Doorbell always uses electricity!

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by Bill, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    etc.

    These things add up...

    I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.

    I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    transformer.
     
    Bill, Nov 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. Bill

    Mikepier Guest

    On Nov 19, 9:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.


    Congratulations, you've just saved yourself 25 cents a year in
    electricity.
    Not to mention it might not be safe if someone is standing on wet
    pavement and they gey shocked by 120V.
    You probably spent more in the material than if you let the Xfmr stay
    on for 20 years.
    Now how are you going to deal with the TV, fridge, phone, alarm clock,
    microwave. Wait don't forget VCR/DVD player, cable box, heating
    system, computer, sprinkler timer,
     
    Mikepier, Nov 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. Bill

    Seerialmom Guest

    On Nov 19, 6:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.


    My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few
    pennies a month". But I investigated and found a rather interesting
    read related to your theory where the author actually tested the
    doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:

    http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html

    Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time
    and effort to change.
     
    Seerialmom, Nov 20, 2008
    #3
  4. Bill wrote:
    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.
    >
    >

    I had a friend some years ago who ran the communications
    division of the local power company. This was back when
    they had HF radios for communications and the techs actually
    had to know something about electronics. They would get
    electronic interference complaints which were often traced
    to doorbell transformers. It was a very common problem and
    one that many people don't even think of today.

    TDD
     
    The Daring Dufas, Nov 20, 2008
    #4
  5. With the cost of the parts, romex, etc. The break even date is probably some
    where in the year 2029. You know, third year of the Gonzalez administration.
    He took over from the Castro administration.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    "Red Green" <postmaster@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:Xns9B5BDC3B71049RedGreen@216.168.3.70...

    It's probably stamped right on it but I never looked. Any idea how many
    watts it's uses in it's standby state?
     
    Stormin Mormon, Nov 20, 2008
    #5
  6. With any luck, he'll also remember the computer, the hair dryer, the pump
    in the fish tank, and all the other big power drains.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    "Mikepier" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    Congratulations, you've just saved yourself 25 cents a year in
    electricity.
    Not to mention it might not be safe if someone is standing on wet
    pavement and they gey shocked by 120V.
    You probably spent more in the material than if you let the Xfmr stay
    on for 20 years.
    Now how are you going to deal with the TV, fridge, phone, alarm clock,
    microwave. Wait don't forget VCR/DVD player, cable box, heating
    system, computer, sprinkler timer,
     
    Stormin Mormon, Nov 20, 2008
    #6
  7. Bill

    retired54 Guest

    "Seerialmom" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Nov 19, 6:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the
    > doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex
    > from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the
    > old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.


    My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few
    pennies a month". But I investigated and found a rather interesting
    read related to your theory where the author actually tested the
    doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:

    http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html

    Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time
    and effort to change.

    =============================================

    $3.15/year. Pretty good deal.

    Olddog
     
    retired54, Nov 20, 2008
    #7
  8. Bill

    Leroy Guest

    Seerialmom wrote:
    > On Nov 19, 6:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    >> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    >> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    >> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    >> etc.
    >>
    >> These things add up...
    >>
    >> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the
    >> doorbell button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time
    >> now.
    >>
    >> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex
    >> from this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    >> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    >> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    >> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    >> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    >> transformer.

    >
    > My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few
    > pennies a month". But I investigated and found a rather interesting
    > read related to your theory where the author actually tested the
    > doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:
    >
    > http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html
    >
    > Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time
    > and effort to change.


    yeah, the article stated 3 lousy watts for a *lighted* doorbell. I doubt
    that an unlighted doorbell switch even draws a watt. It's a transformer
    but it has *no* load on it at all except for the brief moment it's pushed.
    Much ado about Nothing.

    One watt for a year would be about a dollar a year. The payback
    on all the OP's effort will take a Long time. <g>
     
    Leroy, Nov 20, 2008
    #8
  9. Bill

    E Z Peaces Guest

    Vic Smith wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:44:47 -0800 (PST), Mikepier
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On Nov 19, 9:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    >>> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    >>> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    >>> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    >>> etc.
    >>>
    >>> These things add up...
    >>>
    >>> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    >>> button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >>>
    >>> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    >>> this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    >>> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    >>> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    >>> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    >>> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    >>> transformer.

    >> Congratulations, you've just saved yourself 25 cents a year in
    >> electricity.
    >> Not to mention it might not be safe if someone is standing on wet
    >> pavement and they gey shocked by 120V.

