Cost of adding second layer of bricks to a conservatory

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by google@compoundeye.co.uk, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    I'm wondering if anyone can give me any tips on fixing up a
    conservatory.

    I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    outside of the house than the inside!

    We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work? I guess what I'm
    after is a ball-park cost per square meter for DIY vs professional
    builder. I'm willing to do it myself but I have no experience and if
    the cost of brick-laying labour isn't extortionate then it might be
    simpler to get a bricky in.

    Can anyone give me any advice?

    Cheers

    M.
     
    , Dec 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. Guest

    On Dec 1, 5:08 pm, wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone can give me any tips on fixing up a
    > conservatory.
    >
    > I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    > ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    > single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    > outside of the house than the inside!
    >
    > We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    > between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    > any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work? I guess what I'm
    > after is a ball-park cost per square meter for DIY vs professional
    > builder. I'm willing to do it myself but I have no experience and if
    > the cost of brick-laying labour isn't extortionate then it might be
    > simpler to get a bricky in.
    >
    > Can anyone give me any advice?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > M.


    I don't know if building codes in the UK allow it, but if it were my
    place in the United States, I would put up an inner wall of gypsum
    board with a layer of insulation (we call it drywall) in between, much
    less expensive and quicker than brick.-Jitney
     
    , Dec 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. wrote:

    >I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    >ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    >single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    >outside of the house than the inside!
    >
    >We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    >between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    >any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work?


    Just to get things into proportion, roughly what are the relative
    areas of glass and brickwork?

    If it is only a dwarf wall, then whilst you would improve the
    situation, would it make enough difference?

    Chris
    --
    Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK


    Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.
     
    Chris J Dixon, Dec 2, 2007
    #3
  4. robgraham Guest

    On 2 Dec, 07:59, Chris J Dixon <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > >I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    > >ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    > >single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    > >outside of the house than the inside!

    >
    > >We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    > >between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    > >any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work?

    >
    > Just to get things into proportion, roughly what are the relative
    > areas of glass and brickwork?
    >
    > If it is only a dwarf wall, then whilst you would improve the
    > situation, would it make enough difference?
    >
    > Chris
    > --
    > Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
    >
    >
    > Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.


    Extending Chris' query, what is the roofing material ? If the dwarf
    wall is single brick then it suggests the structure was put up on the
    cheap and an inexpensive roof covering with poor insulation has been
    used.

    I would guess you would get a far greater improvement if there was
    better insulation in the roof covering.

    Rob
     
    robgraham, Dec 2, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    > I don't know if building codes in the UK allow it, but if it were my
    > place in the United States, I would put up an inner wall of gypsum
    > board with a layer of insulation (we call it drywall) in between, much
    > less expensive and quicker than brick.-Jitney


    Sounds like a very practical idea, thanks!

    M.
     
    , Dec 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Dec 2, 9:59 am, robgraham <> wrote:
    > On 2 Dec, 07:59, Chris J Dixon <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > wrote:
    > > >I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    > > >ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    > > >single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    > > >outside of the house than the inside!

    >
    > > >We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    > > >between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    > > >any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work?

    >
    > > Just to get things into proportion, roughly what are the relative
    > > areas of glass and brickwork?

    >
    > > If it is only a dwarf wall, then whilst you would improve the
    > > situation, would it make enough difference?

    >
    > > Chris
    > > --
    > > Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
    > >

    >
    > > Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

    >
    > Extending Chris' query, what is the roofing material ? If the dwarf
    > wall is single brick then it suggests the structure was put up on the
    > cheap and an inexpensive roof covering with poor insulation has been
    > used.
    >
    > I would guess you would get a far greater improvement if there was
    > better insulation in the roof covering.


    Yup, it was definitely put up on the cheap! The roof is
    polycarbarbonate no more than 15 - 20mm so kicking myself for not
    thinking of that. I imagine that's a pretty good at losing heat. So,
    double glazed glass roof needed I guess?

    M.
     
    , Dec 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Guest

    > Just to get things into proportion, roughly what are the relative
    > areas of glass and brickwork?


    The conservatory is about 6 - 7 ft x 20 - 22. One of the side walls
    has no windows, the back wall has a pair of double glazed doors. The
    other side wall and the back wall are about 2.5 - 3 feet high, the
    rest is windows. So two thirds window, one third brick roughly.

    M.
     
    , Dec 2, 2007
    #7
  8. dg Guest

    On 2 Dec, 01:08, wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone can give me any tips on fixing up a
    > conservatory.
    >
    > I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough and
    > ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it only has a
    > single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like part of the
    > outside of the house than the inside!
    >
    > We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    > between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone have
    > any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work? I guess what I'm
    > after is a ball-park cost per square meter for DIY vs professional
    > builder. I'm willing to do it myself but I have no experience and if
    > the cost of brick-laying labour isn't extortionate then it might be
    > simpler to get a bricky in.
    >
    > Can anyone give me any advice?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > M.


    Most of the heat is going up and out through the glass or the roof.
    The thermal improvements in adding an inner skin are negligible - let
    alone the practicalities and expense.

    If you really need to do something, then dry-line it with a 50mm layer
    of PIR foam (Celotex/kingspan) and plasterboard and skim

    dg
     
    dg, Dec 2, 2007
    #8
  9. clot Guest

    wrote:
    > On Dec 2, 9:59 am, robgraham <> wrote:
    >> On 2 Dec, 07:59, Chris J Dixon <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> I've just moved into a new 2 bed house and it has a pretty rough
    >>>> and ready conservatory. It's double glazed on all sides but it
    >>>> only has a single layer brick wall, so it's cold, it's more like
    >>>> part of the outside of the house than the inside!

    >>
    >>>> We think that putting in another layer of bricks with insulation in
    >>>> between will transform it into a proper usable space. Does anyone
    >>>> have any kind of rough guide to pricing up brick work?

    >>
    >>> Just to get things into proportion, roughly what are the relative
    >>> areas of glass and brickwork?

    >>
    >>> If it is only a dwarf wall, then whilst you would improve the
    >>> situation, would it make enough difference?

    >>
    >>> Chris
    >>> --
    >>> Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
    >>>

    >>
    >>> Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

    >>
    >> Extending Chris' query, what is the roofing material ? If the dwarf
    >> wall is single brick then it suggests the structure was put up on the
    >> cheap and an inexpensive roof covering with poor insulation has been
    >> used.
    >>
    >> I would guess you would get a far greater improvement if there was
    >> better insulation in the roof covering.

    >
    > Yup, it was definitely put up on the cheap! The roof is
    > polycarbarbonate no more than 15 - 20mm so kicking myself for not
    > thinking of that. I imagine that's a pretty good at losing heat. So,
    > double glazed glass roof needed I guess?



    Careful! From what I've read, (I no practical experience of this) some
    conservatories built with polycarbonate roofing may not be sufficiently
    sound to take double glazing.
     
    clot, Dec 2, 2007
    #9
  10. Guest

    > Careful! From what I've read, (I no practical experience of this) some
    > conservatories built with polycarbonate roofing may not be sufficiently
    > sound to take double glazing.


    Bugger :eek:/

    Anyone know what I need to look for to say if it can hanlde double
    glazing or not?

    M.
     
    , Dec 3, 2007
    #10
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