Arrgh - Double Glazed Sealed Units

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Tim S, Aug 28, 2008.

  1. Tim S

    Tim S Guest

    Is it impossible to order these online for a sensible price?

    I can get an instant quite for new uPVC windows, any size almost any type
    with ease.

    I just want a reasonably priced supplier for DG units to fix some existing
    frames.

    Been round the local glaziers - all coming up with what seem fairly high
    prices of around 130 quid per square meter for 12mm gap 4+4mm toughened
    glass, low-e.

    Anyone got a web address of a DG sealed unit supplier?

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim S, Aug 28, 2008
    #1
  2. Tim S

    A.Lee Guest

    Tim S <> wrote:

    > Been round the local glaziers - all coming up with what seem fairly high
    > prices of around 130 quid per square meter for 12mm gap 4+4mm toughened
    > glass, low-e.


    That sounds about right to me - plain 'normal' glass units would be a
    third of the price, toughening and low-e add a lot to the cost.

    The last one I bought cost me £26 for a 4mm/4mm plain glass unit of
    around 1200 x 500mm.
    Thats roughly £50/metre by a quick reckoning. I know a plain sheet of
    glass, toughened, is double the price, so your prices do not seem too
    excessive.
    Alan.
    --
    To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
    A.Lee, Aug 28, 2008
    #2
  3. Tim S

    Tim S Guest

    A.Lee coughed up some electrons that declared:

    > Tim S <> wrote:
    >
    >> Been round the local glaziers - all coming up with what seem fairly high
    >> prices of around 130 quid per square meter for 12mm gap 4+4mm toughened
    >> glass, low-e.

    >
    > That sounds about right to me - plain 'normal' glass units would be a
    > third of the price, toughening and low-e add a lot to the cost.
    >
    > The last one I bought cost me £26 for a 4mm/4mm plain glass unit of
    > around 1200 x 500mm.
    > Thats roughly £50/metre by a quick reckoning. I know a plain sheet of
    > glass, toughened, is double the price, so your prices do not seem too
    > excessive.
    > Alan.


    Hi Alan,

    Thanks for that - nice to know I'm not being boned ;->

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim S, Aug 28, 2008
    #3
  4. Tim S

    Tim S Guest

    Dave Plowman (News) coughed up some electrons that declared:

    > In article <48b5e046$0$628$>,
    > Tim S <> wrote:
    >> Is it impossible to order these online for a sensible price?

    >
    >> I can get an instant quite for new uPVC windows, any size almost any type
    >> with ease.

    >
    >> I just want a reasonably priced supplier for DG units to fix some
    >> existing frames.

    >
    >> Been round the local glaziers - all coming up with what seem fairly high
    >> prices of around 130 quid per square meter for 12mm gap 4+4mm toughened
    >> glass, low-e.

    >
    >> Anyone got a web address of a DG sealed unit supplier?

    >
    > Think the problem is you want toughened to a custom size. A 'standard'
    > double glazed custom unit is nothing like that cost - and toughened ones
    > made in bulk for uPVC windows should also be much cheaper as replacements.
    >
    > To explain, toughened glass must be cut to size as ordinary glass then
    > toughened.
    >
    > Might be cheaper to use laminated - if that is allowed for your
    > application.
    >


    Hi Dave,

    It's a good point. I don't have a building regs need for toughened - all the
    windows are sufficiently high off the floor.

    But I do have a small lad and a lot of ground floor windows, so I was
    considering that something a bit stronger than regular annealed glass would
    be a good idea, to be more football and pikey resistant (resistant, not
    unbreakable).

    I wouldn't mind laminated, but I didn't know it could be done for 4+12+4mm
    units?

    The scenario is: I have lots of perfectly good ali framed DG windows, but
    some of the larger panels are misted. If I have to replace those, might as
    well be low-e (most of the windows are quite large) and I might as well
    re-do all of the panels in at least the larger bay windows. They're going
    to get stripped down, removed, the hardwood frames checked and re-treated
    and refitted, so it's not much extra work. I can even reuse some of the OK
    panels in a shed/workshop later.

