Attaching sill plate to slab

Discussion in 'Building Construction' started by Duke, Jun 27, 2003.

  1. Duke

    Duke Guest

    Due to a mix-up over when the pouring would occur for our 20x24 garage
    I did not get the anchor bolts to the site in time.

    What is the recommended way of attaching the sill plate to the
    hardened slab at this point in time (slab was poured earlier this
    week)? I have looked at something called "Tapcon" while a friend
    wants me to rent his ramset gun. I am a little hesitant about using
    it as he says it is possible to fracture the concrete if not done
    properly.

    Suggestions, ideas?

    Thanks again.
    Jake
     
    Duke, Jun 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. Duke

    Bob Morrison Guest

    In article <> Duke
    says...
    > What is the recommended way of attaching the sill plate to the
    > hardened slab at this point in time (slab was poured earlier this
    > week)? I have looked at something called "Tapcon" while a friend
    > wants me to rent his ramset gun. I am a little hesitant about using
    > it as he says it is possible to fracture the concrete if not done
    > properly.
    >

    Why not rent a Roto-hammer and use 1/2" concrete wedge anchors? These
    are the kind with a thread on top and an expansion collar at the bottom.
    They cost a little over $1 each.

    An installation tip: put a nut (or two) on the threaded end with the
    top of the nut just above the top of the thread BEFORE you whack it with
    a hammer to expand the collar. That way you are beating on the nut and
    not on the threads. Don't forget to leave enough of the anchor exposed
    to allow for your wood plate and the square washer required by the
    building code. Minimum embedment is usually on the order of 2-3/4" to
    3-1/4"

    You should be able do the whole building in a couple of hours including
    the plate installation.

    --
    Bob Morrison
    R.L. Morrison Engineering Co.
    Structural and Civil Engineering
    Poulsbo WA
     
    Bob Morrison, Jun 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. Duke

    Bob Morrison Guest

    In article <> Rico dJour
    says...
    > Bob, you're supposed to play the role of engineering advisor - flow rates,
    > shear wall design, etc. This new obsession with giving good, practical
    > hands-on construction advice is just going to confuse people who didn't get the
    > Playbill on the way in!
    >

    Rico:

    Well I guess that's what happens when one has "pounded a few nails"
    during one's career. Besides I like working with contractors and have
    always tried to come up with easy and inexpensive to build designs.

    --
    Bob Morrison
    R.L. Morrison Engineering Co.
    Structural and Civil Engineering
    Poulsbo WA
     
    Bob Morrison, Jun 27, 2003
    #3
  4. Duke

    jim mitchell Guest

    Jeff Dantzler <> wrote in message news:<1056740410.880562@yasure>...
    > I've got to replace a section of rotted sill plate on my garage. I
    > looked into a variety of anchors and decided on "Wedge Bolts" by Powers
    > fasteners. These are basically a high-strength "bolt" with a special
    > thread designed for concrete. They are cheaper than the sleave anchors,
    > but have comparable pullout and shear strengths. You have to use their
    > bits though. Powers makes a wide variety of anchors including the
    > (formerly known as) Rawl bolts that rock climbers bolt routes with. Their
    > website is very informative.
    >
    > Jeff Dantzler



    if the sill plates are 2x4, i'd use epoxy, getting too close to the
    edge with the wedge anchors might fracture the slab especially with
    new concrete.
     
    jim mitchell, Jun 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Duke

    Bob Marencin Guest

    I would probably go with buying a few 1/2" threaded rods they usualy come in
    6' sizes or arround there and 2 part epoxy them into a hole you make using a
    1/2" hammer drill and 5/8" carbide bit.

    an easy way to cut threaded rod is to put 2 nuts on the rod slide them down
    about 6" then tighten them against eachother with 2 wrenches untill they are
    pretty tight. Use a bi-metal blade in a reciprocating saw or a hack saw if
    you dont have one.

    sometimes you hack the threads up pretty good so adding a third nut on the
    side your cutting off might be a good idea untill you get use to it.

    as long as the nut is on the rod you will be fine because you will keep them
    longer then come back and cut them after the epoxy drys and you tighten them
    down

    then drill a hole through the plate into the concrete on one end slip a dry
    rod in it then drill one on the other side for alignment.

    after that you can take the plate up drill holes in it with a wood bit then
    put it back on the loose bolts to align it then drill through the plate
    holes you made with a carbide bit .

    its easier to align the bolts with the plate this way. you dont want to
    drill a bunch of holes and find your off 3/4" because you cant elongate the
    holes and hunting for them isnt real fun.