    >
    > Geeze, I replaced the transformer powered doorbell in my house 10
    > years ago with a 15 buck wireless chimer. Couple screws and it's
    > done. Replaced the AAA batteries once in all that time.
    >
    > --Vic


    Doorbells once used carbon-zinc batteries. Their shelf life wasn't
    good. That explains the change to transformers.

    I've tried battery-powered wireless door chimes. I used AA alkalines,
    which have a much longer shelf life than conventional carbon-zinc. The
    problem was the current draw of the receivers. A set of batteries would
    last only a few months, and a lot of visitors might leave frustrated
    before I realized my chime was out of service.

    How about a wired chime using a lithium battery? The battery could
    outlast a transformer and be cheaper to replace.
     
    E Z Peaces, Nov 20, 2008
    #9
  10. Bill

    max Guest

    In article <>,
    "Bill" <> wrote:

    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.


    i have a door knocker. My old house had a hand-cranked
    through-the-door doorbell.

    No annoying ground currents to kill the Jehovah's Witnesses.

    ..max

    --
    This signature can be appended to your outgoing mesages. Many people include in
    their signatures contact information, and perhaps a joke or quotation.
     
    max, Nov 20, 2008
    #10
  11. Bill

    The Real Bev Guest

    E Z Peaces wrote:

    > Vic Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Geeze, I replaced the transformer powered doorbell in my house 10
    >> years ago with a 15 buck wireless chimer. Couple screws and it's
    >> done. Replaced the AAA batteries once in all that time.

    >
    > Doorbells once used carbon-zinc batteries. Their shelf life wasn't
    > good. That explains the change to transformers.
    >
    > I've tried battery-powered wireless door chimes. I used AA alkalines,
    > which have a much longer shelf life than conventional carbon-zinc. The
    > problem was the current draw of the receivers. A set of batteries would
    > last only a few months, and a lot of visitors might leave frustrated
    > before I realized my chime was out of service.


    I don't understand why this is a problem.

    > How about a wired chime using a lithium battery? The battery could
    > outlast a transformer and be cheaper to replace.


    Or rechargeables. The precharged NiMH ones seem to hold their charge
    for a long time.

    Ours just emits a strangled sort of buzz; replacing it with a cheap
    wireless one would be a definite advantage if it weren't for the fact
    that our friends all know to knock -- anybody who rings the "bell" only
    wants to convert us to something or sell us something.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =================================================================
    "There's an apocryphal (I hope not !) story about a Bristol bike
    thief found cold, wet and bedraggled one morning, D locked by the
    neck to a local bridge." -- Anon
     
    The Real Bev, Nov 20, 2008
    #11
  12. Bill

    The Real Bev Guest

    Stormin Mormon wrote:

    > With any luck, he'll also remember the computer, the hair dryer, the pump
    > in the fish tank, and all the other big power drains.


    Don't forget the clock on the microwave.

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =================================================================
    "There's an apocryphal (I hope not !) story about a Bristol bike
    thief found cold, wet and bedraggled one morning, D locked by the
    neck to a local bridge." -- Anon
     
    The Real Bev, Nov 20, 2008
    #12
  13. max wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "Bill" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    >> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    >> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    >> etc.
    >>
    >> These things add up...
    >>
    >> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    >> button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >>
    >> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    >> this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    >> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    >> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    >> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    >> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    >> transformer.

    >
    > i have a door knocker. My old house had a hand-cranked
    > through-the-door doorbell.
    >
    > No annoying ground currents to kill the Jehovah's Witnesses.
    >
    > .max
    >


    I had a big brass Taiwanese taxi horn on the
    door to my apartment which was at the top of
    an enclosed stairwell. The booming sound it
    made when someone squeezed that big old black
    rubber bulb was breathtaking. Heck that was 35
    years ago, I don't recall what became of that
    damn thing but I wish I still had it.

    Jehovah's Witnesses are fun to mess with. I
    had a big black cape and cap with some horns.
    In my best Boris Karloff voice I would invite
    them in explaining that I was in need of a good
    sacrifice. Have you ever seen a Jehovah Witness
    run?

    TDD
     
    The Daring Dufas, Nov 20, 2008
    #13
  14. Bill

    George Guest

    Leroy wrote:

    >
    > yeah, the article stated 3 lousy watts for a *lighted* doorbell. I doubt
    > that an unlighted doorbell switch even draws a watt. It's a transformer
    > but it has *no* load on it at all except for the brief moment it's pushed.
    > Much ado about Nothing.
    >


    But a transformer with no load consumes power which is largely given off
    as heat. You can observe this by feeling the transformer. Such loads
    collectively add up to a lot of waste. If you have purchased any devices
    that use external power supplies (cell phone charger, router in recent
    times you will notice that that they no longer use transformers and come
    with much more efficient switching power supplies. When it comes to
    power waste slow and steady wins the race.

