Correctly framing 45 degree angles in walls

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by psubill78@gmail.com, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    frame it out to keep the shape.

    I searched to find some pictures or a design on how to do this properly
    so that the drywallers would not have difficulty putting in the
    drywall..

    Suggestions?
    , Oct 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. longshot Guest

    Rip your framing with a table saw set on 45 degrees

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    > how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    > There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    > frame it out to keep the shape.
    >
    > I searched to find some pictures or a design on how to do this properly
    > so that the drywallers would not have difficulty putting in the
    > drywall..
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    longshot, Oct 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Willshak Guest

    wrote:
    > I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    > how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    > There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    > frame it out to keep the shape.
    >
    > I searched to find some pictures or a design on how to do this properly
    > so that the drywallers would not have difficulty putting in the
    > drywall..
    >
    > Suggestions?
    >
    >


    Are you meaning to frame the steps area leading to the Bilco door?
    If so, why bother?
    I framed my basement and when I got to the stairs area, I just framed
    the basement wall for an outside insulated door and left the stair area
    as it was. I insulated well around the door framing. The locking
    insulated door served as a more secure basement, as well as providing
    more insulation than the Bilco door. From inside, the door looks like
    any other door to another room or to the outside.

    --
    Bill
    in Hamptonburgh, NY
    To email, delete the double zeroes after @
    Willshak, Oct 17, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    Right, what if I don't have access to a table saw....

    Are there any other options/methods?


    longshot wrote:
    > Rip your framing with a table saw set on 45 degrees
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    > > how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    > > There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    > > frame it out to keep the shape.
    > >
    > > I searched to find some pictures or a design on how to do this properly
    > > so that the drywallers would not have difficulty putting in the
    > > drywall..
    > >
    > > Suggestions?
    > >
    , Oct 17, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    On 16 Oct 2006 18:40:04 -0700, wrote:

    >Right, what if I don't have access to a table saw....


    Clamp a two by on edge in your Workmatel walk down it with your skill
    saw set at 45.

    >Are there any other options/methods?


    On an inside corner, you can butt two by's at a 45 degree angle. An
    outside corner is just the reverse of an inside corner ... you can
    float the corner as a second choice.

    Ken
    , Oct 17, 2006
    #5
  6. HerHusband Guest

    >> I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    >> how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    >> There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    >> frame it out to keep the shape.


    > Rip your framing with a table saw set on 45 degrees


    Wouldn't you want to rip the framing at 22-1/2 degrees?

    If you cut each wall at 45 degrees and butt them together, you'll end up
    with a 90 degree turn.

    Anthony
    HerHusband, Oct 17, 2006
    #6
  7. longshot Guest

    "HerHusband" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns985F4DA3563FBherhusband@216.196.97.136...
    >>> I'm finishing off my basement, and am having some issues figuring out
    >>> how to properly build the walls to follow my foundation structure.
    >>> There is a bay door that the foundation walls follow and I want to
    >>> frame it out to keep the shape.

    >
    >> Rip your framing with a table saw set on 45 degrees

    >
    > Wouldn't you want to rip the framing at 22-1/2 degrees?
    >
    > If you cut each wall at 45 degrees and butt them together, you'll end up
    > with a 90 degree turn.
    >
    > Anthony


    all depends on your layout. either would work
    longshot, Oct 17, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    On Tue, 17 Oct 2006 09:37:55 -0500, HerHusband <>
    wrote:


    >Wouldn't you want to rip the framing at 22-1/2 degrees?
    >
    >If you cut each wall at 45 degrees and butt them together, you'll end up
    >with a 90 degree turn.
    >

    You cut one at 45.

    Ken
    , Oct 17, 2006
    #8
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