Drilling a hole in a porcelain sink

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Butzmark, Sep 6, 2006.

  1. Butzmark

    Butzmark Guest

    I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    bimetal. Anybody know?
     
    Butzmark, Sep 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. I drilled a hole in my porcelain sink for an RO faucet too and it was easier
    than I thought it would be. The key is to get a carbide hole saw. I got mine
    from Home Depot, about 20.00
    Go slow to minimize chipping.

    Good luck

    "Butzmark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    > is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    > faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    > to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    > I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    > an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    > bimetal. Anybody know?
    >
     
    Steve Bushakus, Sep 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. Butzmark

    Guest

    Copper or brass tubing of the diameter of the hole you want to drill
    and some coarse silicon carbide abrasive grit. Cut a few slots in the
    end of the tubing, make a dam with putty around the drilling site. Add
    grit and water to the dam and use the tubing as the drill with it's end
    charged in the grit every few seconds.
    Butzmark wrote:
    > I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    > is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    > faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    > to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    > I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    > an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    > bimetal. Anybody know?
     
    , Sep 6, 2006
    #3
  4. Butzmark

    JimL Guest

    On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 19:49:28 -0400, Butzmark <> wrote:

    >I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    >is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    >faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    >to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    >I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    >an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    >bimetal. Anybody know?


    A plumber told me that those reverse osmosis filters waste a huge
    amount of water.

    You might consider running your tubing to a 5 gallon bucket instead
    of dumping it down the drain.

    a. It lets you see how much water you are wasting.
    b. You can use it water your plants.
     
    JimL, Sep 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Butzmark

    Jeff Wisnia Guest

    wrote:

    > Copper or brass tubing of the diameter of the hole you want to drill
    > and some coarse silicon carbide abrasive grit. Cut a few slots in the
    > end of the tubing, make a dam with putty around the drilling site. Add
    > grit and water to the dam and use the tubing as the drill with it's end
    > charged in the grit every few seconds.



    Uh, you left off telling him how to spin that 1-1/4" tubing other than
    by rolling it between the palms of his hands.

    Seems unlikely that he'd have a power drill around with a chuck that
    large. (Or could lift it if he did. <G>)

    OTOH, if he found that a 1" copper sweat pipe cap was the right size he
    could drill a 1/4" hole centerED in it's end and use a well tightened
    bolt and nut as an arbor he could chuck in a drill.

    Jeff

    --
    Jeffry Wisnia
    (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
    "Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength."
     
    Jeff Wisnia, Sep 6, 2006
    #5
  6. Butzmark wrote:
    > I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    > is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    > faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    > to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    > I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    > an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    > bimetal. Anybody know?


    what you need is a tile bit
    check out any diy home supply

    they have bits to cut granite, porcelain, ceramic etc

    i have a 5/8th's ceramic bit you can try, you want me to email it to
    you?
     
    sosessyithurts, Sep 6, 2006
    #6
  7. Butzmark

    Butzmark Guest

    On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 19:49:28 -0400, Butzmark <> wrote:

    >I just got an reverse osmosis filter. The first step in installation
    >is to make a one and a quarter inch hole in the sink top for it's
    >faucet. I bought a bimetal hole saw of that size and proceeded to try
    >to drill a pilot hole with an 1\8 inch metal bit...no luck. Tomorrow
    >I'll go buy something else for the pilot hole. I'm thinking I may need
    >an abrasive bit for the porcelain layer and then switch to the
    >bimetal. Anybody know?



    So I bought a Hitachi carbide grit hole saw at Lowe's for eleven
    bucks. It has a pilot bit attached. It went through the sink pretty
    easily. The pilot bit was sort of a spade bit arrangement with a piece
    of carbide on the end of a shaft. The shaft was a smaller diameter
    than the carbide so once the carbide went through the bottom of the
    sink material I lost some tightness from the guide bit, which
    roughened the cut up a bit. The faucet flange is big enough to cover
    the area around the inch and a quarter that was cut up some. If I
    needed a real clean Inch and a quarter hole I'd probably use something
    else, but this worked well.

    Thanks all
     
    Butzmark, Sep 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Butzmark wrote:
    > So I bought a Hitachi carbide grit hole saw at Lowe's for eleven
    > bucks. It has a pilot bit attached. It went through the sink pretty
    > easily. The pilot bit was sort of a spade bit arrangement with a piece
    > of carbide on the end of a shaft. The shaft was a smaller diameter
    > than the carbide so once the carbide went through the bottom of the
    > sink material I lost some tightness from the guide bit, which
    > roughened the cut up a bit. The faucet flange is big enough to cover
    > the area around the inch and a quarter that was cut up some. If I
    > needed a real clean Inch and a quarter hole I'd probably use something
    > else, but this worked well.


    cool deal

    yeah I suspect a precision cut would require a at leats a $30 - $50
    spade bit
    probaly just a solid heavy bit, not a hole saw type
    *the spade bit I bought for drilling cermic didn't have grit

    I always like it when I have the right tools for a job
     
    sosessyithurts, Sep 7, 2006
    #8
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