    > One watt for a year would be about a dollar a year. The payback
    > on all the OP's effort will take a Long time. <g>
    >
     
    George, Nov 20, 2008
    #14
  15. Bill

    terry Guest

    On Nov 20, 12:54 am, "Leroy" <> wrote:
    > Seerialmom wrote:
    > > On Nov 19, 6:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > >> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > >> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > >> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > >> etc.

    >
    > >> These things add up...

    >
    > >> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the
    > >> doorbell button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time
    > >> now.

    >
    > >> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex
    > >> from this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blankwall
    > >> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > >> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer whenthe
    > >> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > >> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > >> transformer.

    >
    > > My first thought when reading this was "ok...so we'd save a few
    > > pennies a month".  But I investigated and found a rather interesting
    > > read related to your theory where the author actually tested the
    > > doorbell transformer using a Kill-A-Watt:

    >
    > >http://www.newenglandbreeze.com/nl/TEM20080901.html

    >
    > > Luckily my doorbell isn't lighted, so it's probably not worth my time
    > > and effort to change.

    >
    > yeah, the article stated 3 lousy watts for a *lighted* doorbell.  I doubt
    > that an unlighted doorbell switch even draws a watt.  It's a transformer
    > but it has *no* load on it at all except for the brief moment it's pushed..
    > Much ado about Nothing.
    >
    > One watt for a year would be about a dollar a year.  The payback
    > on all the OP's effort will take a Long time. <g>- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Such a door bell transformer is typically capable of a maximum of 7
    watts or less when it is actually ringing the bell or door chime. Many
    are not designed for continuous use. Next time I have spare moment
    will measure the amount of electrcity such a transformer takes in it'
    'idle' state.
    It's most likely a few milliamps. Well lets say 10 milliamps (A 100th
    of one amp) to be generous to a fairly low grade transformer.
    One 100th of an amp at 115 volts = 1.15 watts per hour, 27.6 watt
    hours per day or 10,074 watt hours per year. That's just over 10
    kilowatt hours per year. Although I doubt it is that high?
    At my cost of electrcity (ten cents per kilowatt hour) that's just
    about one dollar per year. A saving of one dollar per year (over 20
    years) could probably amortize a capital saving at the start of that
    period of around $12. Spend more that and it not economic.
    Our transformer which has been in place for the last 38 years does run
    slightly warm. In this cool climate that warmth does very, very
    slightly, but insignificantly, contribute to the electric house
    heating. Probably less so than normally leaving the bath and shower
    water to cool down to house temperature.
    Seemed like rather pointless exercise?
     
    terry, Nov 20, 2008
    #15
  16. Bill

    terry Guest

    On Nov 20, 12:59 am, E Z Peaces <> wrote:
    > Vic Smith wrote:
    > > On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:44:47 -0800 (PST), Mikepier
    > > <> wrote:

    >
    > >> On Nov 19, 9:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > >>> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > >>> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > >>> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > >>> etc.

    >
    > >>> These things add up...

    >
    > >>> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > >>> button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.

    >
    > >>> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > >>> this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > >>> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > >>> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > >>> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > >>> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > >>> transformer.
    > >> Congratulations, you've just saved yourself 25 cents a year in
    > >> electricity.
    > >> Not to mention it might not be safe if someone is standing on wet
    > >> pavement and they gey shocked by 120V.

    >
    > > Geeze, I replaced the transformer powered doorbell in my house 10
    > > years ago with a 15 buck wireless chimer.  Couple screws and it's
    > > done.  Replaced the AAA batteries once in all that time.

    >
    > > --Vic

    >
    > Doorbells once used carbon-zinc batteries.  Their shelf life wasn't
    > good.  That explains the change to transformers.
    >
    > I've tried battery-powered wireless door chimes.  I used AA alkalines,
    > which have a much longer shelf life than conventional carbon-zinc.  The
    > problem was the current draw of the receivers.  A set of batteries would
    > last only a few months, and a lot of visitors might leave frustrated
    > before I realized my chime was out of service.
    >
    > How about a wired chime using a lithium battery?  The battery could
    > outlast a transformer and be cheaper to replace.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Make your own batteries?
    As mentioned before; in the 1950s I found the remnants of of some
    original LeClanche cells.
    Leclanche cells were renewable. A glass jar with a carbon stick
    positive anode that never wore out, immersed in a strong solution of
    alkali (called Sal-ammoniac) and a zinc plate negative. Wires were
    attached to the carbon and zinc.
    When the zinc wore away and/or the Sal-ammoniac dried out spares could
    be purchased at a local hardware/iron-mongers store.
    With todays low power solid state (transistor) devices perhaps we
    could make our own batteries out of sea water, vinegar or household
    bleach and scrap iron????????
    Now if I could only make one (several) big enough to run those 'dud
    battery' cordless drills I have lying around!!!!!! :)
     
