Catflap in steel door

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Chris Styles, Apr 2, 2006.

  1. Chris Styles

    Chris Styles Guest

    Okay, so I just drilled the hole at each corner of the square I need to cut
    out of my door to fit a capflap, only to find that the dman thing is made of
    steel... To be more precise, the outter skins of the door (inside and
    outside) are made from I'd say 1.5mm thich steel, with a filling of rigid
    (expanded?) foad in between.

    I've bent a couple of hacksaw blades trying to cut out the square (using the
    hacksaw blade on it;s own like a regular woodworking saw) and I am now
    fairly sure that's not a go-er.

    Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need
    something more fancy. The missus is going to realise any moment now that we
    have 4 12mm holes in out back door, and no chance that the catflap is going
    to be fitted today ;-)

    Cheers

    Chris
     
    Chris Styles, Apr 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. Chris Styles

    Matt Guest

    On Sun, 2 Apr 2006 18:27:13 +0100, "Chris Styles"
    <> wrote:

    >Okay, so I just drilled the hole at each corner of the square I need to cut
    >out of my door to fit a capflap, only to find that the dman thing is made of
    >steel... To be more precise, the outter skins of the door (inside and
    >outside) are made from I'd say 1.5mm thich steel, with a filling of rigid
    >(expanded?) foad in between.
    >
    >I've bent a couple of hacksaw blades trying to cut out the square (using the
    >hacksaw blade on it;s own like a regular woodworking saw) and I am now
    >fairly sure that's not a go-er.
    >
    >Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need
    >something more fancy. The missus is going to realise any moment now that we
    >have 4 12mm holes in out back door, and no chance that the catflap is going
    >to be fitted today ;-)


    If it's the type that use magnetic collars on the cats I reckon you
    ought to read the instructions carefully.

    To keep the whole thing rigid while cutting out I'd drill through a
    couple of inches inside of your cutline and fasten the skins together
    with a few small bolts. Cutting with a padsaw using a wide (1/2" high)
    non-flexible hacksaw blade wouldn't take too long, you could bodge up
    a padsaw like handle with a wrapping of newspaper and gaffer tape. A
    metal cutting jigsaw blade would fly through in a few minutes (no need
    for TC)


    --
     
    Matt, Apr 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. Chris Styles

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <e0p1hi$8j3$>
    Chris Styles <> wrote:
    > Okay, so I just drilled the hole at each corner of the square I need to cut
    > out of my door to fit a capflap, only to find that the dman thing is made of
    > steel... To be more precise, the outter skins of the door (inside and
    > outside) are made from I'd say 1.5mm thich steel, with a filling of rigid
    > (expanded?) foad in between.
    >
    > I've bent a couple of hacksaw blades trying to cut out the square (using the
    > hacksaw blade on it;s own like a regular woodworking saw) and I am now
    > fairly sure that's not a go-er.
    >
    > Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need
    > something more fancy. The missus is going to realise any moment now that we
    > have 4 12mm holes in out back door, and no chance that the catflap is going
    > to be fitted today ;-)
    >

    I'd use an angle grinder with a metal cutting wheel for the skin, then
    the hacksaw blade for the foam. You really need to reinforce the sides
    of the hole once it's cut - pop rivets and steel are probably best for
    that (assuming that the foam will stop you from welding).
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Chris Styles

    dennis@home Guest

    "Matt" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > you could bodge up
    > a padsaw like handle with a wrapping of newspaper and gaffer tape.


    That sounds like a good way to do some serious hand damage when the blade
    snaps.
    A flexible blade wont snap so is much safer.
     
    dennis@home, Apr 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Chris Styles

    Chris Styles Guest

    Yeah, the instructions make it quite clear about the magnets collars... but
    they are godawful things. The magnet is about 25mm long and about 12mm
    diameter... a big chunky for a petite cat...

    Also had a bad experience with one of those a few years ago. Out cat came in
    late one night, and went and sat on top of the still warm 19" CRT monitor
    (which 8 years ago was an expensive piece of kit), with a really quite
    strong manget around his collar. Despite repeeated degaussing, the picture
    was never the same again :-(


    "Matt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 2 Apr 2006 18:27:13 +0100, "Chris Styles"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Okay, so I just drilled the hole at each corner of the square I need to
    >>cut
    >>out of my door to fit a capflap, only to find that the dman thing is made
    >>of
    >>steel... To be more precise, the outter skins of the door (inside and
    >>outside) are made from I'd say 1.5mm thich steel, with a filling of rigid
    >>(expanded?) foad in between.
    >>
    >>I've bent a couple of hacksaw blades trying to cut out the square (using
    >>the
    >>hacksaw blade on it;s own like a regular woodworking saw) and I am now
    >>fairly sure that's not a go-er.
    >>
    >>Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need
    >>something more fancy. The missus is going to realise any moment now that
    >>we
    >>have 4 12mm holes in out back door, and no chance that the catflap is
    >>going
    >>to be fitted today ;-)

    >
    > If it's the type that use magnetic collars on the cats I reckon you
    > ought to read the instructions carefully.
    >
    > To keep the whole thing rigid while cutting out I'd drill through a
    > couple of inches inside of your cutline and fasten the skins together
    > with a few small bolts. Cutting with a padsaw using a wide (1/2" high)
    > non-flexible hacksaw blade wouldn't take too long, you could bodge up
    > a padsaw like handle with a wrapping of newspaper and gaffer tape. A
    > metal cutting jigsaw blade would fly through in a few minutes (no need
    > for TC)
    >
    >
    > --
     