    Thoughts would be welcome.

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim S, Aug 28, 2008
    #4
  5. Tim S

    Pete C ukdiy Guest

    On Aug 28, 8:42 am, "Dave Plowman (News)" <>
    wrote:
    > Think the problem is you want toughened to a custom size. A 'standard'
    > double glazed custom unit is nothing like that cost - and toughened ones
    > made in bulk for uPVC windows should also be much cheaper as replacements..


    Anyone know of a list or table somewhere on the web that lists the
    standard sizes?


    On Aug 28, 9:38 am, Tim S <> wrote:
    > But I do have a small lad and a lot of ground floor windows, so I was
    > considering that something a bit stronger than regular annealed glass would
    > be a good idea, to be more football and pikey resistant (resistant, not
    > unbreakable).


    I read somewhere double glazing may be a little more football proof
    than expected as the airgap forms a cushion. Maybe put lots of tape on
    an old one and do some testing? :)

    For break ins you want something that breaks into great big shards not
    safe little bits.

    cheers,
    Pete.
    Pete C ukdiy, Aug 28, 2008
    #5
  6. On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 01:57:09 -0700 (PDT), Pete C ukdiy wrote:

    > For break ins you want something that breaks into great big shards not
    > safe little bits.


    Aye and makes a lot of noise doing it. Toughened will almost silently
    disintegrate if attacked with an automatic center punch...

    Not sure if you can get low-e(*) laminated glass, can't think why not the
    low-e is only a coating on the glass so only the outer pane needs to be of
    that. The inner can be ordinary glass as you say building regs for
    toughened don't apply.

    It might be worth looking at real figures for low-e v ordinary glass, the
    energy savings might not be justified against the additional cost. Low-e
    also has to be installed the right way round, AIUI get it wrong and the
    units can explode or at least fail in a dramatic manner.

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
    Dave Liquorice, Aug 28, 2008
    #6
  7. Tim S

    Tim S Guest

    Dave Liquorice coughed up some electrons that declared:

    > On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 01:57:09 -0700 (PDT), Pete C ukdiy wrote:
    >
    >> For break ins you want something that breaks into great big shards not
    >> safe little bits.

    >
    > Aye and makes a lot of noise doing it. Toughened will almost silently
    > disintegrate if attacked with an automatic center punch...
    >
    > Not sure if you can get low-e(*) laminated glass, can't think why not the
    > low-e is only a coating on the glass so only the outer pane needs to be of
    > that. The inner can be ordinary glass as you say building regs for
    > toughened don't apply.
    >
    > It might be worth looking at real figures for low-e v ordinary glass, the
    > energy savings might not be justified against the additional cost. Low-e
    > also has to be installed the right way round, AIUI get it wrong and the
    > units can explode or at least fail in a dramatic manner.
    >


    These are all good points of course. For the bays being 1.5m wide x 0.7m
    deep and about 1.2m high, intuition suggests it's worth at least bothering
    to do the calculation[1].

    But it's nice to have some prices in mind as I go.

    [1] I have been working on the assumption that the cavities are insulated.
    However recent incursions into the upper parts of the wall have not
    indicated any insulation present. So either there isn't any, or it's
    slumped. Find that out in due course when I stick some holes in low down,
    but in that case, I'd put the money to topping up the cavity insulation - I
    *know* that'll be far more cost efficient.

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim S, Aug 28, 2008
    #7

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Shabs
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    266
    Shabs
    Jan 7, 2005
  2. Simon
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    2,412
    Simon
    Feb 14, 2005
  3. Al Reynolds

    Replacing double-glazed sealed units

    Al Reynolds, May 11, 2005, in forum: UK DIY
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    718
    David Hearn
    May 11, 2005
  4. Bren
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    168
    Mary Fisher
    May 15, 2005
  5. Mike Myers
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    613
    Ziggur
    Jul 22, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page