    Fill all the holes with epoxy
    Place the plate down
    nuts & washers on the rod
    stick them through the plate into the epoxy
    dont expect to get them on later if the threads are bad on the end

    let the epoxy harden overnight before tightening.

    bob marencin
    www.yourepair.com






    "Duke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Due to a mix-up over when the pouring would occur for our 20x24 garage
    > I did not get the anchor bolts to the site in time.
    >
    > What is the recommended way of attaching the sill plate to the
    > hardened slab at this point in time (slab was poured earlier this
    > week)? I have looked at something called "Tapcon" while a friend
    > wants me to rent his ramset gun. I am a little hesitant about using
    > it as he says it is possible to fracture the concrete if not done
    > properly.
    >
    > Suggestions, ideas?
    >
    > Thanks again.
    > Jake
     
    Bob Marencin, Jun 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Duke

    wmbjk Guest

    "Bob Marencin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > bob marencin
    > www.yourepair.com


    Hi Bob, I had a quick visit to your site. Asfault? C'mon, the correct
    spelling is ASSFAULT. ;-)

    Wayne
     
    wmbjk, Jun 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Duke

    Bob Marencin Guest

    heh I made that site in like 2 weeks last fall
    I have to totally redo it and add a lot of stuff.
    hopefully i will have a chance this summer.

    look harder you will find many more mistakes
    :eek:)

    bob


    "wmbjk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Bob Marencin" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > bob marencin
    > > www.yourepair.com

    >
    > Hi Bob, I had a quick visit to your site. Asfault? C'mon, the correct
    > spelling is ASSFAULT. ;-)
    >
    > Wayne
    >
    >
     
    Bob Marencin, Jun 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Duke

    Jim Fincher Guest

    I doubt that an inspector would accept an epoxy connection without mechanical
    attachment... expecting the bond to be as strong as true fasteners is
    unrealistic...

    Jim

    "jim mitchell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jeff Dantzler <> wrote in message

    news:<1056740410.880562@yasure>...
    > > I've got to replace a section of rotted sill plate on my garage. I
    > > looked into a variety of anchors and decided on "Wedge Bolts" by Powers
    > > fasteners. These are basically a high-strength "bolt" with a special
    > > thread designed for concrete. They are cheaper than the sleave anchors,
    > > but have comparable pullout and shear strengths. You have to use their
    > > bits though. Powers makes a wide variety of anchors including the
    > > (formerly known as) Rawl bolts that rock climbers bolt routes with. Their
    > > website is very informative.
    > >
    > > Jeff Dantzler

    >
    >
    > if the sill plates are 2x4, i'd use epoxy, getting too close to the
    > edge with the wedge anchors might fracture the slab especially with
    > new concrete.
     
    Jim Fincher, Jun 28, 2003
    #8
  9. "Rico dJour" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >From: "Bob Marencin"
    > >
    > >I would probably go with buying a few 1/2" threaded rods they usualy come

    in
    > >6' sizes or arround there and 2 part epoxy them into a hole you make

    using a
    > >1/2" hammer drill and 5/8" carbide bit.
    > >
    > >an easy way to cut threaded rod is to put 2 nuts on the rod slide them

    down
    > >about 6" then tighten them against eachother with 2 wrenches untill they

    are
    > >pretty tight. Use a bi-metal blade in a reciprocating saw or a hack saw

    if
    > >you dont have one.
    > >
    > >sometimes you hack the threads up pretty good so adding a third nut on

    the
    > >side your cutting off might be a good idea untill you get use to it.
    > >
    > >as long as the nut is on the rod you will be fine because you will keep

    them
    > >longer then come back and cut them after the epoxy drys and you tighten

    them
    > >down
    > >
    > >then drill a hole through the plate into the concrete on one end slip a

    dry
    > >rod in it then drill one on the other side for alignment.
    > >
    > >after that you can take the plate up drill holes in it with a wood bit

    then
    > >put it back on the loose bolts to align it then drill through the plate
    > >holes you made with a carbide bit .
    > >
    > >its easier to align the bolts with the plate this way. you dont want to
    > >drill a bunch of holes and find your off 3/4" because you cant elongate

    the
    > >holes and hunting for them isnt real fun.
    > >
    > >Fill all the holes with epoxy
    > >Place the plate down
    > >nuts & washers on the rod
    > >stick them through the plate into the epoxy
    > >dont expect to get them on later if the threads are bad on the end
    > >
    > >let the epoxy harden overnight before tightening.

    >
    > How much do you figure you're saving in material cost for all that extra

    work
    > with the threaded rods? When you figure in the epoxy, isn't a wedged

    anchor
    > cheaper and easier all the way around?


    Not when the diameter reaches 1 1/4" or so, I've never seen wedge anchors
    that big although someone somewhere probably makes them. In big sizes we
    always see epoxy anchors specified, and they are commonly available. Of
    course you wouldn't use 1 1/2" anchors in the aformentioned sill plate : )
    The Hilti glass capsule epoxy anchors I've used weren't driven by hammer,
    they are screwed in with the hammer drill using a special socket and double
    nut on the rod, that mixes the epoxy components well. These anchors will
    pull out a fairly big chunk of concrete before they will break the epoxy
    bond.

    regards,
    JTMcC.
    >
    > R
     
    John T. McCracken, Jun 29, 2003
    #9
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