    Chris Styles, Apr 2, 2006
    #5
  6. On Sun, 2 Apr 2006 18:27:13 +0100, "Chris Styles"
    <> wrote:

    |Okay, so I just drilled the hole at each corner of the square I need to cut
    |out of my door to fit a capflap, only to find that the dman thing is made of
    |steel... To be more precise, the outter skins of the door (inside and
    |outside) are made from I'd say 1.5mm thich steel, with a filling of rigid
    |(expanded?) foad in between.
    |
    |I've bent a couple of hacksaw blades trying to cut out the square (using the
    |hacksaw blade on it;s own like a regular woodworking saw) and I am now
    |fairly sure that's not a go-er.
    |
    |Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need
    |something more fancy. The missus is going to realise any moment now that we
    |have 4 12mm holes in out back door, and no chance that the catflap is going
    |to be fitted today ;-)

    A small Angle Grinder, wielded with care would do it.
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Google Groups is IME the *worst*
    method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
    newsreader, say Agent, and a newsserver, say news.individual.net. These
    will allow them: to see only *new* posts, a killfile, and other goodies.
     
    Dave Fawthrop, Apr 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Chris Styles

    Guest

    I did one through the wall instead not to spoil the door. Hire a 6
    inch core drill , would make a hole big enough for most cats or you
    could hack a square hole perhaps? Then build up the catflap part on the
    inside or outside.

    cheers

    Jacob
     
    , Apr 2, 2006
    #7
  8. In article <e0p1hi$8j3$>,
    "Chris Styles" <> writes:
    >
    > Will a jigsaw with the right blades (TC?) be upto the job, or will I need


    Jigsaw will work fine, with regular metal cutting blades.
    The blade will get hot enough to melt/burn the foam, and
    this might gunge up the blade, so I suggest you buy more
    than one.

    Also, protect the door surface from the base of the jigsaw
    which will mark it if they are in direct contact, and you'll
    probably need some ear defenders.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
     
    Andrew Gabriel, Apr 2, 2006
    #8
  9. Chris Styles

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <>
    <> wrote:
    > I did one through the wall instead not to spoil the door.


    That often seems to be a better solution, but people tend to shy away
    from it.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 2, 2006
    #9
  10. Chris Styles

    Chris Styles Guest

    "Rob Morley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>
    > <> wrote:
    >> I did one through the wall instead not to spoil the door.

    >
    > That often seems to be a better solution, but people tend to shy away
    > from it.


    It is an option, and it did get approval from the missus. Sadly, there is
    no convenient place to put it through the wall. Besides, I figure it'd be
    easier to repair/replace the door than to repair/replace the wall!

    Cheers
    Chris
     
    Chris Styles, Apr 2, 2006
    #10
  11. Chris Styles

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <e0pb3c$bab$>
    Chris Styles <> wrote:
    >
    > "Rob Morley" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <>
    > > <> wrote:
    > >> I did one through the wall instead not to spoil the door.

    > >
    > > That often seems to be a better solution, but people tend to shy away
    > > from it.

    >
    > It is an option, and it did get approval from the missus. Sadly, there is
    > no convenient place to put it through the wall. Besides, I figure it'd be
    > easier to repair/replace the door than to repair/replace the wall!
    >

    Depends on the wall. If it's brick outside just carefully remove the
    bricks and save them, then repair is a matter of mixing some mortar and
    sticking them back in. Inside, patching a small area of plaster is
    easy, invisible repairs to wallpaper less so. In those sort of cases
    repair cost and effort is fairly minimal. But without a suitable
    location that's moot anyway.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 3, 2006
    #11
  12. Chris Styles

    Matt Guest

    On Sun, 02 Apr 2006 18:32:01 GMT, "dennis@home"
    <-ass.net> wrote:

    >
    >"Matt" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >> you could bodge up
    >> a padsaw like handle with a wrapping of newspaper and gaffer tape.

    >
    >That sounds like a good way to do some serious hand damage when the blade
    >snaps.
    >A flexible blade wont snap so is much safer.


    Flexible blades are useless for cutting when not under tension. Rigid
    blades are really the only way to cut safely using a blade that is
    unsupported or restrained only over part of its length.

    50 layers of newspaper triple wrapped and covering the end of the
    blade followed by half a dozen layers of gaffa tape is not going
    anywhere. I'd use either a proper padsaw or a jigsaw but building up
    a handle for a one off job out of available household materials can
    give just as safe a solution. It's just two 1.5mm skins of steel FFS!

    Oh and despite the hype flexible blades can snap too.


    --
     
    Matt, Apr 3, 2006
    #12
  13. Chris Styles

    Rob Morley Guest

    In article <>
    Matt <> wrote:
    <snipo>
    > Flexible blades are useless for cutting when not under tension.


    So cut on the pull and tension is applied.

    > 50 layers of newspaper triple wrapped and covering the end of the
    > blade followed by half a dozen layers of gaffa tape is not going
    > anywhere.


    I find a bit of rag tightly wrapped works fine for occasional use, but I
    only use that sort of arrangement for cutting small components where
    access is a problem.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 3, 2006
    #13
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