Chimney sweeping...

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Tim Watts, Mar 27, 2010.

  1. Tim Watts

    Tim Watts Guest

    Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...

    Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined chimney
    or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel liner is
    just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without knocking the cap
    cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old hoover attached to
    catch the crap?

    --
    Tim Watts

    Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
    Tim Watts, Mar 27, 2010
    #1
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  2. Tim Watts

    JimK Guest

    On Mar 27, 7:18 pm, Tim Watts <> wrote:
    > Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >
    > Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined chimney
    > or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel liner is
    > just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without knocking the cap
    > cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old hoover attached to
    > catch the crap?
    >


    presume it's on a stove?

    Can you get to the cap and remove it and pull a brush *down* it with
    rope??

    then all you need is a 5 or 6 inch "bottle brush" no rods, and less
    risk of knacking the liner on bends with rods etc...

    Cheers
    JimK
    JimK, Mar 27, 2010
    #2
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  3. Tim Watts

    Tim Watts Guest

    JimK <>
    wibbled on Saturday 27 March 2010 20:28

    > On Mar 27, 7:18 pm, Tim Watts <> wrote:
    >> Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >>
    >> Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined
    >> chimney or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel
    >> liner is just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without
    >> knocking the cap cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old
    >> hoover attached to catch the crap?
    >>

    >
    > presume it's on a stove?


    Yes.

    > Can you get to the cap and remove it and pull a brush *down* it with
    > rope??
    >
    > then all you need is a 5 or 6 inch "bottle brush" no rods, and less
    > risk of knacking the liner on bends with rods etc...


    It's an interesting idea, but I'd prefer to avoid roof side work ;->

    There are no significant bends apart from "danglage" and a very slight
    slight curve at the base. Access is good as it's a top flued stove - so only
    need to remove the baffle plate.

    The economics are 7m worth of brush vs chimney sweep every year (or twice a
    year if you believe the stove instructions). It doesn't sound a very
    difficult job - but I wonder if there are any gotcha's with liners...

    --
    Tim Watts

    Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
    Tim Watts, Mar 27, 2010
    #3
  4. Tim Watts

    ct Guest

    On 27 Mar, 19:18, Tim Watts <> wrote:
    > Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >
    > Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined chimney
    > or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel liner is
    > just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without knocking the cap
    > cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old hoover attached to
    > catch the crap?
    >
    > --
    > Tim Watts
    >
    > Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.


    I do mine myself. It's a straightforward job, and with care isn't too
    messy. You can buy chemical logs which soften the deposits in the
    chimney prior to sweeping to make it a little easier, but it still
    shouldn't be too difficult. I probably do mine more frequently than I
    would if I paid a sweep, so the deposits don't build up so much
    anyway, and are easier to remove.

    dan.
    ct, Mar 27, 2010
    #4
  5. Tim Watts

    Tim Watts Guest

    ct <>
    wibbled on Saturday 27 March 2010 20:53

    > On 27 Mar, 19:18, Tim Watts <> wrote:
    >> Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >>
    >> Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined
    >> chimney or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel
    >> liner is just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without
    >> knocking the cap cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old
    >> hoover attached to catch the crap?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tim Watts
    >>
    >> Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.

    >
    > I do mine myself. It's a straightforward job, and with care isn't too
    > messy. You can buy chemical logs which soften the deposits in the
    > chimney prior to sweeping to make it a little easier, but it still
    > shouldn't be too difficult. I probably do mine more frequently than I
    > would if I paid a sweep, so the deposits don't build up so much
    > anyway, and are easier to remove.
    >
    > dan.


    Thanks for that. I have seen those logs you speak of - wondered what they
    were for. I think the local farmers place has them.

    --
    Tim Watts

    Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
    Tim Watts, Mar 27, 2010
    #5
  6. Tim Watts

    ARWadsworth Guest

    "Tim Watts" <> wrote in message
    news:hollmb$iar$-september.org...
    > Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >
    > Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined
    > chimney
    > or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel liner is
    > just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without knocking the
    > cap
    > cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old hoover attached to
    > catch the crap?
    >
    > --
    > Tim Watts



    How much soot is the chimney sweep supposed to clean off?

    When I bought my house the previous owner had a coal fire. I had the chimney
    swept and a gas fire installed when I moved in. I never used the gas fire
    and I removed it and the fireplace a few years later. The first thing that
    the cat did after removal was climb the chimney and fetch down loads of soot
    as soon as it saw the open chimney. This was enough soot to ruin the settee
    and the new carpet.

    Adam
    ARWadsworth, Mar 27, 2010
    #6
  7. Tim Watts

    Tim Watts Guest

    ct <>
    wibbled on Saturday 27 March 2010 20:53

    > On 27 Mar, 19:18, Tim Watts <> wrote:
    >> Seeing as we're getting to that time of year...
    >>
    >> Is it worth considering buying a brush set to sweep my one 5" lined
    >> chimney or just leave it to a sweep? I assume sweeping an SS solid fuel
    >> liner is just a matter of pushing a suitably sized brush up (without
    >> knocking the cap cowl off!) and having the bottom sheeted with an old
    >> hoover attached to catch the crap?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tim Watts
    >>
    >> Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.

    >
    > I do mine myself. It's a straightforward job, and with care isn't too
    > messy. You can buy chemical logs which soften the deposits in the
    > chimney prior to sweeping to make it a little easier, but it still
    > shouldn't be too difficult. I probably do mine more frequently than I
    > would if I paid a sweep, so the deposits don't build up so much
    > anyway, and are easier to remove.
    >
    > dan.


