Bathroom basin plughole

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Andrew McKay, Aug 8, 2003.

  1. Andrew McKay

    Andrew McKay Guest

    I have been confronted with what seems a curious problem with respect
    to a basin in a bathroom. Specifically, the hole where the plug goes
    in.

    When I've worked with these plugholes before the assembly has had a
    central vertical screw or shaft holding it together. Not so this one -
    it has a small round filter which drops into the top of the plughole,
    seemingly unattached - that is, you can just pick it up and remove it.

    When you remove it you've got this 1.5in (or thereabouts - standard
    size for a basin) hole disappearing down to the gubbins beneath. If I
    replaced this assembly from one of the sheds then I'd have a
    permanently fixed filter at the top, physically attached via a screw
    or shaft to the underlying pipework.

    The house is a few years old and I'm leaning towards the idea that
    this small round filter which is loose ought to be fixed in place with
    some sort of mastic or silicone compound, and that the original goo
    may have given way due to age (or maybe broken out by an occupant who
    wanted to clean out the sink trap from above).

    So, question is, should I glue this filter back into the neck of the
    plughole? And if so, what type of sealant should I use for this job?
    I'm assuming some sort of clear silicone sealant spread under the rim
    of the filter before it is pushed back in.

    Sorry if it sounds like a dumb question but I've never seen a basin
    plughole quite like this one :)

    Andrew

    Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
    web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
    Andrew McKay, Aug 8, 2003
    #1
  2. Andrew McKay

    BigWallop Guest

    "Andrew McKay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have been confronted with what seems a curious problem with respect
    > to a basin in a bathroom. Specifically, the hole where the plug goes
    > in.
    >
    > When I've worked with these plugholes before the assembly has had a
    > central vertical screw or shaft holding it together. Not so this one -
    > it has a small round filter which drops into the top of the plughole,
    > seemingly unattached - that is, you can just pick it up and remove it.
    >
    > When you remove it you've got this 1.5in (or thereabouts - standard
    > size for a basin) hole disappearing down to the gubbins beneath. If I
    > replaced this assembly from one of the sheds then I'd have a
    > permanently fixed filter at the top, physically attached via a screw
    > or shaft to the underlying pipework.
    >
    > The house is a few years old and I'm leaning towards the idea that
    > this small round filter which is loose ought to be fixed in place with
    > some sort of mastic or silicone compound, and that the original goo
    > may have given way due to age (or maybe broken out by an occupant who
    > wanted to clean out the sink trap from above).
    >
    > So, question is, should I glue this filter back into the neck of the
    > plughole? And if so, what type of sealant should I use for this job?
    > I'm assuming some sort of clear silicone sealant spread under the rim
    > of the filter before it is pushed back in.
    >
    > Sorry if it sounds like a dumb question but I've never seen a basin
    > plughole quite like this one :)
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    It may be a complete compression waste fitting with a removable filter, so
    have a look around the whole of the waste outlet and trap. Some waste
    outlets, like shower tray outlets, have a removable grating so you can lift
    hair and things without taking the whole thing out. The fitting itself uses
    compression between a top flange in the basin and a nut on the threaded tail
    of the fitting. It might also have a slot cut in the body of the fitting to
    allow the over to drain passed the grating.


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    BigWallop, Aug 9, 2003
    #2
  3. Andrew McKay

    Andrew McKay Guest

    On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 12:26:46 GMT, "BigWallop"
    <spamguard@spam_guard.com> wrote:

    >It may be a complete compression waste fitting with a removable filter, so
    >have a look around the whole of the waste outlet and trap. Some waste
    >outlets, like shower tray outlets, have a removable grating so you can lift
    >hair and things without taking the whole thing out. The fitting itself uses
    >compression between a top flange in the basin and a nut on the threaded tail
    >of the fitting. It might also have a slot cut in the body of the fitting to
    >allow the over to drain passed the grating.


    If it is a compression fitting then it's lost its ability to compress
    - the thing is just sitting loose in the hole of the basin.

    I might change the whole basin plughole arrangement next time I go
    there. I've been tasked to try and do something with it anyway.

    Andrew

    Do you need a handyman service? Check out our
    web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
    Andrew McKay, Aug 9, 2003
    #3
  4. "Andrew McKay" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On Sat, 09 Aug 2003 12:26:46 GMT, "BigWallop"
    > <spamguard@spam_guard.com> wrote:
    >
    > >It may be a complete compression waste fitting with a removable filter,

    so
    > >have a look around the whole of the waste outlet and trap. Some waste
    > >outlets, like shower tray outlets, have a removable grating so you can

    lift
    > >hair and things without taking the whole thing out. The fitting itself

    uses
    > >compression between a top flange in the basin and a nut on the threaded

    tail
    > >of the fitting. It might also have a slot cut in the body of the fitting

    to
    > >allow the over to drain passed the grating.

    >
    > If it is a compression fitting then it's lost its ability to compress
    > - the thing is just sitting loose in the hole of the basin.


    Maybe it had a rubber washer which has now perished? If you want to re-seal
    it them plumber's mait is your friend and ally. (The only place not to use
    this is on fibreglass/acrylic baths etc where it may do something nasty to
    the plastics.)


    > I might change the whole basin plughole arrangement next time I go
    > there. I've been tasked to try and do something with it anyway.


    It does sound rather like the easy-clean (? sp? probbaly with a z and a k in
    it somewhere) shower trap (anyone know where to get these BTW? cheapish,
    ideally).

    --
    John Stumbles
    -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
    -+
    Load dropped, paperwork completed: job done.
    John Stumbles, Aug 10, 2003
    #4

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