush probable helps.

    I just don't see there's much difference - you need a neat edge to
    either the gloss or the emulsion depending on which one you do last, and
    like I said, gloss last means one less trip round the room cleaning
    emulsion off the gloss (plus, no risk of denting not yet fully hard
    gloss with a wayward roller).

    Each to their own I guess. I've never asked a trade p&d how they do it,
    be interesting to find out.

    Velvet
    Velvet, Feb 24, 2004
    #6
  7. chris French

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Velvet" <> wrote in message
    news:QfF_b.844$...
    > John Forbes wrote:
    >
    > >>Emulsion then gloss. Spatters from the roller on emulsion bit gets on
    > >>the gloss, I then paint the woodwork (straight over any spatters, since
    > >>they come off as part of the woodwork prep) and it's done. And I find
    > >>it easier to get a neat line between woodwork and wall when using the
    > >>gloss/satin paint rather than the other way around.
    > >>
    > >>Velvet

    > >
    > >
    > > BUT, it's easier to wipe emulsion off (dry) gloss than to get
    > > oil-based gloss off emulsion ....
    > > BTW does anyone jnow a good book or website that gives "good"
    > > trade-level advice on painting??
    > >
    > > John Forbes

    >
    > True - but I paint gloss with a brush, and being a (lapsed) artist I
    > have pretty good brush control, so it's very rare that gloss gets onto
    > the wall where it shouldn't...
    >
    > And I don't think I really want to go round all the gloss after I've
    > emulsioned and get every last speck of emulsion off it, when I'll do
    > that at the gloss-prepping stage - it's one more circuit of the room
    > that means the job takes longer overall - and the emulsion is SO much
    > nicer to do when you can roller it on and not worry about where you're
    > getting it too much :)
    >
    > Oh, I don't use masking tape either, other than along the
    > skirting/carpet line (not all my carpets are take-up-able) cos I've
    > never found one yet that doesn't lift one or other of the paints, so
    > lots of practice freehand with a brush probable helps.
    >
    > I just don't see there's much difference - you need a neat edge to
    > either the gloss or the emulsion depending on which one you do last, and
    > like I said, gloss last means one less trip round the room cleaning
    > emulsion off the gloss (plus, no risk of denting not yet fully hard
    > gloss with a wayward roller).
    >
    > Each to their own I guess. I've never asked a trade p&d how they do it,
    > be interesting to find out.


    People who can't paint do the gloss first as you can wipe the emulsion off
    the gloss. People who can paint do it the other way round, as you get a
    better finish line. Only you know when you have moved from the first group
    to the second (I decided I had recently). Decorators do the gloss last and
    don't usually bollocks it up. There are occasional lapses and they go round
    with a small fine brush and the emulsion tin going over any such aberrations
    before the customer sees them (as I do before SWMBO sees them). They also
    (builders more especially) tend to use the emulsion to "prime" and
    "undercoat" the wood, as it's quicker and cheaper and the customer is none
    the wiser.

    The same is true for papering/glossing as paste wipes off gloss.

    I have found the lo-tack fluorescent pink masking tape is actually lo-tack
    and doesn't pull the paint off. Doesn't stick much either though, although I
    have used it with some success. The "lo-tack" ordinary paper masking tape
    doesn't seem any different to how it's always been (ie sticks like hell to
    everything) IMHO.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
    Bob Mannix, Feb 24, 2004
    #7
  8. chris French

    RichardS Guest

    "chris French" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Just finished redecorating our bedroom, (a major refurb - new elcetrics,
    > replastering etc.), father-in-law helped me out finish the painting on
    > Saturday.
    >
    > Anyway, I've always (AFAICR) painted the woodwork first and then
    > emulsioned the walls, and thought this was a fairly standard thing. FIL
    > said that he always does the emulsion first and then the glosswork
    > (learn from his FIL probably who was a decorator).
    >
    > anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what
    > others do (and why?)


    I think that the pro rationale is all about speed and efficiency for the
    job.

    From memory, our (family) pro goes something like preparation first, then
    prime (and U/C if needed) woodwork, then ceiling/walls then final woodwork.

    Getting gloss on the walls isn't an issue - he's so fast and accurate at
    cutting in that it just doesn't happen. Emulsion splashes can be wiped off
    primed woodwork quickly after it has been primed,but if it needed to be
    removed from final coat then that would take a day to dry to the degree that
    you can get splashes off, and could affect the finish even then. By the
    time the finish coat has dried on the woodwork the emulsion splashes have
    also thoroughly hardened and become even more difficult to remove.

    Once gloss or eggshell has gone on then it is essentially dead time for him,
    so he'll aim to put one coat on late in the afternoon on the penultimate
    day, then come back for the last day to put another coat on. Then it's a
    case of closing the door and leaving it to the client to wait for it to dry.

    --
    Richard Sampson

    email me at
    richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
    RichardS, Feb 24, 2004
    #8
  9. chris French wrote:

    >
    > Just finished redecorating our bedroom, (a major refurb - new elcetrics,
    > replastering etc.), father-in-law helped me out finish the painting on
    > Saturday.
    >
    > Anyway, I've always (AFAICR) painted the woodwork first and then
    > emulsioned the walls, and thought this was a fairly standard thing. FIL
    > said that he always does the emulsion first and then the glosswork
    > (learn from his FIL probably who was a decorator).
    >
    > anyway, not that it makes a lot of difference, but I wondered what
    > others do (and why?)


    It depends on how accurate you are, and whether ther are gaps getween
    the gloss and teh emulsion.

    In my latest bathroom exploit, I used decoratours caluk everywhere, and
    emulsion foirst is the wway to go, then gloss (well eggshell) up to
    whatever point you decide on. Gloss takes to emulsion: The reverse is
    NOT true.
    The Natural Philosopher, Feb 25, 2004
    #9
  10. On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 11:01:21 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

    > Gloss takes to emulsion: The reverse is NOT true.


    Which is why I do it the otherway round. You can remove the inevitable
    spots, splashes and drips, though applying gloss is a lot less messy
    than roller applied emulsion.

    --
    Cheers
    Dave. pam is missing e-mail
    Dave Liquorice, Feb 28, 2004
    #10
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