    Dumbass question, having looked at brushes... Is a 5" liner swept with a 5"
    brush or a 6" brush?

    --
    Tim Watts

    Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
    Tim Watts, Mar 28, 2010
    #7
  8. Tim Watts

    Tim Watts Guest

    Dave Liquorice <>
    wibbled on Sunday 28 March 2010 11:59

    > On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 09:20:04 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:
    >
    >> Dumbass question, having looked at brushes... Is a 5" liner swept with a
    >> 5" brush or a 6" brush?

    >
    > What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    > What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    > How stiff are the bristles?
    >


    All good questions... I think the fundamental question should be, do I want
    the brush a loose fit or slightly oversized for the tube? The rest I can
    work out then. I suspect I don't want it too tight or I'll pull the liner
    too much... But not an inch undersized as it'll miss bits. Prolly should go
    for the smallest brush which is 5", which should be a comfortable fit in a
    5" liner (the inner being slightly smaller)... It's only a 10 quid risk as
    the poles will fit a 6" brush if I have to but another one...

    --
    Tim Watts

    Managers, politicians and environmentalists: Nature's carbon buffer.
    Tim Watts, Mar 28, 2010
    #8
  9. On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 09:20:04 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

    > Dumbass question, having looked at brushes... Is a 5" liner swept with a
    > 5" brush or a 6" brush?


    What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    How stiff are the bristles?

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
    Dave Liquorice, Mar 28, 2010
    #9
  10. On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 11:53:08 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

    >> What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    >> What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    >> How stiff are the bristles?

    >
    > All good questions... I think the fundamental question should be, do I
    > want the brush a loose fit or slightly oversized for the tube?


    I think slightly oversize and I suspect that will be arranged for
    with a nominal 5" brush for a nominal 5" liner. Soot in an open
    chimney is very soft and comes away easyly, I don't know about the
    soot/deposits in a flue from a stove as the gases are much hotter.

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
    Dave Liquorice, Mar 28, 2010
    #10
  11. Tim Watts

    PeterC Guest

    On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 11:53:08 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

    > Dave Liquorice <>
    > wibbled on Sunday 28 March 2010 11:59
    >
    >> On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 09:20:04 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:
    >>
    >>> Dumbass question, having looked at brushes... Is a 5" liner swept with a
    >>> 5" brush or a 6" brush?

    >>
    >> What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    >> What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    >> How stiff are the bristles?
    >>

    >
    > All good questions... I think the fundamental question should be, do I want
    > the brush a loose fit or slightly oversized for the tube? The rest I can
    > work out then. I suspect I don't want it too tight or I'll pull the liner
    > too much... But not an inch undersized as it'll miss bits. Prolly should go
    > for the smallest brush which is 5", which should be a comfortable fit in a
    > 5" liner (the inner being slightly smaller)... It's only a 10 quid risk as
    > the poles will fit a 6" brush if I have to but another one...


    If it's a bit over, it'd be best to go clear out of the top before
    reversing it. As the bristles straighten, especially stiffish ones, they'll
    tend to 'lock' in to the liner (even worse on a rough surface).
    --
    Peter.
    2x4 - thick plank; 4x4 - two of 'em.
    PeterC, Mar 28, 2010
    #11
  12. Tim Watts

    ARWadsworth Guest

    "Tim Watts" <> wrote in message
    news:honcel$t09$-september.org...
    > Dave Liquorice <>
    > wibbled on Sunday 28 March 2010 11:59
    >
    >> On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 09:20:04 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:
    >>
    >>> Dumbass question, having looked at brushes... Is a 5" liner swept with a
    >>> 5" brush or a 6" brush?

    >>
    >> What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    >> What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    >> How stiff are the bristles?
    >>

    >
    > All good questions... I think the fundamental question should be, do I
    > want
    > the brush a loose fit or slightly oversized for the tube? The rest I can
    > work out then. I suspect I don't want it too tight or I'll pull the liner
    > too much... But not an inch undersized as it'll miss bits. Prolly should
    > go
    > for the smallest brush which is 5", which should be a comfortable fit in a
    > 5" liner (the inner being slightly smaller)... It's only a 10 quid risk as
    > the poles will fit a 6" brush if I have to but another one...
    >
    > --
    > Tim Watts



    Are the theads the same as the ones on drain rods?

    Adam
    ARWadsworth, Mar 28, 2010
    #12
  13. Tim Watts

    andrew Guest

    ARWadsworth wrote:

    > Are the theads the same as the ones on drain rods?


    Yes the screw threads are the same as drain rods.

    AJH
    andrew, Mar 28, 2010
    #13
  14. Tim Watts

    dent Guest


    > > What are the actual diameters of each brush?
    > > What is the actual internal diameter of the liner?
    > > How stiff are the bristles?

    >
    > All good questions... I think the fundamental question should be, do I want
    > the brush a loose fit or slightly oversized for the tube?


    The brushes I've got are the same nominal size as the liner (i.e., 6"
    liner, 6" brush). Don't get a brush which is too big because the
    bristles are very stiff, and pushing it up the chimney becomes
    extremely hard work. The brush should fit snugly, but not so snug that
    you can't easily spin it and pull it in and out. Alternatively, get a
    brush from somewhere like Toolstation, which comes in a single size,
    and then trim it down (tin-snips are good for this) until you get a
    size which works nicely in your chimney.

    dan.
    dent, Mar 28, 2010
    #14
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