Drywall in the cold

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by Kevin Bremner, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    degrees at night.
     
    Kevin Bremner, Jan 9, 2012
    #1
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  2. Kevin Bremner

    richard Guest

    On Mon, 9 Jan 2012 04:08:07 -0800 (PST), Kevin Bremner wrote:

    > I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    > the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    > it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    > heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    > however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    > really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    > concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    > finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    > shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    > temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    > degrees at night.


    I'm no expert but I believe that is not an issue with drywall.
    After all, unoccupied houses have it installed and it's still good after
    years of exposure to the cold.
    If you can though, talk to dry wall installers in your area and ask them.
     
    richard, Jan 9, 2012
    #2
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  3. Kevin Bremner

    PeterD Guest

    On 1/9/2012 7:08 AM, Kevin Bremner wrote:
    > I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    > the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    > it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    > heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    > however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    > really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    > concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    > finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    > shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    > temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    > degrees at night.


    If you are worried, maybe put in a small 1500 watt electric heater, and
    close the doors? That likely will maintain the temp well above freezing
    (which is the only issue I can think of) until the mud is 'dry'.

    --
    I'm never going to grow up.
     
    PeterD, Jan 9, 2012
    #3
  4. Kevin Bremner

    HerHusband Guest

    > I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    > the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    > it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    > heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    > however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    > really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    > concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    > finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    > shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    > temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    > degrees at night.


    I'm just an amateur, but have installed a lot of drywall. When the temps
    get cold, it can take a long time for the joint compound to dry. When we
    drywalled our garage, some areas took well over a day to completely dry.

    I wouldn't want to risk the mud freezing as ice crystals could form and
    cause odd results. Maybe close off the room and run a small electric heater
    to keep the room above freezing.

    You could also try using a setting type compound that cures chemically
    rather than drying. They come with a variety of cure times from 15 minutes
    to 90 minutes. I'm no speed pro, so I usually go with the 90 minute
    option. It comes dry in bags and you have to mix up the batch yourself with
    water. However, I find it can still take nearly a day for the moisture to
    dry out, even once the compound sets and hardens. Setting compound is also
    harder and more difficult to sand, so you probably won't want to use it for
    the final coat(s).

    Anthony
     
    HerHusband, Jan 9, 2012
    #4
  5. Kevin Bremner

    jloomis Guest

    Use the 90 set quick mud.
    It will still be nice to be somewhat warm during application, but the mud
    will set depending on the grade purchased.
    I mix small batches at a time, and it does mix well.
    I also wash tools as soon as I am done mixing so that it does not set on
    them.
    Then go for it with the 90 set.

    Can cover lots of area and also can "wet sand" or I usually use the flat
    blade to knock off the highs so that it is ready to mud again.
    jloomisconstruction.com

    "Kevin Bremner" wrote in message
    news:...

    I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    degrees at night.
     
    jloomis, Jan 9, 2012
    #5
  6. Kevin Bremner

    jloomis Guest

    I have used 90 set extensively and for finish also.
    Never a problem and works fine.
    I usually knock down the highs with the blade after about 90 min.
    No dust either......
    And sanding is usual too.
    A little heat only helps.
    john

    "HerHusband" wrote in message
    news:Xns9FD54603FC89Cherhusband@88.198.244.100...

    > I will be putting the final pieces of drywall up in the addition in
    > the next day or so and will be ready to mud. Question is, how cold can
    > it get? Heat during application is not an issue. I have a torpedo
    > heater which keeps it nice and toasty while I'm in there working,
    > however, there is no permanent heat until the floor goes down. I don't
    > really like the idea of running that heater all night long but I'm
    > concerned about letting the temps go too low that it will affect the
    > finished product. Can I leave the heat on until the mud dries and then
    > shut it off until the next day? I am in a cold climate and the outside
    > temp lately is mid teens at night so the addition goes below 32
    > degrees at night.


    I'm just an amateur, but have installed a lot of drywall. When the temps
    get cold, it can take a long time for the joint compound to dry. When we
    drywalled our garage, some areas took well over a day to completely dry.

    I wouldn't want to risk the mud freezing as ice crystals could form and
    cause odd results. Maybe close off the room and run a small electric heater
    to keep the room above freezing.

    You could also try using a setting type compound that cures chemically
    rather than drying. They come with a variety of cure times from 15 minutes
    to 90 minutes. I'm no speed pro, so I usually go with the 90 minute
    option. It comes dry in bags and you have to mix up the batch yourself with
    water. However, I find it can still take nearly a day for the moisture to
    dry out, even once the compound sets and hardens. Setting compound is also
    harder and more difficult to sand, so you probably won't want to use it for
    the final coat(s).

    Anthony
     
    jloomis, Jan 9, 2012
    #6
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