Electric space heater question

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by olddog, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. olddog

    olddog Guest

    olddog, Dec 23, 2008
    #1
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  2. olddog

    Frank Guest

    Frank, Dec 23, 2008
    #2
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  3. olddog

    olddog Guest

    "Frank" <> wrote in message
    news:giqq0k$6em$...
    > olddog wrote:
    >> We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I
    >> was using
    >> in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >>
    >> http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&topnav=&browse=&lang=en-US
    >> Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >>
    >> Olddog
    >>

    >
    > Electric heater give off carbon monoxide? LOL ;)


    I would of thought it was funny too but my detector went off and it was
    right by my space heater. Hell...I don't know. It's invisible and odorless.

    olddog
     
    olddog, Dec 23, 2008
    #3
  4. olddog

    ransley Guest

    On Dec 23, 7:40 am, "olddog" <> wrote:
    > We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I was
    > using
    > in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >
    > http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&top....
    >
    > Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >
    > Olddog


    What set it off was dust burning off, mine always stink for 15 minutes
    after a year sitting, put a plastic bag over it when you store it for
    the summer. So actualy for a minute it could have put out minimal Co,
    but it was just dust burning off.
     
    ransley, Dec 23, 2008
    #4
  5. "olddog" <> wrote:

    >Do those things put off carbon monoxide?


    No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.
     
    Robert Neville, Dec 23, 2008
    #5
  6. olddog

    ransley Guest

    On Dec 23, 9:00 am, Robert Neville <> wrote:
    > "olddog" <> wrote:
    > >Do those things put off carbon monoxide?

    >
    > No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.


    Blow cigarette smoke into a co detector, it registers, burn dust off a
    800f element it will register Co.
     
    ransley, Dec 23, 2008
    #6
  7. ransley <> wrote:

    >> No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.

    >
    >Blow cigarette smoke into a co detector, it registers,


    And cigarette smoke comes from the combustion of tobacco, not an electric heater
    element.

    >burn dust off a 800f element it will register Co.


    And if you have anything more than a momentary blip of CO from dust on the
    elements, you have bigger problems.

    The bottom line is that a normally operting electric heater does not produce CO.
     
    Robert Neville, Dec 23, 2008
    #7
  8. olddog

    Guest

    On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:11:49 -0800 (PST), ransley
    <> wrote:

    >On Dec 23, 7:40 am, "olddog" <> wrote:
    >> We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I was
    >> using
    >> in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >>
    >> http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&top...
    >>
    >> Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >>
    >> Olddog

    >
    >What set it off was dust burning off, mine always stink for 15 minutes
    >after a year sitting, put a plastic bag over it when you store it for
    >the summer. So actualy for a minute it could have put out minimal Co,
    >but it was just dust burning off.



    I stronly suspect it was your SMOKE detector - not a CO detector that
    went off.
     
    , Dec 23, 2008
    #8
  9. olddog

    olddog Guest

    "Robert Neville" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ransley <> wrote:
    >
    >>> No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.

    >>
    >>Blow cigarette smoke into a co detector, it registers,

    >
    > And cigarette smoke comes from the combustion of tobacco, not an electric
    > heater
    > element.
    >
    >>burn dust off a 800f element it will register Co.

    >
    > And if you have anything more than a momentary blip of CO from dust on the
    > elements, you have bigger problems.
    >
    > The bottom line is that a normally operting electric heater does not
    > produce CO.


    It was strange. I've had that detector on for two years and never a peep.
    This morning I got up and grabbed the remote and aimed it at the TV near the
    detector and it went off. My natural gas fireplace WAS causing problems with
    soot so turned it off days ago but the detector never went off.

    I put my space heater on my fireplace and the detector went off for just a
    couple of seconds when I aimed the remote at it.

    Weird

    olddog
     
    olddog, Dec 23, 2008
    #9
  10. olddog

    olddog Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:11:49 -0800 (PST), ransley
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Dec 23, 7:40 am, "olddog" <> wrote:
    >>> We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I
    >>> was
    >>> using
    >>> in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&top...
    >>>
    >>> Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >>>
    >>> Olddog

    >>
    >>What set it off was dust burning off, mine always stink for 15 minutes
    >>after a year sitting, put a plastic bag over it when you store it for
    >>the summer. So actualy for a minute it could have put out minimal Co,
    >>but it was just dust burning off.