    terry, Nov 20, 2008
    #16
  17. Bill

    Guest

    well I suppose you could use a battery to power the normal doorbell
    button with no light and trip a solid state relay, that would power
    the transformer just to ring bell.

    taken futher a solar panel could keep the battery charged.

    or heck go solar completely with LED lights you might be able to have
    the button light up:)

    probably cost a few hundred bucks, to save a dollar or two a year.

    put the solar panel somewhere it cant be stolen. they can be costly.

    someone has too much time on their hands:(

    cut out a decent candy bar a day, at a buck each and save 300 to 400
    bucks a year
     
    , Nov 20, 2008
    #17
  18. Bill

    Pat Guest

    On Nov 19, 9:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    > Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    > electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    > TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    > etc.
    >
    > These things add up...
    >
    > I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    > button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    > I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    > this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    > plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    > switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    > button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    > button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    > transformer.


    Great idea, but a bit over-built. Just run a 120 line to the doorbell
    switch, remove the switch entirely and put a metal cap on it. It'll
    use no power whatsoever. Then when someone pushes the button they'll
    get the sh*t shocked out of them and when you hear the yelling you'll
    know you have a visitor. It's a much simpler design and will give the
    same results.
     
    Pat, Nov 20, 2008
    #18
  19. Bill

    PeterD Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:21:14 -0800, "Bill"
    <> wrote:

    >Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    >electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    >TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    >etc.
    >
    >These things add up...
    >
    >I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    >button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >
    >I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    >this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    >plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    >switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    >button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    >button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    >transformer.
    >


    And probably spent more money on something that is perhaps unsafe than
    if you'd just let it be... (IMHO!)

    At rest, with no secondary current, a properly designed transformer
    will draw virtually no primary current. We're talking perhaps a
    quarter watt max, usually less.

    Now, at a quarter watt, that's six watt-hours per day, or 186 watt
    hours per month. At $0.15 per KWh, you are talking perhaps $0.03 on
    the electric bill each month. Now, what's the payback for your
    project? Say you spent $30 on the romex and switch and box (probably
    spent more) you'll get your money back, oh, about the time hell
    freezes over!

    Another prime example of people acting without thinking. Just like
    every other knee-jerk reaction to a percieved (and non-existant)
    problem.
     
    PeterD, Nov 20, 2008
    #19
  20. Bill

    PeterD Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 20:51:58 -0600, Vic Smith
    <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 18:44:47 -0800 (PST), Mikepier
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Nov 19, 9:21 pm, "Bill" <> wrote:
    >>> Wired doorbells have a transformer which is always on and always using
    >>> electricity. This is yet one more thing in the house which does this like
    >>> TV, microwave, remote control things, things with clocks, plug-in phones,
    >>> etc.
    >>>
    >>> These things add up...
    >>>
    >>> I replaced/rewired my switch so the transformer is only on when the doorbell
    >>> button is pressed! Thus the transformer is off most of the time now.
    >>>
    >>> I installed a regular electrical box at my front door, ran 14 ga. romex from
    >>> this box to the doorbell transformer, then got a nice brass blank wall
    >>> plate, drilled a hole in this plate, then installed a 120V momentary push
    >>> switch in the plate. Then wired this to switch on the transformer when the
    >>> button is pressed. Then connected the two wires which were going to the old
    >>> button so the doorbell would ring as soon as it receives power from the
    >>> transformer.

    >>
    >>Congratulations, you've just saved yourself 25 cents a year in
    >>electricity.
    >>Not to mention it might not be safe if someone is standing on wet
    >>pavement and they gey shocked by 120V.

    >
    >Geeze, I replaced the transformer powered doorbell in my house 10
    >years ago with a 15 buck wireless chimer. Couple screws and it's
    >done. Replaced the AAA batteries once in all that time.
    >
    >--Vic


    Why not just a plain-old fashioned door knocker? No batteries, works
    well, very reliable, even works if the power is off, and it's *green*
    (especially if made from cheap brass imported from China!)
     
    PeterD, Nov 20, 2008
    #20
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