Electrical socket screws - what size thread?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by a, Sep 13, 2004.

  1. a

    a Guest

    Anyone know off hand what size thread the screws are for securing socket
    plates to backboxes?

    cheers

    Dave.
    a, Sep 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. a

    AJ Guest

    a wrote:
    > Anyone know off hand what size thread the screws are for securing socket
    > plates to backboxes?
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > Dave.
    >
    >

    M 3.5 mm
    AJ, Sep 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. a

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 13:17:03 +0100, "a" <> wrote:

    >Anyone know off hand what size thread the screws are for securing socket
    >plates to backboxes?


    M3.5

    Pretty common, but most easily found at electrical wholesalers. They
    also sell rethreading taps with plastic handles which can be an
    absolute godsend for some repair work.

    --
    Smert' spamionam
    Andy Dingley, Sep 13, 2004
    #3
  4. a

    a Guest

    > >Anyone know off hand what size thread the screws are for securing socket
    > >plates to backboxes?

    >
    > M3.5
    >
    > Pretty common, but most easily found at electrical wholesalers. They
    > also sell rethreading taps with plastic handles which can be an
    > absolute godsend for some repair work.
    >
    > --
    > Smert' spamionam


    thanks
    a, Sep 13, 2004
    #4
  5. a

    Stefek Zaba Guest

    AJ wrote:

    >> Anyone know off hand what size thread the screws are for securing

    socket
    >> plates to backboxes?
    >>

    > M 3.5 mm


    And isn't it Strange how M3, M4, M5 etc are common-as-muck sizes sold at
    quid-or-two-gets-you-one-or-two-hundred prices, while the 3.5s having
    more or less only this application are Specialist Items selling at 5 or
    more times that price? (Well, economics of mass mfrg being what they
    are, I s'pose it's not Strange. Presumably M3.5 was the closest in
    diameter in metric sizes to the Imperial size previously used (4 BA?)
    and it was considered more important to have only the backbox threads
    and accessory screws change, leaving the holes in accessory plates
    unchanged, than to use a widely-available size...)

    Stefek
    Stefek Zaba, Sep 13, 2004
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    Stefek Zaba <> wrote:
    > And isn't it Strange how M3, M4, M5 etc are common-as-muck sizes sold at
    > quid-or-two-gets-you-one-or-two-hundred prices, while the 3.5s having
    > more or less only this application are Specialist Items selling at 5 or
    > more times that price?


    Yehbut they're raised head screws which always seem to be more expensive
    and rare. Ordinary 3.5mm pan or countersunk are easy enough to get.

    --
    *Aim Low, Reach Your Goals, Avoid Disappointment *

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 13, 2004
    #6
  7. a

    a Guest

    > > And available in a variety of lengths from 'proper'
    > > electricians' suppliers.

    >
    > 25mm - 80mm in 5mm steps across the road from here.
    >
    > --


    I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws that
    came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard longer ones I
    had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of the normal screws
    stops some plugtops going right up to the socket face. Nothing seems to be
    simple these days.
    a, Sep 13, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <4145ccc8$0$20251$>,
    a <> wrote:
    > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws
    > that came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard longer
    > ones I had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of the normal
    > screws stops some plugtops going right up to the socket face. Nothing
    > seems to be simple these days.


    Sounds like you've bought some strange accessories. What make are they?

    --
    *Gargling is a good way to see if your throat leaks.

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 13, 2004
    #8
  9. On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:13:17 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

    > Sounds like you've bought some strange accessories. What make are
    > they?


    More likely strange screws. I got some "long" screws (50mm) from
    Screwfix heads are just a tad larger than the counter bore in the
    accessories. These screws also have a nasty slot/philips combination
    head.

    --
    Cheers
    Dave. pam is missing e-mail
    Dave Liquorice, Sep 13, 2004
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    Dave Liquorice <> wrote:
    > More likely strange screws. I got some "long" screws (50mm) from
    > Screwfix heads are just a tad larger than the counter bore in the
    > accessories. These screws also have a nasty slot/philips combination
    > head.


    Ahh. Screwfix seem to specialise in sourcing their screws from strange
    suppliers.

    The only thing I can think of with non standard 3.5 mm screw heads were
    some surface mounted phone sockets - the 3/4 size ones.

    --
    *Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 13, 2004
    #10
  11. a

    N. Thornton Guest

    "a" <> wrote in message news:<4145ccc8$0$20251$>...

    > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws that
    > came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard longer ones I
    > had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of the normal screws
    > stops some plugtops going right up to the socket face. Nothing seems to be
    > simple these days.


    easily shrunk if you have an angle grinder and drill. Careful not to
    damage the threads in the chuck though.

    NT
    N. Thornton, Sep 14, 2004
    #11
  12. a

    a Guest

    > > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws
    that
    > > came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard longer ones

    I
    > > had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of the normal screws
    > > stops some plugtops going right up to the socket face. Nothing seems to

    be
    > > simple these days.

    >
    > easily shrunk if you have an angle grinder and drill. Careful not to
    > damage the threads in the chuck though.
    >
    > NT


    I thought about a grinding wheel but dont have one - never thought about
    spinning the screw though, something to try :eek:)
    a, Sep 14, 2004
    #12
  13. a

    a Guest

    > > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws
    > > that came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard longer
    > > ones I had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of the normal
    > > screws stops some plugtops going right up to the socket face. Nothing
    > > seems to be simple these days.

    >
    > Sounds like you've bought some strange accessories. What make are they?
    >


    Think they go under the name "Ultimate" or something - flat plate sockets
    from B&Q
    a, Sep 14, 2004
    #13
  14. In article <>,
    N. Thornton <> wrote:
    > > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws
    > > that came with the new sockets I bought! I have put some standard
    > > longer ones I had in for the moment but the slightly larger head of
    > > the normal screws stops some plugtops going right up to the socket
    > > face. Nothing seems to be simple these days.


    > easily shrunk if you have an angle grinder and drill. Careful not to
    > damage the threads in the chuck though.


    Apart from most screws of this type being plated. ;-)

    --
    *Work like you don't need the money. Love like you've never been hurt.

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 14, 2004
    #14
  15. In article <4146ba05$1$20250$>,
    a <> wrote:
    > > Sounds like you've bought some strange accessories. What make are they?
    > >


    > Think they go under the name "Ultimate" or something - flat plate sockets
    > from B&Q


    Perhaps the correct screws are just plain countersunk if the plate is
    shallow?

    --
    *Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity *

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 14, 2004
    #15
  16. a

    John Laird Guest

    On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:49:43 +0100, Stefek Zaba <>
    wrote:

    >Presumably M3.5 was the closest in
    >diameter in metric sizes to the Imperial size previously used (4 BA?)


    Curiously, BA sizes are in fact metric ! 4BA is 3.6mm diameter with a
    slightly larger pitch than M3.5. I've found you can use M3.5 bolts in old
    sockets, but not (obviously) the other way round. Perhaps this explains the
    odd choice of size.

    --
    I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
    John Laird, Sep 14, 2004
    #16
  17. a

    Guest

    John Laird <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:49:43 +0100, Stefek Zaba <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Presumably M3.5 was the closest in
    > >diameter in metric sizes to the Imperial size previously used (4 BA?)

    >
    > Curiously, BA sizes are in fact metric ! 4BA is 3.6mm diameter with a
    > slightly larger pitch than M3.5. I've found you can use M3.5 bolts in old
    > sockets, but not (obviously) the other way round. Perhaps this explains the
    > odd choice of size.
    >

    Yes, I've often surprised people by telling them that. I believe they
    were a Swiss standard or soemthing originally.

    --
    Chris Green
    , Sep 14, 2004
    #17
  18. a

    N. Thornton Guest

    "Dave Plowman (News)" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > In article <>,
    > N. Thornton <> wrote:
    > > > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed screws


    > > easily shrunk if you have an angle grinder and drill. Careful not to
    > > damage the threads in the chuck though.

    >
    > Apart from most screws of this type being plated. ;-)


    how does that make a difference?

    NT
    N. Thornton, Sep 14, 2004
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    N. Thornton <> wrote:
    > > > > I bet they dont do long versions of the slightly smaller headed
    > > > > screws


    > > > easily shrunk if you have an angle grinder and drill. Careful not to
    > > > damage the threads in the chuck though.

    > >
    > > Apart from most screws of this type being plated. ;-)


    > how does that make a difference?


    They're plated for a reason. Durability and looks. Remove the plating
    round the edge will probably show after a while.

    --
    *I finally got my head together, now my body is falling apart.

    Dave Plowman London SW
    To e-mail, change noise into sound.
    Dave Plowman (News), Sep 14, 2004
    #19
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