    >
    >
    > I stronly suspect it was your SMOKE detector - not a CO detector that
    > went off.


    No I've got a smoke detector too. I checked it and it's fine. I got the CO
    detector when I bought this house to be on the safe side. ;-)

    olddog
     
    olddog, Dec 23, 2008
    #10
  11. Bubba <> wrote:

    >>No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.

    >
    >NO! Actually you have to have INCOMPLETE combustion.


    Ahh, but incomplete combustion is combustion... :)
     
    Robert Neville, Dec 23, 2008
    #11
  12. olddog

    olddog Guest

    "Robert Neville" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Bubba <> wrote:
    >
    >>>No. To get CO, you have to have combustion.

    >>
    >>NO! Actually you have to have INCOMPLETE combustion.

    >
    > Ahh, but incomplete combustion is combustion... :)
    >


    I'm thinking that ransley has it right. Even though I dusted it it still
    burned off. Good call.

    I cleared the detector and it hasn't gone off again.

    olddog
     
    olddog, Dec 24, 2008
    #12
  13. olddog

    Phisherman Guest

    On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 13:40:21 GMT, "olddog" <> wrote:

    >We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I was
    >using
    >in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >
    >http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&topnav=&browse=&lang=en-US
    >
    >Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >
    >Olddog



    One of the benefits of electric heat is that there are no toxic gases
    produced. For the most part, you need combustion (burning) to get CO.
     
    Phisherman, Dec 24, 2008
    #13
  14. olddog

    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    "Phisherman" <> wrote in message
    >
    > One of the benefits of electric heat is that there are no toxic gases
    > produced. For the most part, you need combustion (burning) to get CO.


    No gasses at your house, but the power plant may produce a lot of them.
    Electric is 100% efficient for the user, but rather poorly efficient use of
    fuel to make it. That is why electric cars are a joke.
     
    Ed Pawlowski, Dec 24, 2008
    #14
  15. The Daring Dufas, Dec 25, 2008
    #15
  16. olddog

    olddog Guest

    "The Daring Dufas" <> wrote in message
    news:giulld$5m3$...
    > olddog wrote:
    >> We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I
    >> was using
    >> in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.
    >>
    >> http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&topnav=&browse=&lang=en-US
    >> Do those things put off carbon monoxide?
    >>
    >> Olddog
    >>

    >
    > If the heater hurls enough insults at
    > carbon monoxide, I would imagine that
    > it would be put off.
    >
    > TDD


    the space heater is dissin the CO

    olddog
     
    olddog, Dec 25, 2008
    #16
  17. olddog

    ransley Guest

    On Dec 24, 6:40 am, "Ed Pawlowski" <> wrote:
    > "Phisherman" <> wrote in message
    >
    > > One of the benefits of electric heat is that there are no toxic gases
    > > produced. For the most part, you need combustion (burning) to get CO.

    >
    > No gasses at your house, but the power plant may produce a lot of them.
    > Electric is 100% efficient for the user, but rather poorly efficient  use of
    > fuel to make it.  That is why electric cars are a joke.


    So you are not buying a 40,000 Chevy Volt that might only go 10 miles
    at 0f. I dont think the Volt will do to well the way things are now.
     
    ransley, Dec 25, 2008
    #17
  18. olddog

    Guest

    a tenant of mine had their detector go off christmas day years ago. me
    police fire department and finally a furnace service guy at holiday
    rates :( all on the scene.......

    finally traced to the kitchens cooking activities, after all it was
    christmas dinner.......

    wierdly I had a nice time that day, a fond memory
     
    , Dec 26, 2008
    #18
  19. olddog

    ransley Guest

    On Dec 29, 12:33 am, "SteveB" <toquerville@zionvistas> wrote:
    > "olddog" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:9T54l.92086$...
    >
    > > We have one of those electric heat-dish-parabolic space heaters that I was
    > > using
    > > in my living room since my fireplace is on the fritz.

    >
    > >http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11173501&whse=BC&top...

    >
    > > Do those things put off carbon monoxide?

    >
    > > Olddog

    >
    > No.  And if it's like the $25 one I got at Costco, I love it.  You can feel
    > the heat ten feet away.
    >
    > Steve


    In storage over years mine are full of dust and grease dog hair, for
    a few minutes they stink and burn all that crap off, that for a minute
    or so is CO. This year mine go in a plastic bag for storage.
     
    ransley, Dec 29, 2008
    #19
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